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 Post subject: Citori - Complete Receiver Tuneup - With Pics
PostPosted: Sun Jun 26, 2011 4:44 pm 
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This article will show how to clean and replace all common wear parts in the Citori receiver. No special tools or skills are necessary so anybody who is reasonably handy should be able to complete this job easily. Total time about one hour after you have done it once. Allow a couple of hours the first time.

I got my 12ga Citori (XS Skeet) in June 2006. As of now (June 2011) the gun has 68k bullets thru it, all reloads. I shot registered skeet for one season, took a couple of years off and now shoot registered sporting. My load is: 24gm shot, 17gn Promo, CB0178-12 wads, Fio 616 primers in Rem GunClub hulls. I love the Citori, it remains in perfect mechanical condition, never malfunctions and it is cheap and easy to maintain.

Based on my experience with my own gun and what I have seen of friend's guns I have no doubt that my Citori will easily make 150k firings with nothing more than routine maintenance - meaning regular cleaning and occasional receiver tuneups, which are cheap and easy enough for any home gunsmith.

This procedure covers everything within the capability of a home gunsmith. I do not recommend going any further unless you actually know what you are doing! :) How often receiver maintenance is necessary depends on how you use the gun. Cleaning habits, type of ammo used, type of gun use, frequency of use, etc will make a big difference. I tuneup my receiver about every 20k firings (I count primers used). It would not hurt to just clean the firing pins and channels every 10k firings. I am getting 20k out of my gun with no misfires because I changed my cleaning procedure to avoid getting gunk into the firing pin holes.

General tips for long gun life: clean barrels after every use; clean receiver area and apply new grease/oil after every use; don't store the gun with the hammers cocked; clean the receiver face with the hammers in fired position and be careful not to force cleaning solvents or oil/grease into the firing pin holes during cleaning. Don't slam the gun open or closed too hard but do not retard the top lever, let it snap into it's closed position.

Note: some/most Citoris will misfire the lower barrel eventually. This is usually caused by bad reloads (bad primer, dished case head, etc) or dirty firing pins/channels and sometimes weak hammer springs. New Browning firing pins are slightly longer than older versions and probably reduce this problem. Aftermarket hammer springs are also available. I tried Wolf springs, they worked fine but I don't know whether they are any better than factory springs.

Note: It is quick and easy to get parts directly from Browning! Call the parts department and order over the phone with a credit card: 636.287.6800. You need the part number(s) which you can look up online in the parts manual at: http://www.browning.com/customerservice ... /index.asp
I just finished a tuneup and the total parts bill was under $50 delivered and included several spares.

Here are the part numbers and prices for the replacement parts I ordered (all 12ga):
B1334293 Hammer spring (mainspring) $3.00
B1334267 Hammer pin $3.75
B1334168 Firing pin retainer pin $2.25
B1334148 Firing pin over $5.75
B1334157 Firing pin under $6.25
B1334164 Firing pin spring under 2.50

Here are the tuneup steps:

1) Remove forearm and barrels.
Image

2) Remove recoil pad from stock
Put some ArmorAll on the pad slits and the screwdriver tip for easy insertion. My gun uses Philips screws.
Image

3) Remove stock from receiver; hammers should be in fired position.
My gun came with a big Allen wrench to remove the stock bolt. After you unscrew the bolt (it does not actually come out of my stock) tap/bump the receiver with your hand from several directions until it starts to come off then carefully pull it straight out of the stock.
Image
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4) Remove hammer springs and spring guides
Use needle-nose pliers or file a slot in an old screwdriver like I did and pry the tip of the spring guide out of the recess in the hammer. The guide and spring come out pretty easy, the guide might zoom out from spring tension if the tool slips so be careful.
The spring guides should not need replacement as long as they are not bent or beat up. Examine the tip that fits into the recess on the hammers, these tips should be rounded and smooth, the shaft should also be smooth and straight. I polish the guides with ScotchBrite pads or fine silicone carbide paper.
Image

5) Remove hammer pins
The hammer pins are held in by the slot in the ejector trip rods. The pins are not screwed in tight but rather backed out about a half turn so the 2 flat surfaces at the top of the pin fit into the slot in the ejector trip rod. You cannot unscrew the hammer pins until you push the ejector trip rods back toward the rear of the receiver using a punch from the front of the receiver. Note that the ejector trip rod has a round area at the front end of the slot. Push the trip rod backwards until the hammer pin is inside the round area, then you can unscrew the hammer pin and remove it. Sometimes pliers are needed to pull the pin out completely because the sear is putting tension on the hammer which binds the pin.
Image

I have never had a hammer pin break but several high volume target shooters in our area have reported hammer pin breakage. The new hammer pins I received measure .1575" in diameter, the old ones I removed measure .1555". Obviously, the old pins have worn and thus I replaced them. I had removed the original hammer pins, cleaned and lubed them twice in prior tuneups but did not replace them. Now that I hear other shooters have had breakage I will replace the pins at every tuneup - they are cheap, $3.75 each.

6) Remove hammers
Once the pins are out you can simply wiggle the hammers out. The sears sort of get in the way but you can move them away with your finger.
Image

7) Remove firing pin retainer pins
These pins should tap out easily with a punch and small hammer. The top pin must be tapped out from the right side of the receiver and the bottom pin tapped out from the left side. You will see a chamfer on one side of the pin holes in the receiver. The pins get inserted into the side with the chamfer and tapped out from the reverse side. You will see that the pins have knurling on one end. The knurling holds the pin in the hole. When replacing the pins, insert the end of the pin with no knurling first. These pins are cheap, replace them every time they are removed.
Image

8) Remove firing pins and lower firing pin spring
The firing pins might fall out after you remove the retainer pins, but I always have to push mine out with a toothpick from the front becase they are always filthy with gunk from firing and cleaning. By the way I buy packs of wood toothpicks and barbecue skewers at Walmart in various sizes, they are super handy for gun cleaning and parts removal, etc.
See my old post for more detail on FP maintenance:
viewtopic.php?f=12&t=89866
Image

9) Remove ejector trip rods
The ejector trip rods don't actually need to be removed but I recommend it highly. Just push them backwards toward the rear of the receiver with a punch from the front until you can pull them out with your fingers or pull them out with a punch in the slot. The trip rod channels get filthy and need to be cleaned out and the rods themselves should be cleaned and re-lubed. The trip rods may also need to be polished and/or re-bent. Neither of my trip rods was bent quite right from the factory and they were binding in their channels excessively. The trip rods should be snug in their channels but still fairly easy to push back and forth with your finger or a punch. The trip rods are pushed forward by the hammer upon firing and backwards by the forearm when you open the gun after firing. Excessive binding of the trip rods can contribute to misfires by retarding hammer speed and also make the gun harder to open. I re-bent my trip rods (made them a little straighter) and sanded them smoother until they moved back and forth in their channels much easier. This may be one reason why I never get misfires. Don't go nuts bending the trip rods, small changes make a big difference so make a little bend, re-install in the gun and test for smoothness.
Image

10) Clean parts to be reused
Thoroughly clean and, if necessary, polish/smooth any parts to be reused (probably just the hammers, hammer spring guides and trip rods)
Image
Image
This shows the old and new parts for comparison:
Image

11) Clean receiver
I clean my receiver by squirting it with a lot of drugstore alcohol, cleaning out all holes with alcohol soaked Q-Tips or a little electric razor cleaning brush, scrubbing everything with a toothbrush and then blowing all the remaining gunk out with a blower attachment on an air compressor.
Image
Image

12) Reassemble in reverse order using new parts and lube as appropriate
The only tricky parts are installing the hammer pins and hammer springs.

Hammer pins: Test install both hammer pins, on the right and left sides, to make sure they thread smoothly and go all the way in. My right side pin hole must have had a defect in the threads because it was extremely difficult to screw the new pin all the way in. The old pin was also hard to screw out or in. I cleaned the threads up and new pins now go in smoothly. Note: if your pins do not screw all the way in smoothly be careful not to ding up the screwdriver slot in the pin since it might bind in the slot in the trip rod. It is a good idea to buy 4 pins in case you have a problem and need a spare.

Once your hammer pins screw in properly, install the ejector trip rods and hammers. Then push the trip rods in/out until the round section of the slot lines up perfectly with the hammer pin hole. Then visually line up the hole in the hammer with the hammer pin hole. Then push the hammer pin into the receiver hole until it stops at the inside threaded portion of the hammer pin hole. Usually the hammer must be pushed/wiggled as you insert the hammer pin until the pin goes all the way through the hammer itself. The sears tend to get in the way and need to be pushed with a finger. Once the pin is pushed through the hammer hole you can then screw it all the way into the threads until it bottoms. Then back the hammer pin out about a half turn until the flat sides of the top of the pin line up with the slot in the trip rod. Then you can push the trip rod forward. The pin is now loose in the threads but cannot turn because the trip rod slot holds the pin in alignment. When you are installing the hammer and hammer pins, lube the hole in the hammer and the shaft of the hammer pin with a film of grease.
Image

Hammer springs: This is the hardest part but easy once you get used to it. The problem is that the hammer springs must be compressed so you can push the tip of the spring guide rod into the recess in the hammer. First put the hammers in their fired position. Then insert just the guide rod into the hole at the rear of the receiver and insert the tip of the guide rod into the hammer recess. This is super easy and shows you how the guide rod fits. Now simply repeat this operation with the hammer spring installed on the guide rod. This will take most people a few tries because compressing the spring is a little difficult and everything tends to slip. Some folks use needle-nose pliers to grip the tip of the guide rod and push it into the recess on the hammer but I like to use an old screwdriver with U-shaped slot filed in it.
Image

The only other point I should mention is that when installing the firing pin retainer pins, note that the firing pins have cutouts that must oriented properly so the retainer pins will go in their holes. And obviously don't forget the spring that goes on the lower firing pin. Push the retainer pins in as far as they will go by hand then tap them in flush with the receiver surface using a small punch and hammer. Top pin goes in from the left side and bottom pin goes in from the right side.

Once the receiver is back together I lightly oil the moving parts, heavy oil on the main parts and light oil on the trigger parts. I also put a little grease on the hammer/sear contact surfaces. Oil/grease brands are pretty much a matter of personal preference. Any decent gun oil/grease will work fine. Wipe off any excess oil/grease with a Q-Tip, put the stock/recoil pad back on and you are done.

Good shooting!



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Last edited by William R Wood on Thu Jun 30, 2011 11:25 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Citori - Complete Receiver Tuneup - With Pics
PostPosted: Sun Jun 26, 2011 5:20 pm 
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WOW William!

thanks for the great DIY . You and Seamus must have gone to the same school for instruction manual writing and photography!

Your write ups are excellent. Now all i need is a nice Citori to overhaul!

Bull


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 Post subject: Re: Citori - Complete Receiver Tuneup - With Pics
PostPosted: Sun Jun 26, 2011 6:44 pm 
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Nice Job!

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 Post subject: Re: Citori - Complete Receiver Tuneup - With Pics
PostPosted: Tue Jun 28, 2011 6:57 pm 
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I have only just scanned through it, but it looks very well done.

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 Post subject: Re: Citori - Complete Receiver Tuneup - With Pics
PostPosted: Tue Jun 28, 2011 7:26 pm 
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Doug,
Would you consider doing something similar for the Cynergy?


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 Post subject: Re: Citori - Complete Receiver Tuneup - With Pics
PostPosted: Tue Jun 28, 2011 11:31 pm 
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Thanks, this is the only one of my guns that I have never taken apart. Great job.

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 Post subject: Re: Citori - Complete Receiver Tuneup - With Pics
PostPosted: Wed Jun 29, 2011 12:34 am 
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Actually I have plans along these lines for the Cynergy. I just have too many irons in the fire right at the moment. It's in the works, just not at the top of the list yet.

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 Post subject: Re: Citori - Complete Receiver Tuneup - With Pics
PostPosted: Wed Jun 29, 2011 9:10 pm 
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Mods should make this a sticky in the Browning forum. Nice write up!


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 Post subject: Re: Citori - Complete Receiver Tuneup - With Pics
PostPosted: Thu Jun 30, 2011 12:07 am 
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Bill,

Excellent writeup and pics! Thanks for taking the time to post this.

Here are a couple of comments that I thought of when reading/viewing your post. Your firing pins have some SERIOUS grime and stains on them. I wonder why? I've cleaned mine several times and they don't look anywhere near that cruddy. Could it be a combination of grime being forced into the firing pin hole in the breechface and perhaps pierced primers? Just wondering.

Second, for those who don't want to remove this many parts for one reason or another, I have a much easier way that I use to clean my receiver parts. I simply dunk the whole receiver into a pan filled with kerosene. Slosh it around vigorously for awhile and let it sit in the kerosene for an hour or so......... then slosh it some more. Then remove from the kerosene and let it drip dry and/or blow dry. This works for me on everything except the firing pins which I remove in order to clean them and their recesses. Removing firing pins is very easy and takes only a couple of minutes once the stock is off the receiver.

Again, thanks for the very thorough writeup. I, too, think this should be a "Sticky".

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 Post subject: Re: Citori - Complete Receiver Tuneup - With Pics
PostPosted: Thu Jun 30, 2011 10:48 am 
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Ulysses wrote:
Bill,

Excellent writeup and pics! Thanks for taking the time to post this.

Here are a couple of comments that I thought of when reading/viewing your post. Your firing pins have some SERIOUS grime and stains on them. I wonder why? I've cleaned mine several times and they don't look anywhere near that cruddy. Could it be a combination of grime being forced into the firing pin hole in the breechface and perhaps pierced primers? Just wondering.


Ulysses,

Good question. After taking the stock off many times and inspecting the firing pins, I am positive that the large amount of gunk on my firing pins is from the following factors:

1) dirty powder in my reloads - Promo
2) cleaning solvents being forced into the firing pin holes while cleaning the breechface
3) reloading my hulls 8 times - after 2-3 reloads the primers are not as tight in the case head and powder residue leaks past the primer and gets deposited on the breechface, some of which gets blown into the firing pin holes.
4) shooting a lot - I am shooting at the rate of about 25,000 bullets a year.

Since I am getting about 10k firings out of the gun with no misfires between firing pin cleanings and 20k firings between tuneups, I am happy even though the firing pins do look like heck. I am going to switch to ClayDot powder soon which is much cleaner than Promo and maybe that will help. Meanwhile I am being more careful not to get cleaning solvent in the firing pin holes. After I shoot a typical day's practice (200 bullets) my breechface has a hard black ring of powder residue around the firing pin hole. I have to clean this ring off right away or it gets baked on the metal and is very hard to remove. The only thing that takes the ring off is powder solvent and even though I clean the gun with the firing pins protruding from the breechface some of the solvent and dirty gunk is obviously getting inside the firing pin holes and on the firing pins. My hunting guns, also Citoris, are clean as a whistle even after years. But they don't get shot anywhere near as much at the target gun.

Quote:
Second, for those who don't want to remove this many parts for one reason or another, I have a much easier way that I use to clean my receiver parts. I simply dunk the whole receiver into a pan filled with kerosene. Slosh it around vigorously for awhile and let it sit in the kerosene for an hour or so......... then slosh it some more. Then remove from the kerosene and let it drip dry and/or blow dry. This works for me on everything except the firing pins which I remove in order to clean them and their recesses. Removing firing pins is very easy and takes only a couple of minutes once the stock is off the receiver.


I agree completely and like your cleaning method. I did put a post on the forum a few years back showing how to remove and clean just the firing pins. It is really fast and easy once you try it, no more than 10 minutes with a little practice.

Quote:
Again, thanks for the very thorough writeup. I, too, think this should be a "Sticky".


Thanks

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 Post subject: Re: Citori - Complete Receiver Tuneup - With Pics
PostPosted: Sun Jul 03, 2011 6:47 pm 
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Bill -- Another excellent thread for Citori owners. I still use the firing pin maintenance thread you posted in 2006. For those who are interested, here is the link: viewtopic.php?t=89866&highlight=citori .
Thanks and Happy Independence Day! -- Bert

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 Post subject: Re: Citori - Complete Receiver Tuneup - With Pics
PostPosted: Mon Jul 04, 2011 12:07 pm 
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Great job! Do you have a Beretta 68x gun? I'd love to see this same process with the Beretta.

Thanks

Adam


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 Post subject: Re: Citori - Complete Receiver Tuneup - With Pics
PostPosted: Wed Jul 27, 2011 11:14 pm 
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Thank you for the posting..

It really is a big help... {hs#

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 Post subject: Re: Citori - Complete Receiver Tuneup - With Pics
PostPosted: Sat Aug 20, 2011 4:09 am 
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Much appreciated. Thanks for posting.

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 Post subject: Re: Citori - Complete Receiver Tuneup - With Pics
PostPosted: Mon Aug 29, 2011 11:19 pm 
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Smashing detailed posting, awesome work guys, whilst not in the middle of a re-build, I used the info to strip and clean my son's XS, found it very helpful.....excellent posting.

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 Post subject: Re: Citori - Complete Receiver Tuneup - With Pics
PostPosted: Wed Oct 05, 2011 2:06 pm 
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yes a great review on how to strip down your gun and give it a good clean, but if you want a good clean and totally degreased in 2 minutes flush the inside out with a spray can of break cleaner, I've serviced many guns this way by flushing over a clean sheet of paper until the spray is clean, it evaporates in a few minutes leaving all the surfaces totally 100% clean, then for a very light mist of gun brunox and re build. job done.


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 Post subject: Re: Citori - Complete Receiver Tuneup - With Pics
PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2011 8:02 pm 
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uncle-buck wrote:
Bill -- Another excellent thread for Citori owners. I still use the firing pin maintenance thread you posted in 2006. For those who are interested, here is the link: viewtopic.php?t=89866&highlight=citori .
Thanks and Happy Independence Day! -- Bert


I figured it had to be the same guy. Nice job. Let me know when you do a Caesar Guerini.

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 Post subject: Re: Citori - Complete Receiver Tuneup - With Pics
PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2011 3:33 pm 
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Nicely done DIY!

Thanks,


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 Post subject: Re: Citori - Complete Receiver Tuneup - With Pics
PostPosted: Sun Dec 11, 2011 11:11 pm 
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Great write-up. Thanks!

One question. How does one go about removing the threaded stub of a broken hammer pin?

I completed tune ups on two BT-99s today and started in on my daughter's Special Trap Edition Citori. Much to our chagrin, the hammer pin for the top barrel is broken. :( I'll probably be talking to a local smith tomorrow.

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 Post subject: Re: Citori - Complete Receiver Tuneup - With Pics
PostPosted: Mon Dec 12, 2011 8:58 pm 
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WOW! You saved me $600, PER GUN. THANK YOU!!!




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