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 Post subject: Level 1 Instructor School
PostPosted: Wed Oct 27, 2010 7:30 am 
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Location: Virginia
I'm attending the L1 school soon, and was looking for any advise y'all can offer.

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 Post subject: Re: Level 1 Instructor School
PostPosted: Fri Oct 29, 2010 8:51 am 
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I took the level 1 for skeet a couple years ago. Keep an open mind. Don't go and shoot a registered event right after taking the class. I had too much info in my head and was trying to apply all had just learned and shoot. For me it did not work well. The information is now working well. Good Luck


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 Post subject: Re: Level 1 Instructor School
PostPosted: Fri Oct 29, 2010 11:32 am 
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Level 1 in skeet or sporting?


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 Post subject: Re: Level 1 Instructor School
PostPosted: Fri Oct 29, 2010 8:09 pm 
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shoreshot28 wrote:
Level 1 in skeet or sporting?

sporting

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 Post subject: Re: Level 1 Instructor School
PostPosted: Fri Oct 29, 2010 10:51 pm 
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I have taken both classes, skeet is a bit more structured as opposed to sporting clays. I am not sure if all sporting instructors run their classes in the exact same way, but be prepared to supply a student for yourself to teach on the second day. You won't necessarily teach the student you supply, but will switch off from one to the other with your other Level 1 candidates. Not as much emphasis on gun fit, but more on mount and different techniques to break targets as they are presented. You will need your gun and shells on the first day, at least a flat of shells depending on how many are in the class. You should have a lot of fun, and learn a great amount in only a couple of days. Good Luck! Have a blast!


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 Post subject: Re: Level 1 Instructor School
PostPosted: Sat Oct 30, 2010 7:16 pm 
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Thanks. I'm looking forward to it. I just had some minor fitments done on my citori in preparation for the class. I also worked with my shooting coach to overcome a problem I've been having. Fortunately, it was a simple eye dominance issue.

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 Post subject: Re: Level 1 Instructor School
PostPosted: Sun Oct 31, 2010 8:37 pm 
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I just finished the level one sporting with Bill Kempfer at Deep River in NC.

Itwas a very thorough course. Over the space of three days, we dealt with the entire manual and spent a great deal of time teaching new students.

There were 5 of us in the course. We spent the first day teaching each other how to shoot off the opposite shoulder to have us feel how new students would feel.

We then spent the next 2 days teaching either completely new students or quite inexperienced clay shooters. Some were experienced hunters, but not clay shooters. We had students from 10 yrs old to mid 40s, male and female. All in all we had about 10 - 15 students.

We each took turns teaching various students and watching each other teach. It was quite intense, but well worth the time. I learned a lot from Bill, but also from the other candidates. We ranged from master class to D class.

Bill moved in and out as we taught to point out stuff when a teachable moment came up. He was not easy on us, though he was fair. We had one student who was shooting off the wrong shoulder and had a poor gun fit that we had to jury rig with cardboard and electrical tape right in the field. A great hands on real life experience. We had several students, particularly kids who had mixed eye dominance, or a Bill calls it 'centre vision'.

On the afternoon of the third day, we wrote a closed book exam on instructing which wasn't as hard as I thought it would be, then an open book rules exam.

We all passed and are now NSCA Sporting Clays instructors level one as well as NSCA referees.

We all were certified, and are now level one instructors as well as NSCA referees.

In addition to the manual that you download and print from the web site, you will need a note book and the 2010 rule book. We didn't shoot all that much. I would guess less than 100 shells each.


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 Post subject: Re: Level 1 Instructor School
PostPosted: Sun Oct 31, 2010 10:04 pm 
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Doug The Canuck wrote:
I just finished the level one sporting with Bill Kempfer at Deep River in NC.

Itwas a very thorough course. Over the space of three days, we dealt with the entire manual and spent a great deal of time teaching new students.

There were 5 of us in the course. We spent the first day teaching each other how to shoot off the opposite shoulder to have us feel how new students would feel.

We then spent the next 2 days teaching either completely new students or quite inexperienced clay shooters. Some were experienced hunters, but not clay shooters. We had students from 10 yrs old to mid 40s, male and female. All in all we had about 10 - 15 students.

We each took turns teaching various students and watching each other teach. It was quite intense, but well worth the time. I learned a lot from Bill, but also from the other candidates. We ranged from master class to D class.

Bill moved in and out as we taught to point out stuff when a teachable moment came up. He was not easy on us, though he was fair. We had one student who was shooting off the wrong shoulder and had a poor gun fit that we had to jury rig with cardboard and electrical tape right in the field. A great hands on real life experience. We had several students, particularly kids who had mixed eye dominance, or a Bill calls it 'centre vision'.

On the afternoon of the third day, we wrote a closed book exam on instructing which wasn't as hard as I thought it would be, then an open book rules exam.

We all passed and are now NSCA Sporting Clays instructors level one as well as NSCA referees.

We all were certified, and are now level one instructors as well as NSCA referees.

In addition to the manual that you download and print from the web site, you will need a note book and the 2010 rule book. We didn't shoot all that much. I would guess less than 100 shells each.


Doug,

Thank you so much for the feedback. I tried to get into the Deep River school, but the one next month in South Carolina fit my schedule better. I guess I'd better read up a little on the rules and the manual.

If you have any other suggestions on how I might better prepare myself, I'm all ears.

Thanks again,
- Jimmy

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 Post subject: Re: Level 1 Instructor School
PostPosted: Mon Nov 01, 2010 5:43 am 
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Location: Barrie ON Canada
PastorJimmy wrote:
Doug The Canuck wrote:
I just finished the level one sporting with Bill Kempfer at Deep River in NC.

Itwas a very thorough course. Over the space of three days, we dealt with the entire manual and spent a great deal of time teaching new students.

There were 5 of us in the course. We spent the first day teaching each other how to shoot off the opposite shoulder to have us feel how new students would feel.

We then spent the next 2 days teaching either completely new students or quite inexperienced clay shooters. Some were experienced hunters, but not clay shooters. We had students from 10 yrs old to mid 40s, male and female. All in all we had about 10 - 15 students.

We each took turns teaching various students and watching each other teach. It was quite intense, but well worth the time. I learned a lot from Bill, but also from the other candidates. We ranged from master class to D class.

Bill moved in and out as we taught to point out stuff when a teachable moment came up. He was not easy on us, though he was fair. We had one student who was shooting off the wrong shoulder and had a poor gun fit that we had to jury rig with cardboard and electrical tape right in the field. A great hands on real life experience. We had several students, particularly kids who had mixed eye dominance, or a Bill calls it 'centre vision'.

On the afternoon of the third day, we wrote a closed book exam on instructing which wasn't as hard as I thought it would be, then an open book rules exam.

We all passed and are now NSCA Sporting Clays instructors level one as well as NSCA referees.

We all were certified, and are now level one instructors as well as NSCA referees.

In addition to the manual that you download and print from the web site, you will need a note book and the 2010 rule book. We didn't shoot all that much. I would guess less than 100 shells each.


Doug,

Thank you so much for the feedback. I tried to get into the Deep River school, but the one next month in South Carolina fit my schedule better. I guess I'd better read up a little on the rules and the manual.

If you have any other suggestions on how I might better prepare myself, I'm all ears.

Thanks again,
- Jimmy


Just go with an open mind and be prepared to work hard.


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 Post subject: Re: Level 1 Instructor School
PostPosted: Tue Nov 02, 2010 9:57 am 
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Joined: Fri Nov 23, 2007 9:11 pm
Posts: 434
I know when I took my level one, great emphasis was placed on being able to call a miss. Or in other words being able to diagnose a wrong first move, poor set up, incorrect sight picture, and the location of the shot in relation to the bird.

I would tell you to spend some time standing behind other shooters just watching their barrel movement and identifying shot placement. (though I would recommend not commenting on their misses)

I hate you didn't get in with Bill K. he truly is one of the great teachers. Yet Rick Smith will not be a disappointment...


christyouthguy


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 Post subject: Re: Level 1 Instructor School
PostPosted: Tue Nov 02, 2010 8:53 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2006 12:56 am
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Location: Virginia
christyouthguy wrote:
I know when I took my level one, great emphasis was placed on being able to call a miss. Or in other words being able to diagnose a wrong first move, poor set up, incorrect sight picture, and the location of the shot in relation to the bird.

I would tell you to spend some time standing behind other shooters just watching their barrel movement and identifying shot placement. (though I would recommend not commenting on their misses)

I hate you didn't get in with Bill K. he truly is one of the great teachers. Yet Rick Smith will not be a disappointment...


christyouthguy


I'm pretty comfortable calling shots. I coach our 4H team, and do 10 or 12 wingshooting workshops for beginners every year. I get pretty intimidated by the "really good" instructors though.

Thank you for the feedback.

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 Post subject: Re: Level 1 Instructor School
PostPosted: Tue Feb 01, 2011 9:15 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2006 12:56 am
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Location: Virginia
I attended the Level I instructor school last weekend at Live Oaks Sportsmen's Club in Swansea, SC with Rick Smith and Donny Roth. I learned a great deal from these guys, and can't imagine being mentored by any better. I think the biggest thing that I learned was not technique, or intellectual knowledge... rather, I learned a lot about myself.

This was by far the very best shotgun training I've attended in my 25 years in the sport. I'm looking forward to starting up our sporting clays training season this coming Sunday and seeing if my newfound skills will translate into higher scores for our youngsters.

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