It is currently Fri Feb 23, 2018 7:33 pm

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]


Image



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 33 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Adventures in learning the Hornady 366
PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2017 12:54 am 
*Proud to be a*
*Proud to be a*
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 21, 2005 8:42 pm
Posts: 24424
Location: Missouri
My friend Steve went to the Tulsa gun show about a year ago, and bought a Hornady 366 20 gauge loader for $380. He tried to get it to work, but no luck. He lent it to one of our shooting buddies, who is usually handy with a reloader, and he could not get it to work. So Steve borrowed my much beloved Ponsness Warren 375, which by golly works like a brand new Singer sewing machine, every time. It's slow, but it's certain.

By and by Steve thought that I might take a crack at fixing his 20 gauge 366. He came over one night last week, and we bolted it to a sturdy desk in the garage, and commenced to trying to get it to work. My wife was much amused, at our cussing and frustrations in trying to get shells loaded. The first evening was spent trying to straighten out bent shot and powder cut offs, which we did with some success. The powder bushing in the machine was supposed to toss 16 grains of Unique, but usually tossed about 16.5 grains. I had another smaller powder bushing, that threw an average of about 15.3 grains of Unique. We were, in the 366 reloader business now.

The Hornady 366 reloader has nine stations, and every one of them was out of adjustment, badly. The primer feed, did not feed primers reliably. The primer seater, did not seat primers reliably, and it hung up the press. The powder charger was the only thing that threw 15.3 grains of Unique, right on the money, every time we weighed a charge. The lead shot charger was a disaster, sometimes throwing a half a load, other times overfilling the case. And, the little hook to make the press progressive, did not work. It slipped off the turntable. The little wire that is supposed to push the loaded shells down a hole, pushed them off on the table.

I downloaded a manual. I read up on the internet, about problems and troubleshooting with the 366. I was delighted to read that Hornady has a lifetime warranty against defects in the 366. This would be easy, just like calling up RCBS to mooch new parts for my Grand.

I did manage to load a flat of shells with the 366, and Bladeswitcher and I shot on Christmas Eve. I shot three boxes, and one of them had tape over the ends to hold in the shot. Many of them, would not fit my Stevens 311 I was using for a test gun for the loads. But, they all went off, but one, and I'd checked and if a case is double charged, the wad sticks up out of the hull at the shot station.

The day after Christmas, I called Hornady, bright and early. The lady was very nice. I went through the press and requested various parts, like I do my RCBS Grand. She was very helpful, and knew a lot about the 366, but after my list was completed she asked for $143. When I asked about the lifetime warranty, she said the things I listed were "wear parts" and the press was not defective. I like Steve a lot, but not enough to spend $143 on his 366 reloader. So I cut the list down to springs, powder seals, and those little sheet metal cut offs for the powder and the shot, and a new hook for the thing that's supposed to hook the turntable and make the press progressive. Only $25 for it all, and Merry Christmas to Steve. This became a quest to get this gadget to work.

This afternoon after work, I went to work trying to get the 366 working again. I started at the first station, and went through all nine stations, and found a piece of black tape in the shot bushing, that was the reason for inconsistent powder charges. Then, I bent the plate that holds the hook, and the press started progressive reloading, finally.

Steve came over, and loaded up about a flat of shells with it, and we didn't have too many mishaps. There were small adjustments made to most of the stations, but the press works pretty well now. We'll have $25 worth of spare parts, when they arrive.

I learned some things about progressive reloaders.

First, the ability to take the shells off the press at each station, is priceless. I would never buy a progressive press without that feature.

Second, I will never, ever, cuss my RCBS Grand again. True, it has plastic parts, but those parts are free, postage and all, when they break, and I have lots of spares. It doesn't powder a case, when there is no shell in that station, and it does not put shot in a hull, when there is not a hull under the shot station. And, I've used it for a decade, and know how to adjust the dies, which is the most important part of a progressive reloader,,,the learning curve.

Third, the Hornady manual for the 366 is really bad. It's better than nothing, but I had to learn by trial and error, and lots of trials, and lots of errors, and lots of spilled shot and powder. Buying a used Hornady 366 is NOT something for the folks that don't have patience, and are not willing to fiddle and mess with a gadget to get it to work.

Fourth, once it's all set up and adjusted, the Hornady 366 is a good progressive reloader, but you have to work it slow, and it's hard to push the lever down, at least the way we have it set up.

Fifth, I'm loading up every twenty gauge hull I have on this thing, then giving it back to Steve, and reclaiming my Ponsness Warren 375. Steve ought to take it back to the Tulsa gun show and sell the thing to somebody else. I don't shoot all that many twenty gauge shells, and those I do, I can load on my PW 375, about four boxes an hour.

And if I can ever get the top of my 12 gauge Grand unscrewed, I might buy a 20 gauge conversion kit for the Grand.

I don't want any more adventures, with a Hornady 366.

I'm sure a lot of folks like the machine, or they'd not have sold them for about forty years, but I'm not a fan, by any means, of the 366.



_________________
I have never considered a difference of opinion in politics, in religion, in philosophy, as a reason for withdrawing from a friend. Thomas Jefferson


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Adventures in learning the Hornady 366
PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2017 8:26 am 
*Proud to be a*
*Proud to be a*
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jul 20, 2009 1:54 pm
Posts: 7705
Location: Kansas
My 20 ga RCBS Grand spits out loads of perfectly loaded Shells effortlessly. You won’t regret it.

_________________
"We pulled the trigger, the safety went forward, both barrels fired almost together, the gun opened, ejectors kicked the fired cases over our shoulder ...the most completely automatic gun we ever fired" Elmer Keith- Shotguns by Keith


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Adventures in learning the Hornady 366
PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2017 9:40 am 
*Proud to be a*
*Proud to be a*

Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2013 10:25 am
Posts: 3583
Location: Annapolis, MD
I can see how adjusting a 366 for the first time could be frustrating, especially one as out of adjustment and abused as the one you worked on (bent shutoff plate? wtf?). The easiest way to adjust it is to loosen all the dies, run them up and start from the first station, the resizing die. All else flows from there. Adjust them one at a time, in sequence. A bent finger on the pawl will cause auto advance problems (I keep a spare). There is an online article entitled "40 years with the Hornady 366" that is useful. For me, the most challenging adjustment is the swing-out wad guide (unless you know about the "e-clip" on the rod underneath the platen, almost impossible to see unless you know it's there).

_________________
Ceteris paribus, of course.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Adventures in learning the Hornady 366
PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2017 10:32 am 
*Proud to be a*
*Proud to be a*
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2003 3:37 pm
Posts: 17550
SuperXOne wrote:

The lead shot charger was a disaster, sometimes throwing a half a load, other times overfilling the case.
...

This afternoon after work, I went to work trying to get the 366 working again. I started at the first station, and went through all nine stations, and found a piece of black tape in the shot bushing, that was the reason for inconsistent powder (shot???) charges. Then, I bent the plate that holds the hook, and the press started progressive reloading, finally.

...

I'm sure a lot of folks like the machine, or they'd not have sold them for about forty years, but I'm not a fan, by any means, of the 366.


It's obvious that the previous owner didn't know squat about how the 366 works and tried to "fix" it with black tape and ended up bending the plate advancing pawl among other things. I doubt that he actually USED the 366 enough to wear out any of the parts, but no doubt ABUSED it plenty during his ownership. Fortunately, the 366 is built like a tank and the damageable parts are few and easily replaced if necessary.

Nope, the 366 is not intended for heavy handed idiots to own or operate. I had no difficulty at all in following the Owner's Manual in getting mine set up properly 25 years ago. Once set up properly, I loaded on it for 20 years or more with almost ZERO problems and only occasional need for adjustment. In fact, it was rather boring in its dependability. I felt like the Maytag Repairman who kept waiting for something to break, but it just kept right on ticking.

I would be using it today except that I decided to give up reloading 2 or 3 years ago and just buy all my ammo.

_________________
Please post For Sale items in the proper Classified section.

Semi-Auto Classifieds is ONLY for Complete Semi-Auto shotguns.
Over/Under Classifieds is ONLY for Complete O/U shotguns.
Items other than a complete shotgun go in OTHER Classifieds.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Adventures in learning the Hornady 366
PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2017 10:42 am 
Tournament Grade

Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2012 9:28 am
Posts: 184
Location: Ohio
Ulysses,

+1 for me as well!

I have 3 presses and they just keep trucking on.

Ken

_________________
Bird dog guy.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Adventures in learning the Hornady 366
PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2017 12:12 pm 
*Proud to be a*
*Proud to be a*
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 21, 2005 8:42 pm
Posts: 24424
Location: Missouri
Let me praise the 366 for a minute.

Once I figured out, the swing out wad guide spring had to adjusted to exactly the proper height on the shaft, and the spring twisted so that it gave enough push the wad guide to line up over the hull,,,,it worked better than my Grand or any other wad guide I've ever used.

The press is made from cast iron, and it's a rugged, heavy duty, unit. The only plastic parts I could see were the primer holder, the primer dispenser tip, the spent primer holder cup, and the wad guide.

The two items giving me and the previous two guys the most fits were the inconsistent shot drops, and the primer seating adjustment. The hidden piece of black electrical tape inside the 7/8 shot bushing was the entire cause of the inconsistent shot drops, probably placed there to get more room in the hull, because the powder bushing was tossing two much powder, and the wad seat was too high, not seating the wads on the powder. The primer seating problem was only a matter of setting the bottom of the primer seat to where a primer was just below the steel bushing, then adjusting the depth using the tube, and making sure the "teardrop" on the top of the steel primer seat bushing was placed with the tail of the teardrop to the right. Fixing the shot drops and the primer seating, made me fell about like I'd gained the summit of Mount Everest. Once fixed, they gave no more trouble. The primers hanging up the turntable were the worst problem, and the inconsistent shot drops were only occasional, whenever the black tape would block the shot from entering.

The machine is very well made, to rigid, precise tolerances. That's both a good, and a bad thing. If you adjust the machine to load Remington hulls, and feed it good hulls, it works very well. Try using bad hulls, especially those sorry two piece AA hulls, and it doesn't work so well. One piece of lead shot in the wrong place, shuts down operations. The Grand and the PW 375 are more forgiving of bad hulls and occasional pieces of shot.

90% of the problems we were having with the 366 were due to ignorance of ourselves, and previous owner(s). I could fix this press again, in nothing flat. The learning curve is key to operating any progressive press.

And if I wanted to convert this press to another gauge, the top is secured by only two 9/16" bolts. The Grand has three allen head screws, that I can't budge.

But if I ever do get the top off my 12 gauge Grand, I'm buying a 20 gauge conversion head for it, and let Steve mess with this 366.

I may forget what a chore getting the 366 to run was, but not soon, not very soon.:)

_________________
I have never considered a difference of opinion in politics, in religion, in philosophy, as a reason for withdrawing from a friend. Thomas Jefferson


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Adventures in learning the Hornady 366
PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2017 1:10 pm 
*Proud to be a*
*Proud to be a*
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2003 3:37 pm
Posts: 17550
The problem with the "primers hanging up the turntable" were due to one thing... raising the handle too fast.

As you raise the handle, the plate turns in a counterclockwise direction. The primer which was just dropped on the down stroke is advanced to the next station by this turning plate and has to drop into the small recess at the next station where it will be pressed into the de-primed hull on the next pull of the handle.

If you are raising the handle too fast, the primer doesn't get completely dropped into that recess and it becomes pinched between the recess and the shell plate. If this happens, just ease off the upward pressure on the handle and let the primer drop down into the recess. Then you can complete the up stroke. Sometimes you may need to flip up the advancing pawl and rotate the plate backward (clockwise) about 1/8" to allow the primer to drop in place. Most of the time this won't be necessary though. Don't forget to put the advancing pawl back down before pulling the handle again.

Just keep in mind SLOW AND STEADY when operating the handle and everything will work fine. When you get in a hurry, you'll start pinching these primers as you have discovered.

_________________
Please post For Sale items in the proper Classified section.

Semi-Auto Classifieds is ONLY for Complete Semi-Auto shotguns.
Over/Under Classifieds is ONLY for Complete O/U shotguns.
Items other than a complete shotgun go in OTHER Classifieds.


Last edited by Ulysses on Thu Dec 28, 2017 1:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Adventures in learning the Hornady 366
PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2017 1:14 pm 
*Proud to be a*
*Proud to be a*
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jul 20, 2009 1:54 pm
Posts: 7705
Location: Kansas
No such animal as the perfect reloading machine. Each design has its strengths and weaknesses. I never used a 366, but it looks like the shells are locked in at several of the stations, and I would not like that. I want the ability to pull out a hull at any station at any time in the event that I need to correct something. While I own two RCBS Grand machines, and like them very much, they also have their gremlins. Nothing is perfect. For the money I would have to say that MEC has come very close to getting it right, although you will get arguments about that as well. I also own 9000s and Sizemasters. While not progressive, in my opinion, the Sizemaster is about as close to perfect as you can get. But this is about the 366, and I don't own one, but it was interesting in reading about it.

_________________
"We pulled the trigger, the safety went forward, both barrels fired almost together, the gun opened, ejectors kicked the fired cases over our shoulder ...the most completely automatic gun we ever fired" Elmer Keith- Shotguns by Keith


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Adventures in learning the Hornady 366
PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2017 1:52 pm 
*Proud to be a*
*Proud to be a*
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 21, 2005 8:42 pm
Posts: 24424
Location: Missouri
Ulysses wrote:
The problem with the "primers hanging up the turntable" were due to one thing... raising the handle too fast.

As you raise the handle, the plate turns in a counterclockwise direction. The primer which was just dropped on the down stroke is advanced to the next station by this turning plate and has to drop into the small recess at the next station where it will be pressed into the de-primed hull on the next pull of the handle.

If you are raising the handle too fast, the primer doesn't get completely dropped into that recess and it becomes pinched between the recess and the shell plate. If this happens, just ease off the upward pressure on the handle and let the primer drop down into the recess. Then you can complete the up stroke. Sometimes you may need to flip up the advancing pawl and rotate the plate backward (clockwise) about 1/8" to allow the primer to drop in place. Most of the time this won't be necessary though. Don't forget to put the advancing pawl back down before pulling the handle again.

Just keep in mind SLOW AND STEADY when operating the handle and everything will work fine. When you get in a hurry, you'll start pinching these primers as you have discovered.


It was only after in sheer frustration, I put the metal plate that advances the turntable into a vice, and bent the thing in the middle, then bent the hook with pliers, did I finally get the 336 to be able to run too fast to load the primers. All the early troubles we were having with the primers hanging up the press were remedied, entirely, by making sure the teardrop was with the tail to the right.

For those who don't own one, let's go through the stations.

Station one is the decapper and sizer. It has to be adjusted first, because that stops the downward stroke of the press. And, this sizer is NOT on the turntable. It looks like the first models didn't have a sizer, and were like the MEC 650 Progressive loaders. But if the hull is too far from specs, if you don't resize the hull, it will hang up the turntable later on, just like it hung up my 311 20 gauge, trying to put poorly sized shells into the chambers.

So pull the lever, chunk, the case is deprimed, the spent primer falls in a plastic tube below the press, pull off the deprimed hull, place it in station two.

Station two is a non resizing decapper. The decapping rod can be too far down, and make the press hard to run. I suppose it's for folks that shoot all their hulls in one gun, and don't want to resize their hulls.

Now is the tricky part. The turntable spins to the right, either by hand if the advance pawl isn't working, or by the little hook on the pawl, if it does work. To the right of of station two, are holes in the turntable, that accept a primer from the primer feed tube. It takes some adjustment, but soon enough the primers go into that little hole virtually every time. There's no primer shut off, and while the primer holder on top of a tall tube holds 100 primers, the tube does not, and the prime holder has to have a wheel turned to drop primers. But it holds something over 30 primers in the tube, and after a while you learn to keep feeding the primer tube.

Each time the press goes down, it drops a primer in that little hole between station two and three.

Then the primer has to slide over to the right, and drop into the hole in the primer seating bushing. Steve's press is an early one, where the teardrop shape can go 360 degrees inside the hole. The Hornady lady said the newer presses have a slot on the back and a nib in the bushing to keep the teardrop pointed with the tail to the right. This is what was giving our buddy, and Steve, and me fits, even though we were carefully turning the turntable by hand. It makes sense to have the tail of the teardrop to the left, so that the primers can slide in on a slant. But friends, that is exactly the wrong way, to turn that teardrop. Turn the teardrop to the right, and then when a primed hull tries to go to the right, it can slide over the beveled tail of the teardrop and go to the right.

After the machine is set on progressive, then you have to work the lever slowly, or else the primers will not drop into the primer seating bushing straight. And if the smallest piece of shot gets down in the primer bushing, it messes up the priming, and you have to advance or back off the turntable, to push the metal priming bushing down and flick off the shot using something like the end of needle nosed pliers.

Once it works, the priming works great. Until then, it's rather frustrating, and caused my wife no end of merriment laughing at me trying to get it working.

And, the 366 has no conscience. It will always drop primers, lead and powder, unless you shut off the powder and shot tubes, and remove the primer. I read where the earliest versions of the Pacific 366 didn't have shot and powder cut offs. What fun wives must have had, watching husbands trying to deal with that.

Somebody named Deitmeyer invented the Pacific 366.

He was a clever old machinist, no doubt.

But Pacific and Hornady were even more clever, selling these gadgets by the thousands for over forty years.

Once set up, if you are careful, the 366 will load shells so fast it takes one man to keep the operator in primers, box the shells, and occasionally load shot and powder.

But you must be careful, deliberate, and not force anything.

Or else shot spills and wives laugh, and you have to chase down every, tiny, little bit of shot out of the gadget, before you start going again.

_________________
I have never considered a difference of opinion in politics, in religion, in philosophy, as a reason for withdrawing from a friend. Thomas Jefferson


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Adventures in learning the Hornady 366
PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2017 2:05 pm 
Crown Grade

Joined: Sat Mar 12, 2016 10:39 pm
Posts: 2318
I was the third person to try to get a 366 up and running.

Two brothers had bought it (presumably new). How much it had been tinkered with, I have no idea. They handed it off to a friend, who failed to get it working. He passed it on to me and I, too, failed. I sent it on to another friend, who also failed and no longer has it.

Keep in mind, this wasn't a challenge to show one's aptitude by solving a mechanical puzzle--it was nothing more than the opportunity to help a friend in exchange for the possible use of this deluxe loader.

After about three shot spills and their lengthy clean-ups, I decided I could load shells faster on my old Savage machine and passed the 366 on to the next guy.

That experience taught me that I don't shoot enough to justify a 366 or anything like it, especially since 12 gauge factory shells are selling for the same price they did 25 years ago. My current dust-gathering loader is a MEC 600 Jr.

_________________
The root(s) of all evil:
-Political Correctness
-Insurance
-Securitization
Take your pick.

Always make an even number of mistakes. One may cancel out another.

"People who enjoy meetings should not be in charge of anything." --Thomas Sowell


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Adventures in learning the Hornady 366
PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2017 2:21 pm 
*Proud to be a*
*Proud to be a*
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 21, 2005 8:42 pm
Posts: 24424
Location: Missouri
Zbigniew wrote:
I was the third person to try to get a 366 up and running.

Two brothers had bought it (presumably new). How much it had been tinkered with, I have no idea. They handed it off to a friend, who failed to get it working. He passed it on to me and I, too, failed. I sent it on to another friend, who also failed and no longer has it.

Keep in mind, this wasn't a challenge to show one's aptitude by solving a mechanical puzzle--it was nothing more than the opportunity to help a friend in exchange for the possible use of this deluxe loader.

After about three shot spills and their lengthy clean-ups, I decided I could load shells faster on my old Savage machine and passed the 366 on to the next guy.

That experience taught me that I don't shoot enough to justify a 366 or anything like it, especially since 12 gauge factory shells are selling for the same price they did 25 years ago. My current dust-gathering loader is a MEC 600 Jr.


It makes me feel better, knowing others have experienced the frustrations of trying to set up the 366.

But should ever a fair haired youth should find this passage, trying to set up his 366, I can offer these pointers, from bitter, yet successful experience.

Load up a little powder, and a little shot, and NO primers, in each hopper. Lift the pawl that advances the turntable up so you spin the turntable by hand.

Start with the first station, the resizer. This has to be put in proper adjustment FIRST. It controls the height of all the other eight stations, and this machine is precisely made, and forgives no transgressions.

Then go to the right, around the stations, setting up the eight stations. Make double sure the teardrop on the primer seat bushing has it's little tail to the right. Make sure and measure about ten powder drops. Don't go on to the next station, until the previous stations are perfectly adjusted.

Feed the machine only good, Remington hulls. I suppose you could use AA's, but don't. The Remington hulls are more consistent, load easier, and don't deform as badly.

After you think you have it running, then you have to fine tune all the stations, because each time you adjust one, it may make a tiny change in the others,,,except that first station that bottoms out and resizes the hull.

Go slow. Get into a rhythm. After a while you'll crank out shells as fast as you can put on a wad, remove the hull from one to two, and add a new hull to the decapper on station one. It helps to push the old hull up on the decapper.

Better yet, buy an RCBS Grand, to start with.

They forgive poor operators, and bad hulls, and mistakes, a lot more than a 366 does.

Your wife will still laugh at you, but not as often.

_________________
I have never considered a difference of opinion in politics, in religion, in philosophy, as a reason for withdrawing from a friend. Thomas Jefferson


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Adventures in learning the Hornady 366
PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2017 3:03 pm 
*Proud to be a*
*Proud to be a*
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2003 3:37 pm
Posts: 17550
Super,

It sounds like you've got the hard part figured out. The rest of it is just minor adjustments to the crimp which are pretty straightforward.

Yep, you've got to keep in mind that the shot and powder WILL drop with every pull of the handle if you don't have them shutoff. It's a simple matter to shut either or both of them off, but first you must remember to do it. :)

Also, as you pointed out, the primer will drop a primer with every pull of the handle. If you're going to be working on or adjusting the shot or powder drops and don't want a primer, just empty the primer tube or put a piece of tape over the bottom end of it. The tape won't last forever, but it will last for perhaps 20 to 30 drops which is often enough time to fix or adjust whatever it is you're working on.

As for that little wire that kicks the finished shell down the hole, just use a screwdriver to adjust its position to where it works well. Once adjusted, it stays adjusted. Again, the key to reducing or eliminating problems is a smooth, steady operation of the handle.... both up and down.

_________________
Please post For Sale items in the proper Classified section.

Semi-Auto Classifieds is ONLY for Complete Semi-Auto shotguns.
Over/Under Classifieds is ONLY for Complete O/U shotguns.
Items other than a complete shotgun go in OTHER Classifieds.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Adventures in learning the Hornady 366
PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2017 4:03 pm 
*Proud to be a*
*Proud to be a*

Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2013 10:25 am
Posts: 3583
Location: Annapolis, MD
I have my primer drop tube modified with a slot milled through the bottom letting me see when the primers are getting low and letting me shut them off with a pin.

My 366 is of a newer vintage with an index pin in the primer cup so it always orients the "teardrop" in the correct direction.

And your older one may have a shorter primer tube than the newer ones. Mine holds ~75 primers.

I have found a bent shell plate to be my nemesis. If one of the tabs gets bent upwards, and I don't know how it happens, it will cause a primer to catch under the shell plate on the way to the primer cup.

And I don't agree with the OP about the AAHS hulls, I have no problem with them. In fact, I have no problems with any type of hulls. The problems usually involve inconsistent hull length and what I do is cull some of the short ones and long ones. I adjust the height of the wad guide to the long ones and adjust the crimp start and crimp dies to the short ones (eliminates the holes) and live with the swirls on the long ones.

Many have problems with the stack height on the AAs and try to adjust their way out of it; can't be done. You have to use either different wads or powders to get the stack height correct and once you do, the finished shells come out looking beautiful.

I have Jim Skeel's large shot and powder hoppers and once I get going, I only stop for more primers until the bag of shot and pound of powder are used up.

_________________
Ceteris paribus, of course.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Adventures in learning the Hornady 366
PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2017 4:05 pm 
*Proud to be a*
*Proud to be a*

Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2013 10:25 am
Posts: 3583
Location: Annapolis, MD
Ulysses wrote:
Yep, you've got to keep in mind that the shot and powder WILL drop with every pull of the handle if you don't have them shutoff. It's a simple matter to shut either or both of them off, but first you must remember to do it. :)

This causes problems in the other direction, foregetting to turn them back on (don't ask me how I know this).

_________________
Ceteris paribus, of course.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Adventures in learning the Hornady 366
PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2017 4:19 pm 
*Proud to be a*
*Proud to be a*
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2003 3:37 pm
Posts: 17550
Nebs wrote:
Ulysses wrote:
Yep, you've got to keep in mind that the shot and powder WILL drop with every pull of the handle if you don't have them shutoff. It's a simple matter to shut either or both of them off, but first you must remember to do it. :)

This causes problems in the other direction, foregetting to turn them back on (don't ask me how I know this).


I quickly learned that any time I had to stop the reloading process for anything, I always did a complete check to make sure I had a hull in each station, primers in the tube, shot and powder turned on, etc before pulling the handle to start back up. It takes only a few seconds to do that complete checklist, but can take a half hour (maybe longer) to clean up a mess if you forget to do it. Or you might load up several boxes of shells before discovering that you forgot to turn the powder back on. Bummer! :D

_________________
Please post For Sale items in the proper Classified section.

Semi-Auto Classifieds is ONLY for Complete Semi-Auto shotguns.
Over/Under Classifieds is ONLY for Complete O/U shotguns.
Items other than a complete shotgun go in OTHER Classifieds.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Adventures in learning the Hornady 366
PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2017 8:39 pm 
Diamond Grade
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2005 11:49 pm
Posts: 1082
Location: New Mexico
Well evidently you guys don't know how to dance the waltz. It is 1,2,3,4.

The 366 is 1,2,3,4. Just like the waltz.
1. insert hull in resizer, move existing hull to deacapper.
2. Check for proper primer drop.
3. Put wad in wad guide.
4. Pull the damn handle slowly.

Then repeat!

_________________
Red Beard Wrote "None had occurred within our borders BEFORE W either. So what?"

"It's Obama's fault!!!!! " Beau Ouville Posted: Sat Aug 29, 2015 6:56 am


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Adventures in learning the Hornady 366
PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2017 9:45 pm 
*Proud to be a*
*Proud to be a*
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 17, 2008 11:16 pm
Posts: 7268
Location: Pacific Northwest
The 366 may be built like a tank, but needs to be handled like a classy lady! Once you figure that out, you're home free.

I have four 366s in 12, 20, 28 and .410. They all work smoothly and produce first-rate shells. Obviously, the first owner of the 366 in this post manhandled it crudely and the result was predictable. When you find a 366 with bent parts, you need to go back to square one. Set up each station in order and fix any problems as you find them.

Finally, proper lubrication of the 366 is essential and if that aspect is neglected, it will not operate smoothly.

Oh, and over the years I have bought and set up about a dozen 366s; mostly for resale...never paid more then $250 for one and that was in near-new condition. Hearing that someone paid $380 for one that was badly abused hurts.

_________________
NSSA Level 1 Instructor

Romans 8:1


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Adventures in learning the Hornady 366
PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2017 11:36 pm 
*Proud to be a*
*Proud to be a*

Joined: Wed Dec 14, 2005 8:03 pm
Posts: 2902
Location: Mid-Missouri
SuperX, give our friend Dave F a call. I believe he loads on a Hornady. He may be able to coach you on it.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Adventures in learning the Hornady 366
PostPosted: Fri Dec 29, 2017 7:34 am 
Crown Grade

Joined: Sun Jan 02, 2011 4:06 pm
Posts: 3434
+1 on what oldskeeter,says.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Adventures in learning the Hornady 366
PostPosted: Fri Dec 29, 2017 11:48 am 
Diamond Grade

Joined: Fri Jun 11, 2004 7:09 pm
Posts: 1224
Location: South Central Pa.
Hello All:

If one is having problems with the Hornady 366, may I make a few suggestions:

Download the instruction book available from Hornady for free.

Carefully follow the instructions. Each adjustment is very well detailed.

If need, call Hornady as they have great assistance available.

Take your time and THINK about what you are doing at ALL times.

In my humble opinion, the 366 is the "Best Buy" in the shot shell reloading machine on the market. Once adjusted, there will be no more need for tweaks and constant adjustments in the future, These machines are constructed to hold adjustments and last a very long time.

If you are capable typing and posting here on SW, adjusting and using the 366 will be a simple task.

Good luck,

Leomat




Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 33 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Registered users: 375shooter, B.L.E., Bad English, Basstar, bigbluedodge, Bing [Bot], Bladeswitcher, Bob_K, butch32, captjsjr, cbradford, ccL, Cedar, copdills, Curly N, dandennis, dickgtax, Diddle, Dmc57, drawdc, drcook, eastbank, eiderz, Elviscolt, Ezra Smack, floridaford, from_the_plaines, Gadwall, golda5, Google [Bot], Google Feedfetcher, heelerman, idsktshtr, Jason Johnson, jaybird75, Joeracer44, John H, johnnymose, kenhartshorn, Keperkey, leomat, LG, Majestic-12 [Bot], mholting, nanuk, Nebs, oneeyednine1029, oregunner, P.Muerrle, pennahunter, pintail_drake2004, rbjammin, rchaffee, Researcher01, riceducker, Riverman2, Rooster booster, saskbooknut, scottyhammond, simsy9, skeetshooter83617, smkilcz59, stano65, Steve Y, SuperXOne, Tanasimtn, TEH, trdjohn, Valdemar, Vette Jockey, WCJ, wiscowoody05, wyobirds


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Jump to:  
© 2017 Carbon Media Group Outdoors    - DMCA Notice