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 Post subject: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Sat Jul 21, 2007 5:37 am 
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Joined: Sat Apr 28, 2007 7:09 am
Posts: 200
Mods Please Sticky. The advice below I collected over the years from dealing with old school Remington gunsmiths and is valuable information. Thank you.


Re: 1100 longevity, my first 12 ga 1100 receiver lasted almost 20 yrs of hard, registered shooting (over 50,000 rds since 1981) ; plus easily four times that number in non-registered practice shooting. 250,000 rds is a conservative estimate. It was probably closer to 300,000 rds.

The magazine tube finally broke off the receiver one day when I took apart that 1100 to clean it. It's barrel lasted another three years and probably 25,000 to 30,000 rds after the receiver was junked, before its extension developed a hairline crack near the locking lug recess.

It's bolt lasted another two seasons beyond that before it, too developed a crack near the extractor recess. The original 1981 firing pin after 300,000 estimated rounds is still going strong, though I have probably replaced two dozen firing pin RETRACTOR SPRINGS that broke around the pin during all that time.

The trick to 1100 longevity is as follows:

1. Change the action spring in the stock every 10,000 rds
(some say 5,000, but I've been getting 20-25 yrs of service life
going every 10,000) This is far more important than changing the buffer disc at the back of the bolt and prevents bolt to receiver impact (from the spring tension offering resistance
against the bolt's reward travel) A new action spring is 15" long from the factory before it is installed and compressed. 14-1/2" means - it's time to replace.

2. GREASE the top, exterior surface of the barrel extension
doing this, forms a cheap, "gel" cushion that soaks up the metal to metal impact of the top of the barrel extension against
the inner surface of the receiver top caused by vibrations during firing.


3. Grease the bottom flat surface of the outside of the barrel that presses against the foream support (spring steel bushing)
doing so will DOUBLE the service life of that fragile part.

4. Grease the surfaces of the receiver where the forend support bites into - again reduces some wear and soaks up vibrations

5. After about 100,000 rounds - switch to a locking lug marked with an etched "L" (for large, or long). This takes up the space worn by the friction of the standard lug against the barrel extension over time. Once that recess becomes sufficiently worn, you will get more "peen" impact of the locking lug as its fit becomes loosened and is allowed to whack the barrel extension harder due to the increased space it has to move in.
Once you do this, you're good for about another 100,000 rds
after that, you may need a new barrel. Tell tale signs of worn locking lug recesses include: primers backing out of factory shells. I've worn at least two barrels this way and have replaced a few for other people as well over the years.

6. Inspect the gas cylinder for "ridge burrs" Ridge burrs form from the ring friction from the action bar sleeve driving everything home, hard. Smoothing them out, carefully prevents "train wrecking" of the action bar/action bar sleeve/bolt assembly - all that inertia driven by the action spring slamming the piston and piston seal, home into the "collar" or more properly, GAS CYLINDER - driving the rings into the cylinder - hard - and then having the rings get "tripped up" on ridge burrs that formed inside the gas cylinder. Smoothing out those burrs - will DOUBLE the service life of the piston and piston seal.

7.DO NOT make a habit of using STEEL WOOL or metal abrasives on the magazine tube to clean it. Doing so, WILL over time, reduce the OD (outside diameter) of the mag tube enough to cause, loose ring fit and hence, GAS LOSS leading to irreparable functioning problems. Instead, use rags and solvents, wipe dry and put a drop or two of BREAK FREE on the tube. If you have enough caked on crud to scrape off, use a PLASTIC edged tool, like a disposable plastic picnic knife or other similar NON METAL MARRING plastic tool (expired cut up credit card or something) to scrape carbon residue from the tube.


8. ALWAYS put ONE drop of BREAK FREE or similar lube on the center of the firing pin spring where it is stressed the most.

9. Using a Q-TIP - NOT your fingers - GREASE the underside, flat surfaces of the receiver rails that contact the front part of the link (the "wing" part of the link) Doing this will reduce friction wear and lengthen service life of both the link, and the receiver. Also, new links should be polished, deburred and lubed to prevent burr "snags" during cycling-which leads to broken links and greasing the rails reduces friction wear and the thinning out of the rails which, over time, allows for more MOVEMENT of the link during the firing cycle, which leads to premature link breakage


10. Lube the white spots on the action bar and grease the "fracture point" on the right leg of the action bar.

Replace the link if not broken - after 5,000 shots before entering a serious tournament; replace the firing pin retractor spring at 5,000; the extractor at 10,000, the action spring at 10,000, the piston rings at 5,000 and the forend supports and
rubber vitron barrel seal at 3,000 rds to enhance reliability.

Also, when removing the recoil pad, stock or action spring - DO NOT bear down with your weight against the butt, and the mag tube end against the floor - that will stress the mag tube and lead to prematurely separating the mag tube from the receiver, causing it to be junked.

Following these proven steps along with regular cleaning, and your 1100 is highly unlikely to break down on the line. Mine has not broken down at a trap shoot in over ten years.

The 1100 can outlast a Perazzi or K-80 between parts breakages and will be on the spot repairable in minutes if not, seconds.

Tips acquired over 20 yrs from Remington gunsmiths, service techs and employee-shooters at the Grand and the old Remington Gun Club to include: Amerigo Pagliaroli(fmr mgr: Remington Gun Club & CTA Hall of Fame), "Tex" Cavaina(Sr. Remington 1100 gunsmith); the late Floyd "Jiggs" Cochran (Remington ballistician; CTA Hall of Fame); the late Dick Baldwin, (ATA Hall of Fame) and Daniel Buhan, (fmr trap mechanic of the Remington Gun Club & 1100 shooter) among others.




Last edited by northeastm1a on Sat Sep 08, 2007 6:31 am, edited 2 times in total.

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 Post subject: re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Sat Jul 21, 2007 5:39 am 
Tournament Grade

Joined: Sat Apr 28, 2007 7:09 am
Posts: 200
Another observation re: bolt buffer discs: white is standard and black was used in 1100 Magnum and Trap-T tournaments.
Reportedly made of a more durable plastic.

Remington will ship you the black ones if you specify when calling their parts order line.

They will also ship you the traditional two piece, gas piston and piston seal if you specify. These work better on older 1100 mag tubes

Also when ordering extractors for any of the 3+ million 1100s made during the DuPont years (pre 11-87 era); order the 870 extractor. If you fail to specify, they will ship you the thicker
11-87 extractor (the new "default" part used on current 1100s)which will not fit in the old style 1100 bolt, nor the old style 1100 barrel extractor cut-out.


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 Post subject: re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2007 10:11 am 
Tournament Grade

Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 8:58 am
Posts: 157
northeastm1a,

Let me be the first to thank you for this tremendous service. I thought I knew just about everything to know about running my 1187, until reading your report.

I do have a couple of questions however. How does one replace the plastic bolt buffer in the back of the receiver? Also how often should this be replaced?

Does your caution about using steel wool to clean the magazine tube apply also to the 1187, which has a stainless steel tube? Also would this apply to the finest 0000 steel wool as well?

Thanks 20 ga.


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 Post subject: re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2007 8:57 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 28, 2007 7:09 am
Posts: 200
First, it is much more important to change the action spring than the buffer disc. The resistance offered by the spring tension is what slows the bolt speed in its reward travel.

Typically the buffer disc need not be changed until it shatters.

With changing action springs once every 10,000 shots (or even more frequently if heavy loads are used) in 25 years of shooting, totalling 300,000 rds (50,000+ ATA registered)
I have managed to shatter ONE bolt buffer disc.

Quite literally, I have worn rails down on two 1100 receivers, broke the magazine tube from one of them; wore through two bolt locking lugs (breaking one off at the head) and cracked one barrel extension after 20 years before shattering a buffer disc.

To change it, you first drift out the firing pin retaining pin, remove the firing pin and spring, then gently push and pry
the buffer disc with a fine bladed screwdriver until it pops free.

The new buffer disc will be shipped WITHOUT a hole drilled through it to allow the firing pin retaining pin to pass through.

You will need to drill the hole, or simply give it to a Remington authorized repair gunsmith to do it for you.

Re: steel wool, infrequent use will not hurt, but if used often, like every weekend, for example, you will over time, abrade away just enough steel from the tube to cause functioning problems. I have seen a few 1100s that would not reliably cycle with light loads for doubles, whose tubes were scoured with steel wool regularly over a period of years. Those few guns
all had loose, wobbly fitting rings that fit snugly on my 1100s mag tubes.

Best advice is to avoid steel wool - it will become habit forming.
Instead, clean the gun as soon as is practical with solvents, cloths, wipe dry, lightly lube and you won't ever have that problem. Again, use a plastic tool that cannot marr metal to scrape stubborn deposits.

This also holds true for hard, stainless steel gas cylinder brushes. Use them RARELY. When I was a teenager - I ruined the gas cylinder on one barrel that would never function for doubles because I cleaned it three or four times per week - after shooting 30 boxes of shells per week and I used that stiff bristled gas cylinder brush.

If you do use it, use it maybe twice a year - that's it.


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 Post subject: re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 2007 10:25 am 
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Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 8:58 am
Posts: 157
northeastm1a,

Thanks for the advice and taking the time.

BTW: I use a brass gas cylinder brush.

20 ga.


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 Post subject: re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Thu Oct 11, 2007 6:59 pm 
Tournament Grade

Joined: Wed Sep 04, 2002 8:54 pm
Posts: 181
Location: Holland, MI
Opps :oops: I have been using steel wool to clean my mag tube after weekend playing. Ah, A habit I have just stop. Thanx.


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 Post subject: re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Fri Oct 12, 2007 4:25 am 
Tournament Grade

Joined: Sat Apr 28, 2007 7:09 am
Posts: 200
I wouldn't worry if your gun still cycles for doubles, but yes, I would cease the habit of using the steel wool.


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 Post subject: re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2007 11:02 am 
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Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 8:58 am
Posts: 157
Try 00 bronze wool (Brownells). It works well and no abbraision.


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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Thu Sep 24, 2009 7:09 am 
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Joined: Mon Sep 21, 2009 7:31 am
Posts: 63
Location: DFW
Thank you for the Great Post to keep a real "American" Legend alive. I have pondered the question of how to keep it better maintained than I have done over the years. I have an 1100 Magnum given to me 26 years ago.

By the way, This is my first post and have been lurking to see what to buy due to my interest in Sporting Clay and Five Stand shooting. I have seen a great resistence against in general Remington products due to there " inferior " guns. I can not blame some due to the fact they have had other than USA build the products. I think if more people would read this post and maintain their guns properly, the 1100 maybe more popular. I shot a the Beretta auto this week and have shot Brownings and STILL like the 1100 better. I truly believe that I am shooting as accurate and reliable of a gun for me. My personal experience had been outstanding even with the ammo as well. I am waiting to ensure Remington is not making something new for 2010 for the 1100 competition.



David


Last edited by fayard19 on Mon Dec 07, 2015 2:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Mon Oct 05, 2009 8:29 pm 
Tournament Grade

Joined: Mon Aug 17, 2009 7:06 pm
Posts: 254
northeastm1a wrote:
Mods Please Sticky. The advice below I collected over the years from dealing with old school Remington gunsmiths and is valuable information. Thank you.


Re: 1100 longevity, my first 12 ga 1100 receiver lasted almost 20 yrs of hard, registered shooting (over 50,000 rds since 1981) ; plus easily four times that number in non-registered practice shooting. 250,000 rds is a conservative estimate. It was probably closer to 300,000 rds.

The magazine tube finally broke off the receiver one day when I took apart that 1100 to clean it. It's barrel lasted another three years and probably 25,000 to 30,000 rds after the receiver was junked, before its extension developed a hairline crack near the locking lug recess.

It's bolt lasted another two seasons beyond that before it, too developed a crack near the extractor recess. The original 1981 firing pin after 300,000 estimated rounds is still going strong, though I have probably replaced two dozen firing pin RETRACTOR SPRINGS that broke around the pin during all that time.

The trick to 1100 longevity is as follows:

1. Change the action spring in the stock every 10,000 rds
(some say 5,000, but I've been getting 20-25 yrs of service life
going every 10,000) This is far more important than changing the buffer disc at the back of the bolt and prevents bolt to receiver impact (from the spring tension offering resistance
against the bolt's reward travel) A new action spring is 15" long from the factory before it is installed and compressed. 14-1/2" means - it's time to replace.

2. GREASE the top, exterior surface of the barrel extension
doing this, forms a cheap, "gel" cushion that soaks up the metal to metal impact of the top of the barrel extension against
the inner surface of the receiver top caused by vibrations during firing.


3. Grease the bottom flat surface of the outside of the barrel that presses against the foream support (spring steel bushing)
doing so will DOUBLE the service life of that fragile part.

4. Grease the surfaces of the receiver where the forend support bites into - again reduces some wear and soaks up vibrations

5. After about 100,000 rounds - switch to a locking lug marked with an etched "L" (for large, or long). This takes up the space worn by the friction of the standard lug against the barrel extension over time. Once that recess becomes sufficiently worn, you will get more "peen" impact of the locking lug as its fit becomes loosened and is allowed to whack the barrel extension harder due to the increased space it has to move in.
Once you do this, you're good for about another 100,000 rds
after that, you may need a new barrel. Tell tale signs of worn locking lug recesses include: primers backing out of factory shells. I've worn at least two barrels this way and have replaced a few for other people as well over the years.

6. Inspect the gas cylinder for "ridge burrs" Ridge burrs form from the ring friction from the action bar sleeve driving everything home, hard. Smoothing them out, carefully prevents "train wrecking" of the action bar/action bar sleeve/bolt assembly - all that inertia driven by the action spring slamming the piston and piston seal, home into the "collar" or more properly, GAS CYLINDER - driving the rings into the cylinder - hard - and then having the rings get "tripped up" on ridge burrs that formed inside the gas cylinder. Smoothing out those burrs - will DOUBLE the service life of the piston and piston seal.

7.DO NOT make a habit of using STEEL WOOL or metal abrasives on the magazine tube to clean it. Doing so, WILL over time, reduce the OD (outside diameter) of the mag tube enough to cause, loose ring fit and hence, GAS LOSS leading to irreparable functioning problems. Instead, use rags and solvents, wipe dry and put a drop or two of BREAK FREE on the tube. If you have enough caked on crud to scrape off, use a PLASTIC edged tool, like a disposable plastic picnic knife or other similar NON METAL MARRING plastic tool (expired cut up credit card or something) to scrape carbon residue from the tube.


8. ALWAYS put ONE drop of BREAK FREE or similar lube on the center of the firing pin spring where it is stressed the most.

9. Using a Q-TIP - NOT your fingers - GREASE the underside, flat surfaces of the receiver rails that contact the front part of the link (the "wing" part of the link) Doing this will reduce friction wear and lengthen service life of both the link, and the receiver. Also, new links should be polished, deburred and lubed to prevent burr "snags" during cycling-which leads to broken links and greasing the rails reduces friction wear and the thinning out of the rails which, over time, allows for more MOVEMENT of the link during the firing cycle, which leads to premature link breakage


10. Lube the white spots on the action bar and grease the "fracture point" on the right leg of the action bar.

Replace the link if not broken - after 5,000 shots before entering a serious tournament; replace the firing pin retractor spring at 5,000; the extractor at 10,000, the action spring at 10,000, the piston rings at 5,000 and the forend supports and
rubber vitron barrel seal at 3,000 rds to enhance reliability.

Also, when removing the recoil pad, stock or action spring - DO NOT bear down with your weight against the butt, and the mag tube end against the floor - that will stress the mag tube and lead to prematurely separating the mag tube from the receiver, causing it to be junked.

Following these proven steps along with regular cleaning, and your 1100 is highly unlikely to break down on the line. Mine has not broken down at a trap shoot in over ten years.

The 1100 can outlast a Perazzi or K-80 between parts breakages and will be on the spot repairable in minutes if not, seconds.

Tips acquired over 20 yrs from Remington gunsmiths, service techs and employee-shooters at the Grand and the old Remington Gun Club to include: Amerigo Pagliaroli(fmr mgr: Remington Gun Club & CTA Hall of Fame), "Tex" Cavaina(Sr. Remington 1100 gunsmith); the late Floyd "Jiggs" Cochran (Remington ballistician; CTA Hall of Fame); the late Dick Baldwin, (ATA Hall of Fame) and Daniel Buhan, (fmr trap mechanic of the Remington Gun Club & 1100 shooter) among others.



I am curious,,the spots where you recommend grease..what grease are you using?


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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Thu Oct 22, 2009 7:58 pm 
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Joined: Sun Oct 04, 2009 2:50 pm
Posts: 27
Quote:
I am curious,,the spots where you recommend grease..what grease are you using?


Me too....I am a pistol shooter, new to shotgunning, I use UltimaLube from Wilson Combat on my pistols, a white grease, don't know if it has lithium in it....would this be OK? Am thinking of picking up a lightly used 1100 Sporting, primarily for five stand shooting, some winter league trap...

thanks, Ed

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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Thu Oct 22, 2009 8:34 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 28, 2007 7:09 am
Posts: 200
It really doesn't matter. Any general gun grease. You don't need a lot. rub anywhere there are white spots. Also, use a Q-tip and grease the rails where the link rubs. DO NOT, repeat DO NOT try to lube the rails with your fingers, or anything wrapped around your fingers - you WILL badly cut them open, instantly! Keep fingertips out of the receiver. Let the Q-tip or other tool do the work.

Visit CT's pro gun site at www.ctsas.info


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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Tue Nov 10, 2009 1:32 am 
Limited Edition

Joined: Tue Jan 06, 2009 12:26 am
Posts: 332
I think the "inferior" 1100 Remington talk thru the years could have been avoided if people had only known how to properly clean and service them...they are great guns, but remember when they came out in the early 60's, people were switching over from recoil guns that don't require as much maintenance.
I grew up around a lot of my friends 1100's that were never cleaned properly...just run a patch down the barrel and wipe it down with oil...no wonder they often jammed after they got several seasons behind them....I've learned so much on this forum about the 1100, and I even bought one last week....thanks for all the great info...I've been passing it on to all my old friends so hopefully they'll clean their guns now.


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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Sun Dec 06, 2009 12:39 pm 
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Location: Connecticut
northeastm1a,

Great post and very informative!
Had a great time shooting with you yesterday!!
I may have to get me one of those 1100 that you shoot so well!

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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Wed Dec 09, 2009 4:08 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 12, 2009 6:18 pm
Posts: 62
Never mind :oops:


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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Thu Dec 17, 2009 8:19 pm 
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Joined: Thu Dec 17, 2009 7:52 pm
Posts: 4
Holy Cow !!!
I just joined and one of my first posts was going to be "What is the life expectency of a Remington 11/87 shooting mainly light 1oz target loads ?" I truly thought that these were about 10,000 round guns. 200-300,000 rounds is insane. I bought my 11/87 back in the fall of 88' and have put around 5000 rounds thru it I would guess. About a year and a half ago the forearm cracked near the end of a sporting clays shoot. I figured the gun was about used up and put it back and went out and bought a Browing Citori that I figured would be good for 100,000 rounds. I recently (this week) repaired the crack in the forearm. Sanded the walnut foream and stock down and applied a single coat of Boiled Linseed oil. Can't wait to get this old gun out again this weekend and see if the repairs holds. Looking forward to shooting it again.
To the OP thanks for the excellent post.


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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Thu Dec 17, 2009 8:37 pm 
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LTB45 wrote:
northeastm1a,

Great post and very informative!
Had a great time shooting with you yesterday!!
I may have to get me one of those 1100 that you shoot so well!




So it has been 11 days since I posted that and guess what. I am now the proud owner of an 1100 Trap 150 year anniversary model!
Christmas present from my wife. I took it apart and cleaned her up.

Thanks northeastm1a for the great post and for helping me to find my new obsession for breaking clays!!!

Hopefully the wife will let me shoot it before Christmas!!!

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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Sat Jan 09, 2010 12:21 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 28, 2007 7:09 am
Posts: 200
The Last Boyscout wrote:
Holy Cow !!!
I just joined and one of my first posts was going to be "What is the life expectency of a Remington 11/87 shooting mainly light 1oz target loads ?" I truly thought that these were about 10,000 round guns. 200-300,000 rounds is insane. I bought my 11/87 back in the fall of 88' and have put around 5000 rounds thru it I would guess. About a year and a half ago the forearm cracked near the end of a sporting clays shoot. I figured the gun was about used up and put it back and went out and bought a Browing Citori that I figured would be good for 100,000 rounds. I recently (this week) repaired the crack in the forearm. Sanded the walnut foream and stock down and applied a single coat of Boiled Linseed oil. Can't wait to get this old gun out again this weekend and see if the repairs holds. Looking forward to shooting it again.
To the OP thanks for the excellent post.



Your 1988 model 11-87 with 5,000 rounds through it is "broken in". When I was a teenager, I used to shoot thirty boxes of shells per week in an 1100 - about 10,000 rounds in one summer. I have over 53,000 registered ATA targets and at LEAST TEN TIMES that amount of shooting in non-registered trap. Life expectency of your receiver and barrel is 250-300k rounds with PROPER maintenance. The late Floyd "Jiggs" Cochran of Remington had at least that many rounds through his 1100 (He's in the CT Trapshooters Hall of Fame) and it is estimated that the late Rudy Etchen put close to a million rounds through his 870 which is on exhibit in the ATA Trapshooting Hall of Fame museum. Maintain properly and Keep Shooting!


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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Sat Jan 16, 2010 9:32 am 
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northeastm1a, Great info, just bought my 1st 1100

LTB45, Thanks for the link


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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Mon Jan 25, 2010 5:53 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2004 5:59 pm
Posts: 210
Location: British Columbia CANADA
You mentioned the "fracture point" on the right leg of the action bar. Is that a weak point??



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