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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Mon Jan 21, 2013 7:08 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 10, 2010 12:40 am
Posts: 11
I had broken extractors using a variety of shells and since I use light contour barrels on my 1100 field/trap receivers I purchased a new bolt assy from Remington which has the new style extractor (an 1100 competition bolt with the wider extractor-1187 style) and shot Winchester super target all last year with no problems so far. This bolt will drop right on the action bars of a regular 1100. The light contour barrels have the wider cut out for this style extractor. That way I also have a complete old style bolt assy, which will work fine on the LC barrels or regular barrels to use in case of a broken firing pin/spring/extractor and get my gun running again quickly.




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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2013 2:06 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 15, 2005 8:34 am
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Location: North Texas
This is an excellent thread and made me think of a statement that I recently read on the Remington 1100/11-87's and now I can't find where I read it, but I think it was on this forum.

Quote:
If stored with the bolt open, or with the trigger fired (hammer down), the "Intercepter latch spring" pn 15383 is compressed. The spring will fatigue over time and prematurely fail. This is easily solved by storing the gun with bolt closed hammer cocked.


So, for a longevity tip, what is the best way to store these guns....hammer cocked or hammer released. Is the interceptor latch spring that fragile? And wouldn't the hammer spring be stressed if leaving it cocked? I've already read the thread on How To Store An Automatic Shotgun and this question was raised with various opinions offered. What do the experts say? There is no guidance in the manual.


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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Mon Feb 25, 2013 9:49 am 
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Great Thread.........

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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Sun Jul 07, 2013 11:07 am 
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Joined: Sat Apr 30, 2005 8:55 pm
Posts: 105
I took some pictures of my 1100, which may illustrate some things a little better.

On the magazine, pistons and cylinders, I use BreakFree CLP and I shoot the gun wet, meaning, sprayed on and not wiped off. Let that stuff soak into the metal. It keeps powder residue in suspension and will simply not bake onto metal. Here's the mag tube after shooting probably 125 rounds.

Image

and here are those same parts with a single wipe with a cloth. No scrubbing or steel wool, just a cloth.

Image

Here's the inside of the barrel extension. You can see where the locking lug has been riding hard, removing the bluing and actually dimpling the metal. I put a thin layer of grease on this area. (This is a 20 ga. Magnum gun, btw). You can also see that some bluing is missing from the flat part on the bottom of the barrel. That's where the forearm support rests, and a little dab of grease goes there as well.

Image

This is the top of the barrel extension; a little grease here as well as a cushion against vibration.

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This is the trigger group, and all it's assorted parts. The topmost piece of black metal (looks like the blade of a hockey stick) will show wear at that very top-most tip. Dab o grease.

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You can also see on what is the right side of the lifter, is a large 'ear' that sticks up, near the front of the lifter. That is also another wear point.

Here's the front of the receiver where the foreend support (little wing-shaped little thingie, that sits across the action bars). You can see where the support has bitten into the receiver to make those elongated-"C" marks dimpled into the steel.

Image

This is the action bar assembly, where the bolt rides. Every shiny spot there is from friction. Either very light layer of grease or oil.

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This is the inside of the receiver, specifically where the barrel extension seats against a milled edge. That's another area that needs a little grease as it seems to take a pounding.

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Even this little handle shows signs of friction wear. Lightly grease up both edges and pop it back in.

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Now here's the bolt. Again, it has been sprayed with BF CLP and simply wiped off with a cloth. Almost looks factory new after about 10 seconds of wiping.

Image

And that's it. The rest of the insides I use a very light oil along the action bars where they ride inside the receiver, and CLP on the trigger group parts. The trigger group, when it really gets filthy, I just use hot soapy water and a toothbrush, dry it with compressed air and then a little CLP. The trigger group doesn't get carbon baked into it, just powder residue (and vegetation, dirt from hunting) so it usually cleans up pretty easily.

I hope this helps. If you have an 1100/11-87, take a look at your gun for these signs of wear and see if you can't slow down the damage process somewhat.


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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Sun Jul 21, 2013 8:36 pm 
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texagun wrote:
i asked the same question to my gunsmith who has been working on shotguns since the 1950's. I have a Model 1100 and a Browning Auto-5. He told me to run the Browning Auto-5 "wet" and run the Model 1100 "dry." He said running the 1100 wet would eventually cause problems with functioning because oil collects dust and debris that will clog up the gas ports. I would be interested in other opinions from long-time 1100 shooters.

If you think about it for a second you will realize that your gunsmith is repeating old lore that makes absolutely no sense.

Oil collects dust and debris, correct. It keeps the combustion gas by-products in suspension rather than letting them cake dry on everything. It also lubricates even when dirty, which is why internal combustion engines have oil systems. An 1100 or 11-87 run dry for any amount of time will be a cleaning nightmare of scraping and brushing to rid it of a hard, crusty layer of carbonized crap. The same gun run wet is clean in minutes using an oily rag or better yet those blue paper shop towels.

As to his claim of this "sludge" clogging up the gas ports, I say nonsense. I shoot my 11-87 wet with a light coat of CLP between the mag tube and the piston, piston seal, and action sleeve. As soon as I close the action after cleaning the piston and piston seal will push that oil into the gas cylinder. But the moment you fire the first shot that oil that made it into the gas cylinder will be blown back out by over 5000 psi of gas pressure coming out of those ports.

Soak your action with oil and fire the gun, then remove the barrel to see how much oil is anywhere near the gas ports if you have any doubts.


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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Fri Sep 27, 2013 3:55 pm 
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An oil system in a car is different than putting oil on the gas system of an autoloading shotgun.

In an automobile engine, oil keeps crud in suspension to flow off the part into the oil sump where it is sent to the filter.

There isn't a filter on your 1100, so the crud in the oil forms an abrasive slurry which wears the parts.

I believe in putting oil on the rails and grease on a few parts and pieces like the OP of this thread has suggested, but the mag tube is no place for oil.

Run the gas exposed parts dry and wipe off the powder residue every few hundred rounds and you won't have to chip the deposits off the mag tube. The gun will also live a long and happy life.

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K.I.S.S. - Keep it simple, stupid - The first rule of shotshell reloading.


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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Tue Oct 01, 2013 7:54 am 
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dogchaser, do whatever you like. I reject your explanation about what happens when a gas system is run wet.

Carbon combustion residues are not harder than steel. It is a relatively soft, brittle material that does nothing to abrade hardened alloy steel.

Secondly, I have well over 15 years of first hand experience shooting AR15s in both bullseye and practical competition and they absolutely must be run wet to be reliable. I'm talking 5K - 7K rounds a year, year after year through the same rifle with the only replacement part being a barrel that won't hold the x ring at 600 yards any more.

Not only do they run longer when run wet, there is no appreciable wear after tens of thousands of rounds on any part of the bolt/bolt carrier assembly or the bolt rails on the receiver.

I won't be convinced otherwise.


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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Sun Dec 22, 2013 10:33 am 
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Joined: Mon Jan 15, 2007 9:38 am
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Location: VIRGINIA BEACH
How do you remove the action spring from an 1100? Do you drift out the pin then unscrew the bolt ?


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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Sun Dec 22, 2013 11:14 am 
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Location: Kentucky
WOOD DUCK wrote:
How do you remove the action spring from an 1100? Do you drift out the pin then unscrew the bolt ?


To remove the action spring...

Remove the Buttstock

Using a wooden dowel or screwdriver, compress the action spring plug slightly. This will relieve the pressure on the action spring plug pin, making it easier to remove.

Using a small drift pin or screwdriver remove the action spring plug pin. The action spring plug pin has a small shoulder so you might need to wiggle it while you gently push it out.

Carefully release your pressure on the action spring plug and remove it from the end of the action spring tube. Be careful, the action spring is compressed and can act like a can of snakes from a joke shop. It is more stout than your magazine spring, but careless removal can be quite entertaining for an observer.

Tilt the receiver back and let the action spring follower slide out of the action spring tube.

To reinstall everything I find a wooden dowel a useful tool to aid in compressing the spring while you align everything to get the action spring plug pin back in place.

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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Mon Jan 06, 2014 3:44 pm 
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Location: Palookaville, NJ. Birth place of municipal corruption.
Here's an update on longevity. Sorry the question is not about longevity... Rather how many more rounds before it breaks again is the real question.

Here's what my gun needs right now. Every time I use it down here in Florida, I can expect to change parts. I will buy everything through Brownells so that they can be replaced when they break again through their guarantee.

Hammer spring and sleeve

Hammer pin and washer needs to be removed... but will be ruined when it is removed.

Action bar sleeve...2nd one.

Plan to buy a spare trigger group too.

If it weren't a vacation gun...it would be gone. I don't want to ship an expensive o/u down here every year.

These are great guns to shoot. 1187 SCNP...nice wood. But you need 2-300 dollars in spare parts or a complete spare gun.

I'll use it until it's ready for the trash. Parts in good working order will hit eBay. For example, LT contour sporting clays 30" barrel with external chokes.

Sent from my Nexus 4 using Ohub Campfire mobile app

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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2014 5:44 am 
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Funny, but I have been shooting 1100s and 11-87s since 1963 - 13 in total - and the ONLY part I have ever broken is one extractor in 1982 on my 1963 Model 1100. You must be holding your mouth wrong. I spray and wipe rather than actually wet. Over 115,000 rounds and never a hitch. A lot of "wear points" will show slight wear and then stop after the mating surfaces match up. I have never put any grease on anything.

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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Sun Dec 28, 2014 3:50 pm 
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Thanks for all the great info everyone! Just got my first 1100 a 28" Sporting.


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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Wed Jul 29, 2015 7:58 am 
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Joined: Mon Jun 22, 2015 11:14 am
Posts: 51
Location: Saint Louis, MO
northeastm1a wrote:
Also, use a Q-tip and grease the rails where the link rubs. DO NOT, repeat DO NOT try to lube the rails with your fingers, or anything wrapped around your fingers - you WILL badly cut them open, instantly! Keep fingertips out of the receiver. Let the Q-tip or other tool do the work.


I wish I would have seen this before cleaning my gun this weekend, when I cut my finger on THREE SEPARATE OCCASIONS inside the receiver! Guess my learning curve was a bit steeper than most... :roll:

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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Fri Feb 24, 2017 11:31 am 
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Location: Northern Michigan
Ive seen a lot of people asking about barrel guide stud replacement. About the only thing I can add to this discussion is that this part is not needed. It doesn't hurt anything but it serves only to aid in barrel installation. Once the barrel is aligned and tightened down it serves no purpose. A shooting friend of mine had one go missing 7 or 8 years ago and he has not had a single problem with the gun, shooting it without this part. Remington will tell you the same thing.

Ive heard tell of barrels rotating when firing etc causing issues but i can't see how thats even possible when the gun is buttoned up properly.

https://support.remington.com/General_I ... lace_it%3F



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