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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2012 9:06 am 
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WOOD DUCK wrote:
Do you recomend running it ''wet'' or ''dry'' ?


i asked the same question to my gunsmith who has been working on shotguns since the 1950's. I have a Model 1100 and a Browning Auto-5. He told me to run the Browning Auto-5 "wet" and run the Model 1100 "dry." He said running the 1100 wet would eventually cause problems with functioning because oil collects dust and debris that will clog up the gas ports. I would be interested in other opinions from long-time 1100 shooters.




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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2012 5:27 pm 
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texagun wrote:
WOOD DUCK wrote:
Do you recommend running it ''wet'' or ''dry'' ?


i asked the same question to my gunsmith who has been working on shotguns since the 1950's. I have a Model 1100 and a Browning Auto-5. He told me to run the Browning Auto-5 "wet" and run the Model 1100 "dry." He said running the 1100 wet would eventually cause problems with functioning because oil collects dust and debris that will clog up the gas ports. I would be interested in other opinions from long-time 1100 shooters.


I have been shooting an 1100 for a few years now in ATA trap, as well as hundreds of rounds a week for practice.
Old time 1100 shooters seem to still insist that an 1100 should be run dry. My gun built in 1966 contradicts this idea.

I run my gun DAMP not real wet but DEFFINATLEY NOT DRY. Part of my cleaning process includes cleaning the gas ports, so there is NEVER any clogging in there. I have gone close to 1000 rounds without cleaning and have never had any type of failure caused by a dirty gun.

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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 12:22 am 
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So how do you keep the extractor fom breaking. Mine sheared off today while shooting doubles.


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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 4:28 pm 
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Sorry to hear about your extractor.
At least it is a very inexpensive part and only takes 2 seconds to replace.
Another nice thing about 1100's is that for 99% of the repairs you do not need a Gunsmith.

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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2012 8:42 am 
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I switched to Militec lube on all my guns. It takes some time and effort to apply properly the first couple times, but after that the gun runs "dry" while still being fully lubricated. It's been doing well in my 1100 so far, but I don't have many rounds through it yet. For my Glock, it's performed beautifully for the last 2,000 rounds or so, showing almost no wear on the gun.


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 Post subject: Re: re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2012 2:57 pm 
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northeastm1a wrote:
Another observation re: bolt buffer discs: white is standard and black was used in 1100 Magnum and Trap-T tournaments.
Reportedly made of a more durable plastic.

Remington will ship you the black ones if you specify when calling their parts order line.

They will also ship you the traditional two piece, gas piston and piston seal if you specify. These work better on older 1100 mag tubes

Also when ordering extractors for any of the 3+ million 1100s made during the DuPont years (pre 11-87 era); order the 870 extractor. If you fail to specify, they will ship you the thicker
11-87 extractor (the new "default" part used on current 1100s)which will not fit in the old style 1100 bolt, nor the old style 1100 barrel extractor cut-out.



So where is the info to determine if mine is pre 11-87


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 Post subject: Re: re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2012 3:03 pm 
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LadyT wrote:
northeastm1a wrote:
Another observation re: bolt buffer discs: white is standard and black was used in 1100 Magnum and Trap-T tournaments.
Reportedly made of a more durable plastic.

Remington will ship you the black ones if you specify when calling their parts order line.

They will also ship you the traditional two piece, gas piston and piston seal if you specify. These work better on older 1100 mag tubes

Also when ordering extractors for any of the 3+ million 1100s made during the DuPont years (pre 11-87 era); order the 870 extractor. If you fail to specify, they will ship you the thicker
11-87 extractor (the new "default" part used on current 1100s)which will not fit in the old style 1100 bolt, nor the old style 1100 barrel extractor cut-out.



So where is the info to determine if mine is pre 11-87


LadyT,

What is any is the prefix in your serial number and what is the two letter date code that is stamped on the left side of the barrel closest to the receiver?

JM

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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2012 3:12 pm 
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I have actually busted a white buffer before.
If you ever break one then, just order the black....much better.
Another 2 minute repair job but, you do need a drill to put a hole in the buffer for the retaining pin.

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 Post subject: Re: re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Tue May 08, 2012 8:55 am 
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Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2012 9:37 am
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TuJays wrote:
LadyT wrote:
northeastm1a wrote:
Another observation re: bolt buffer discs: white is standard and black was used in 1100 Magnum and Trap-T tournaments.
Reportedly made of a more durable plastic.

Remington will ship you the black ones if you specify when calling their parts order line.

They will also ship you the traditional two piece, gas piston and piston seal if you specify. These work better on older 1100 mag tubes

Also when ordering extractors for any of the 3+ million 1100s made during the DuPont years (pre 11-87 era); order the 870 extractor. If you fail to specify, they will ship you the thicker
11-87 extractor (the new "default" part used on current 1100s)which will not fit in the old style 1100 bolt, nor the old style 1100 barrel extractor cut-out.



So where is the info to determine if mine is pre 11-87


LadyT,

What is any is the prefix in your serial number and what is the two letter date code that is stamped on the left side of the barrel closest to the receiver?

JM



Prefix is the letter N
Serial number is N6xxxxxV
Date code appears to be only 1 letter and that's a "Z" though to the left of the "Z" is a group of 4 letters "A M O H". Only one letter next to the receiver


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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Tue May 08, 2012 9:15 am 
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Copied from another forum:

Remington Year of Manufacture Codes maybe found on the barrel of your Remington rifle [or shotgun] on the left side, just forward of the receiver; the first letter of the Code is the month of manufacture, followed by one or two letters which are the year of manufacture. For shotguns with removeable barrels, the code will be valid for the manufacture of the barrel; maybe for the receiver, as barrels do get switched around.

According to the "Blue Book of Gun Values", the coding continues as follows:

Month Codes: [first letter]
B - L - A - C - K - P - O - W - D - E - R - X
1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8 - 9 - 10 - 11 - 12

Year:______Code: [second (and third*) letters]
1930_______ Y
1931_______ Z
1932_______ A
1933_______ B
1934_______ C
1935_______ D
1936_______ E
1937_______ F
1938_______ G
1939_______ H

1940_______ J
1941_______ K
1942_______ L
1943_______ MMZ
1944_______ NN
1945_______ PP
1946_______ RR
1947_______ SS
1948_______ TT
1949_______ UU

1950_______ WW
1951_______ XX
1952_______ YY
1953_______ ZZ
1954_______ A
1955_______ B
1956_______ C
1957_______ D
1958_______ E
1959_______ F

1960_______ G
1961_______ H
1962_______ J
1963_______ K
1964_______ L
1965_______ M
1966_______ N
1967_______ P
1968_______ R
1969_______ S

1970_______ T
1971_______ U
1972_______ W
1973_______ X
1974_______ Y
1975_______ Z
1976_______ I
1977_______ O
1978_______ Q
1979_______ V

1980_______ A
1981_______ B
1982_______ C
1983_______ D
1984_______ E
1985_______ F
1986_______ G
1987_______ H
1988_______ I
1989_______ J

1990_______ K
1991_______ L
1992_______ M
1993_______ N
1994_______ O
1995_______ P
1996_______ Q
1997_______ R
1998_______ S
1999_______ T
2000_______ U
2001_______ W
2002_______ X

* the years 1943 though 1953 had double letters: ie, MM = 1943

As maybe seen, the year code letters duplicate; some knowledge of when the model was introduced should resolve the actual year of manufacture.

Remington owners: COPY this table to your Hard Drive......! !

another couple helpfull links: http://www.remington.com/library/his...irearm_models/

http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nviss/do...Codelist21.pdf

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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Tue May 08, 2012 9:29 am 
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So mine was made in 1975?


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 Post subject: Re: re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Tue May 08, 2012 1:52 pm 
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LadyT wrote:

Prefix is the letter N
Serial number is N6xxxxxV
Date code appears to be only 1 letter and that's a "Z" though to the left of the "Z" is a group of 4 letters "A M O H". Only one letter next to the receiver


Your "Z" is probably a number 2 or 7 and not a "Z"
year is "H" and "O" is the month the barrel was made...which is July 1987
"N" prefix began in 1978 and ran until it was replaced by "P" in 1985. So if you have the original barrel on your gun then I would guess that your receiver was made in late 1985/early 1986
The "V" indicates that it is a 12 gauge with a 2 3/4" chamber.

On the left side of the barrel, starting with the marking that is closest to the receiver and working out towards the end of the barrel in order right to left....I will use my 16 gauge as a example......IMP. CYL. PB3? ?PV37 [receiver]

37-Assembly (a number or numbers not a letter)
V-year produced (letter)
P-month produce (letter)
?-final inspector stamp (may look like a letter but it is not, but is unique to that inspector)
then there is usually a small blank area
?-customer repair inspector (may look like a letter but it is not, but is unique to that inspector)
3-customer repair stamp (a number or numbers not a letter)
B-year repaired (letter)
P-month repaired (letter)
then there is usually a small gap
IMP. CYL.

Call Remington and give them your serial # and they will tell you when it was assembled and you can prove me wrong or maybe right {hs#

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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Tue May 29, 2012 3:09 am 
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Just been reading a list of tips for reducing the likelihood of parts failure on Remington 1100/11-87, and found it very useful. However, I'm surprised that nobody mentions breakage of the carrier - I've had two snap off on the left arm, where the stamping thins and bends. On showing the offending item to a metallurgist friend, he pointed out that the corners of the arm were sharp and that they therefore act as a weak point where stress is concentrated. His suggestion was to slightly round off the 'corners' of both arms, then mirror polish them. Was easy to do, and so far, no more problems.

PS I live in the UK and have to say that the Remington 1100 11-87 is easily the best handling 'auto' that I've laid my hands on - well done USA. Its also a fine looking piece as well.


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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 8:37 pm 
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The numbers on the left side of the barrel on my 11-87 appear to be L1 25 or Ll 25 with the 25 being slightly larger than the the L? stamping. There is also a symbol that looks sorta like a paper clip in front of the sequence.

Do these numbers convert to Feb 1988 as the month of production?


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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Sun Aug 19, 2012 1:14 pm 
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LadyT wrote:
So how do you keep the extractor fom breaking. Mine sheared off today while shooting doubles.


1. Check for burrs in the extractor notch in the barrel.

2. Check for burrs on the extractor itself.

3. If you shoot a LOT, get an 870 POLICE MAGNUM extractor. It's not made of powdered metal. (this is for 1100s made before the 11-87). Old 1100s use 870 extractors. Current 1100s use 11-87 extractors, the solution there is to get an 11-87 Police Extractor.


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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Sun Aug 19, 2012 1:21 pm 
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northeastm1a wrote:
LadyT wrote:
So how do you keep the extractor fom breaking. Mine sheared off today while shooting doubles.


1. Check for burrs in the extractor notch in the barrel.

2. Check for burrs on the extractor itself.

3. If you shoot a LOT, get an 870 POLICE MAGNUM extractor. It's not made of powdered metal. (this is for 1100s made before the 11-87). Old 1100s use 870 extractors. Current 1100s use 11-87 extractors, the solution there is to get an 11-87 Police Extractor.


Also, do not shoot Winchester Super Target or Universals. Their heads are soft, expand and make difficult extraction which puts undue stress on the extractor. I also have this problem with Rios in my particular gun, whose barrel is from the '60s. Brass head competition loads are fine and so are the Federal Wal Mart value packs. Remington Gun Clubs used to be ok, but they suck now, too.


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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2012 11:18 pm 
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Some info on 1100 longevity from Wikipedia:
Quote:
The model 1100 holds the record for the most shells fired out of an autoloading shotgun without malfunction, cleaning or parts breakage with a record of over 24,000 rounds. The record was set in 1978 with a Remington model 1100 LT-20. Breaking this record has been attempted with several other models of Semi auto shotguns but has yet to be broken. In 2011 Remington introduced the model 1100 Competition Synthetic, showing the 1100 still has a lot of life left in it.

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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2012 9:14 pm 
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Great tips - many thanks!

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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2012 11:06 pm 
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Great thread. Glad I found this.


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 Post subject: Re: 1100 Longevity Tips -
PostPosted: Fri Jan 11, 2013 9:31 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 28, 2011 1:25 pm
Posts: 39
Quote:
Also, do not shoot Winchester Super Target or Universals. Their heads are soft, expand and make difficult extraction which puts undue stress on the extractor. I also have this problem with Rios in my particular gun, whose barrel is from the '60s. Brass head competition loads are fine and so are the Federal Wal Mart value packs. Remington Gun Clubs used to be ok, but they suck now, too.


Would this also apply to a new Competition Sythetic 1100. I shoot lots of Super Targets.

Thanks,

Randy




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