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 Post subject: I have a question about rabbit fever
PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2016 11:44 pm 
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I asked this several days but most probally didn't see it.
What is Rabbit Fever? I'm 65 and have never hheard of it.
when I was growing up we never rabbit hunted until after 1st killing frost. I always thought it was because of wolves. I've seen posts where people posted of rabbit feaver. I don't know what it is and how it affects rabbits would someone explane what it is and how it effects eating rabbits before frost? thanks



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 Post subject: Re: I have a question about rabbit fever
PostPosted: Sat Oct 15, 2016 10:10 pm 
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I didn't exactly know what it was either but you made me curious so I looked it up. Apparently the disease doesn't leave the animal when it gets cold. I've heard you can tell if a rabbit is infected by looking at the liver but I don't know how true that is.

"The main mode of transmission to humans is tick bites in the summer and exposure to rabbits in the fall and winter during the small-game hunting season."

http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/ ... ekey=19170
"Rabbit fever: An infection in rabbits and other wild rodents caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis that can be transmitted to humans by contact with infected animal tissues or ticks. Also called tularemia.

The main mode of transmission to humans is tick bites in the summer and exposure to rabbits in the fall and winter during the small-game hunting season. The domestic rabbit is the main source of serious infection. Transmission may be by direct contact, contact with aerosolized bacteria, eating infected tissue or by the bite of a colonized tick, deerfly, or flea that has fed on a sick rabbit.

Symptoms include a red spot on the skin enlarging to an ulcer, enlarged lymph nodes (swollen glands) in the groin or armpits, headache, muscle pain, shortness of breath, fever, chills, sweating, weight loss, and joint stiffness. Some people develop an atypical pneumonia. The illness may continue for several weeks after the onset of symptoms.

The antibiotics streptomycin and tetracycline are commonly used to treat tularemia. (Oral tetracycline is usually not prescribed for children until after all the permanent teeth have erupted. It can permanently discolor teeth that are still forming.)

A vaccine is available for people at high risk (trappers, hunters, and laboratory workers) to prevent the disease.

Tularemia is fatal in about 5% of untreated cases, and in less than 1% of treated cases. Possible complications include meningitis, pneumonia, pericarditis and osteomyelitis.

Tularemia has declined in frequency in the US, probably because wild rabbits are no longer available in markets and also because of increased awareness among hunters of the risks posed by sick rabbits."

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 Post subject: Re: I have a question about rabbit fever
PostPosted: Sat Oct 15, 2016 11:24 pm 
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Thanks FishingpoleJoe, I would never have thought to have looked it up.

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 Post subject: Re: I have a question about rabbit fever
PostPosted: Sun Oct 16, 2016 4:37 am 
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rsr1950 wrote:
Thanks FishingpoleJoe, I would never have thought to have looked it up.


{hs#

Maybe some of the other guys can tell us how to recognize a sick rabbit.

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 Post subject: Re: I have a question about rabbit fever
PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2016 3:11 pm 
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fishinpolejoe wrote:
rsr1950 wrote:
Thanks FishingpoleJoe, I would never have thought to have looked it up.


{hs#

Maybe some of the other guys can tell us how to recognize a sick rabbit.


From what I have read, if the rabbit has an advanced case you will see the liver shot through with white streaks. I personally have never seen it. The other thing you will supposedly see is odd or sluggish behavior. Not a great indicator, IMO. I think the wise thing is to assume every rabbit you take is infected and take appropriate precautions. I don't touch a rabbit with bare hands, wear nitrile gloves when cleaning them, wash everything carefully that they or their meat touches, and cook them thoroughly.


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 Post subject: Re: I have a question about rabbit fever
PostPosted: Fri Apr 21, 2017 7:27 pm 
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When my mother was a child in the 1930's and there was an epidemic of rabbit fever around her home town in rural South Alabama. People quit hunting rabbits for a long while.

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 Post subject: Re: I have a question about rabbit fever
PostPosted: Fri Apr 21, 2017 8:17 pm 
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I won't bother with a rabbit here in FL until it gets cold..............and from this thread, maybe that isn't even enough

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 Post subject: Re: I have a question about rabbit fever
PostPosted: Fri Apr 21, 2017 10:29 pm 
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I think the business about not eating rabbits until after the first freeze was because of nasty, under-the -skin worms. Absolutely the grossest thing you'll ever see and it was during warm weather when I encountered one. Never saw an infected rabbit when it was cold.

Supposedly, the infected rabbits couldn't survive cold weather.

Cured me of eating rabbits. I was still more than happy to hunt them for other people until one of the kids got a pet rabbit. That cured me of hunting them.

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 Post subject: Re: I have a question about rabbit fever
PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 9:34 pm 
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Because of characters like the Easter Bunny, Peter Rabbit and Bugs Bunny there is practically no commercial rabbit meat sold in grocery stores in the US. 100 years ago rabbit was a staple meat just like chicken, beef and pork.

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 Post subject: Re: I have a question about rabbit fever
PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2017 10:18 am 
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Domestic rabbit is quite good, maybe better than wild rabbit. The Rouses Supermarket chain down here carries it frozen, but not fresh.


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 Post subject: Re: I have a question about rabbit fever
PostPosted: Thu May 18, 2017 4:00 pm 
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Saw whole frozen domestic rabbits at the local Rouse's grocery for $24.99 each. :shock: I like them, but not nearly that much.


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 Post subject: Re: I have a question about rabbit fever
PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2018 9:45 am 
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Though I'm not much experience hunter. But I honestly I never heard about rabbit fever. Got a new experience here. :)


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 Post subject: Re: I have a question about rabbit fever
PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2018 11:49 am 
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fishinpolejoe wrote:
I didn't exactly know what it was either but you made me curious so I looked it up. Apparently the disease doesn't leave the animal when it gets cold. I've heard you can tell if a rabbit is infected by looking at the liver but I don't know how true that is.

"The main mode of transmission to humans is tick bites in the summer and exposure to rabbits in the fall and winter during the small-game hunting season."

http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/ ... ekey=19170
"Rabbit fever: An infection in rabbits and other wild rodents caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis that can be transmitted to humans by contact with infected animal tissues or ticks. Also called tularemia.

The main mode of transmission to humans is tick bites in the summer and exposure to rabbits in the fall and winter during the small-game hunting season. The domestic rabbit is the main source of serious infection. Transmission may be by direct contact, contact with aerosolized bacteria, eating infected tissue or by the bite of a colonized tick, deerfly, or flea that has fed on a sick rabbit.

Symptoms include a red spot on the skin enlarging to an ulcer, enlarged lymph nodes (swollen glands) in the groin or armpits, headache, muscle pain, shortness of breath, fever, chills, sweating, weight loss, and joint stiffness. Some people develop an atypical pneumonia. The illness may continue for several weeks after the onset of symptoms.

The antibiotics streptomycin and tetracycline are commonly used to treat tularemia. (Oral tetracycline is usually not prescribed for children until after all the permanent teeth have erupted. It can permanently discolor teeth that are still forming.)

A vaccine is available for people at high risk (trappers, hunters, and laboratory workers) to prevent the disease.

Tularemia is fatal in about 5% of untreated cases, and in less than 1% of treated cases. Possible complications include meningitis, pneumonia, pericarditis and osteomyelitis.

Tularemia has declined in frequency in the US, probably because wild rabbits are no longer available in markets and also because of increased awareness among hunters of the risks posed by sick rabbits."


Pasturella tularensis is the causative organism ( bacteria ). The bubonic plague bacterium, Yersinia pestis, used to be called Pasturella pestis, so they are related but different. The two diseases in humans share some of the same symptomatology, but they respond to antibiotics. Used to hear a lot about rabbit fever but not so much anymore.


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 Post subject: Re: I have a question about rabbit fever
PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2018 11:51 am 
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Tidefanatic wrote:
fishinpolejoe wrote:
I didn't exactly know what it was either but you made me curious so I looked it up. Apparently the disease doesn't leave the animal when it gets cold. I've heard you can tell if a rabbit is infected by looking at the liver but I don't know how true that is.

"The main mode of transmission to humans is tick bites in the summer and exposure to rabbits in the fall and winter during the small-game hunting season."

http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/ ... ekey=19170
"Rabbit fever: An infection in rabbits and other wild rodents caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis that can be transmitted to humans by contact with infected animal tissues or ticks. Also called tularemia.

The main mode of transmission to humans is tick bites in the summer and exposure to rabbits in the fall and winter during the small-game hunting season. The domestic rabbit is the main source of serious infection. Transmission may be by direct contact, contact with aerosolized bacteria, eating infected tissue or by the bite of a colonized tick, deerfly, or flea that has fed on a sick rabbit.

Symptoms include a red spot on the skin enlarging to an ulcer, enlarged lymph nodes (swollen glands) in the groin or armpits, headache, muscle pain, shortness of breath, fever, chills, sweating, weight loss, and joint stiffness. Some people develop an atypical pneumonia. The illness may continue for several weeks after the onset of symptoms.

The antibiotics streptomycin and tetracycline are commonly used to treat tularemia. (Oral tetracycline is usually not prescribed for children until after all the permanent teeth have erupted. It can permanently discolor teeth that are still forming.)

A vaccine is available for people at high risk (trappers, hunters, and laboratory workers) to prevent the disease.

Tularemia is fatal in about 5% of untreated cases, and in less than 1% of treated cases. Possible complications include meningitis, pneumonia, pericarditis and osteomyelitis.

Tularemia has declined in frequency in the US, probably because wild rabbits are no longer available in markets and also because of increased awareness among hunters of the risks posed by sick rabbits."


Pasturella tularensis is the causative organism ( bacteria ). The bubonic plague bacterium, Yersinia pestis, used to be called Pasturella pestis, so they are related but different. The two diseases in humans share some of the same symptomatology, but they respond to antibiotics. Used to hear a lot about rabbit fever but not so much anymore.


OOps ! F. tularensis. I`ve been out of microbiology too long!! The taxonomists make their living by renaming bacteria!


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 Post subject: Re: I have a question about rabbit fever
PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2018 12:49 pm 
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Tidefanatic wrote:
Tidefanatic wrote:
fishinpolejoe wrote:
I didn't exactly know what it was either but you made me curious so I looked it up. Apparently the disease doesn't leave the animal when it gets cold. I've heard you can tell if a rabbit is infected by looking at the liver but I don't know how true that is.

"The main mode of transmission to humans is tick bites in the summer and exposure to rabbits in the fall and winter during the small-game hunting season."

http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/ ... ekey=19170
"Rabbit fever: An infection in rabbits and other wild rodents caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis that can be transmitted to humans by contact with infected animal tissues or ticks. Also called tularemia.

The main mode of transmission to humans is tick bites in the summer and exposure to rabbits in the fall and winter during the small-game hunting season. The domestic rabbit is the main source of serious infection. Transmission may be by direct contact, contact with aerosolized bacteria, eating infected tissue or by the bite of a colonized tick, deerfly, or flea that has fed on a sick rabbit.

Symptoms include a red spot on the skin enlarging to an ulcer, enlarged lymph nodes (swollen glands) in the groin or armpits, headache, muscle pain, shortness of breath, fever, chills, sweating, weight loss, and joint stiffness. Some people develop an atypical pneumonia. The illness may continue for several weeks after the onset of symptoms.

The antibiotics streptomycin and tetracycline are commonly used to treat tularemia. (Oral tetracycline is usually not prescribed for children until after all the permanent teeth have erupted. It can permanently discolor teeth that are still forming.)

A vaccine is available for people at high risk (trappers, hunters, and laboratory workers) to prevent the disease.

Tularemia is fatal in about 5% of untreated cases, and in less than 1% of treated cases. Possible complications include meningitis, pneumonia, pericarditis and osteomyelitis.

Tularemia has declined in frequency in the US, probably because wild rabbits are no longer available in markets and also because of increased awareness among hunters of the risks posed by sick rabbits."


Pasturella tularensis is the causative organism ( bacteria ). The bubonic plague bacterium, Yersinia pestis, used to be called Pasturella pestis, so they are related but different. The two diseases in humans share some of the same symptomatology, but they respond to antibiotics. Used to hear a lot about rabbit fever but not so much anymore.


OOps ! F. tularensis. I`ve been out of microbiology too long!! The taxonomists make their living by renaming bacteria!


Thanks for sharing that, Tide!




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