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 Post subject: Re: Pistol shooting and effects on clay shooting
PostPosted: Fri May 11, 2018 11:55 pm 
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Joined: Sat Mar 25, 2017 4:04 pm
Posts: 38
Zbigniew wrote:
If you focus hard on that front sight in a gun fight...how are you going to know when to quit or keep shooting? Or when to switch to a different target?


I have not been in combat and have not been attacked by someone using lethal force. I have friends who have been in combat, etc. including a couple retired SEALs. From what they tell me, if the proverbial Bad Guy breaks into your house at night and surprises you and threatens your life, your problem will not be seeing or focusing on him. In fact, they tell me, you will probably experience tunnel vision and have a hard time seeing or thinking about anything other than him.

Thus the point of the Jeff Cooper “flash sight picture” and concentration on the front sight is to break that fixation on the threat and rapidly get the front sight on him, lest you just miss entirely. It’s not hard to find stories of police officers who dump a whole magazine at a perp and barely put a single round on target. I believe that happened just a couple years back in NY City.

As to when to stop shooting, I personally would not. If someone truly attacked me with deadly force I’d put the whole mag into them, at least until they’re flat out on the ground. Dead criminals can’t lie and make you out to be the aggressor.

https://www.americanrifleman.org/articl ... -shooting/




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 Post subject: Re: Pistol shooting and effects on clay shooting
PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2018 9:01 am 
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Joined: Tue Jun 26, 2007 12:36 pm
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Location: California Gold Country
That article is always a great refresher read. Thanks!


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 Post subject: Re: Pistol shooting and effects on clay shooting
PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2018 2:16 pm 
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Joined: Sat Mar 12, 2016 10:39 pm
Posts: 2546
HenryVac wrote:
Zbigniew wrote:
If you focus hard on that front sight in a gun fight...how are you going to know when to quit or keep shooting? Or when to switch to a different target?


I have not been in combat and have not been attacked by someone using lethal force. I have friends who have been in combat, etc. including a couple retired SEALs. From what they tell me, if the proverbial Bad Guy breaks into your house at night and surprises you and threatens your life, your problem will not be seeing or focusing on him. In fact, they tell me, you will probably experience tunnel vision and have a hard time seeing or thinking about anything other than him.

Thus the point of the Jeff Cooper “flash sight picture” and concentration on the front sight is to break that fixation on the threat and rapidly get the front sight on him, lest you just miss entirely. It’s not hard to find stories of police officers who dump a whole magazine at a perp and barely put a single round on target. I believe that happened just a couple years back in NY City.

As to when to stop shooting, I personally would not. If someone truly attacked me with deadly force I’d put the whole mag into them, at least until they’re flat out on the ground. Dead criminals can’t lie and make you out to be the aggressor.

https://www.americanrifleman.org/articl ... -shooting/


If you are awakened to the sight of a criminal in your house, you are not going to think, "Now what did Col. Cooper say about tunnel vision?"

You absolutely HAVE to know when to quit shooting. Are you going to dump a whole magazine into Bad Guy #1 while his partner is standing ten feet away about to shoot you? They don't always work alone.

I would have loved to take Col. Cooper or any of the handgun 'authorities' on a rabbit hunt using dogs and see if they could hit a running rabbit. I've known some really good pistol shots, much better than me on a stationary target. But they really struggled on moving targets such as rabbits.

There are three objects involved in shooting--target, front sight, rear sight. Your eyes can only focus on one; the others will be in your peripheral vision but slightly blurred. Here's the question: If you can afford having the target in peripheral vision while focusing on the front sight, why can't you afford to have the front sight in peripheral vision and the target in focus? A front sight by itself is nothing more than the bead on a shotgun. Who stares at that bead while shooting a shotgun?

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 Post subject: Re: Pistol shooting and effects on clay shooting
PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2018 7:26 pm 
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Joined: Sat Feb 13, 2016 6:28 pm
Posts: 299
In a defensive situation the distance is likely to be very close. Practice instinctive shooting at 7 yards or closer. Put up a couple target frames using life-size human silhouette targets. Practice drawing and extending your arm to the center of the target and smoothly pulling the trigger. An old friend and firearm instructor for our state police showed me to trust my instincts and not over think it (just like our approach to shooting a shotgun). He pointed out that when you are talking to someone and point your finger at them that you are pointing it at their center mass. It's instinctive. Point your pistol at a silhouette target and you will notice the same thing. The trick is to have a good and consistent grip and trigger pull. A lot of useful practice can be done with an empty gun. I have a pistol with a laser sight. I will practice quickly pointing (not aiming) my pistol at objects around the house and then flick the laser on and more times than not, the laser will be on the object that I'm pointing to. The laser will also be good practice for your trigger control during dry firing practice as you will be able to see if you are pulling the gun off target with a bad pull. It's not unusual for me to shoot a round of skeet, shoot some pistol and then shoot some more skeet in a typical morning. I have no problem going from one to the other, but then I'm not shooting bulleye targets either. I practice strictly for getting center mass hits in close range defensive shooting and I'm not looking at my pistol at all, just the target.


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