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 Post subject: Remington V3 review shot beside a Benelli Super Vinci
PostPosted: Mon May 21, 2018 5:01 pm 
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I have some very boring footage of this gun being shot, and I’ve also got a video showing the gas blowback that I’ll be editing and uploading hopefully sooner than later. Feel free to post any comments, questions, concerns, or critiques.
Below is my review of my new Remington V3 and a brief comparison to a Benelli Super Vinci:

My brother and I took our shotguns out to the skeet range this weekend. I put 4 boxes of 2 ¾” field shot through it and my brother shot about a box through it. It was equipped with the Pattern Master Code Black Duck choke tube. My brother’s gun was brought along for comparison, it had the Patter Master Goose choke tube.
I have shot this gun 1 time previously; a handful of rounds into a raving back in the woods. I had already read about the possibility of getting a face full of hot gas and burnt powder residue. I definitely felt it through those first shots. I captured it on video (although not good, it was late and lighting was bad) which I’ll post links to later. Going into this shoot I did not let my brother know about this so he’d have no preconceived notions of what to expect. I only made sure we both had glasses on. After his first shot he immediately said “Smells like gunpowder!” He noticed it for sure, but it wasn’t bad enough to deter him from continuing to shoot which was my takeaway….not really that bad, but it’d be nice if it weren’t there.
Ergonomics: Altogether the gun feels great in my hand. From the left side the gun looks very similar to an 870. The forend is neither slim nor bulky, and I had no issues with getting a comfortable grip. I wear an XL glove size. The trigger felt great with no issues of which to speak. The safety is in a great spot. The only gripe on the guns ergonomics is that it needs SHIMS!!!! Shooting the Vinci side by side I was able to tell a significant difference with the ease of which I was able to get a great line of sight. The Vinci just lined up better. My brother, father, and I noticed how much we were having to force our cheek weld in order to get a good bead picture. I actually took my stock off and removed the “neutral” shim that’s included with the gun. Doing this enabled me to loosen the stock some to simulate more drop at the comb. It really would not take much to give this gun a perfect line of sight. This really was a big difference maker when shooting the V3 vs the Vinci.
Recoil felt much better with the V3 compared to the Vinci. These are obviously much different firearms. The V3 is gas and the Super Vinci is recoil operated. The Vinci weighs in at 7 lbs whereas the V3 is 7 ¼. Very close to the same. The Vinci had a “cla-clunk”ness to the recoil that the V3 simply did not have. The V3 was just one soft “thunk” of recoil, but the Vinci’s recoil was almost felt twice. Once when the spring bottomed out and once when slamming a shell back into battery. While the Vinci could not be classified as harsh (especially with 2 ¾ ) you could feel it shifting your body enough to make the follow-up shot a little more difficult. Big win for the V3 here in my opinion. Remington nailed it here!
Fit and Finish: The gun is built well. The finish is good. Everything lines up. The barrel doesn’t wiggle. The forend doesn’t wiggle around. It is a solid, well-built gun. I plan on getting the barrel cerakoted, so I won’t be able to comment on how it will hold up. I intend to use it for duck hunting in brackish marsh. My brother who adamantly opposed me getting the V3 and does not like anything Remington was really impressed with the fit and finish off the gun. And while my father didn’t shoot the V3, he did hold it and shoulder it. He currently has an A5 which he hates. He was impressed with the weight of the V3 and how it felt. When I told him I only paid $499 for it new his jaw dropped. His only reservation was the cheek weld did not provide a good line of sight down the barrel. SHIMS SHIMS SHIMS!
Reliability: The gun performed flawlessly. I’ve not seen any reports of the V3 having reliability problems. I have nothing to report here except the gun has gone bang every time I’ve asked it to. No cycling problems to speak of. My brother was impressed with the reliability and ability to shoot the low brass 2 ¾ with no issues. My father was a bit jealous because he has issues during dove season with his A5 shooting low brass.
Disassembly: I can only comment on what I’ve taken apart so far. The gun field strips easily and goes back together easily. When putting the bolt back in, be sure not to press on the bolt face, but the bolt carrier only. Push it in even with the end of the receiver to make sure it lines up correctly for the bolt handle. The recoil springs are in the receiver and do not extend into the stock. This is great because you can use the available shims to get a great line of sight!!(okay that was crossed through in my word doc, but the format did not translate over and I can't figure out how to do that on my phone.) A great design by Remington that makes keeping all operating/moving parts cleaned and lubed a breeze. The bolt is easy to disassemble. I was able to take it apart and put back together with no tools. Makes cleaning very easy. A side note, I just started using frog lube and man that stuff is awesome!
On a scale of 1-10 I’d say this gun gets an 8.5. Yes I’m knocking it for not having shims and yes I’m knocking it for the gas blowing back in my face. Yes I wore glasses this time around. Yes, I still noticed it and it is still annoying on my Black Synthetic 28” model. For $499 at some online retailers you get a fantastic value with the V3. You get all the standard choke tubes that I’ll never use. I honestly think my dad would sell his A5 to get this gun. He and I both started our duck hunting hobbies shooting 870s and are both Remington fans. You get a written lifetime warranty (not implied like Ruger). Assuming Remington will continue being around this is a big deal. Before making this decision I wondered, “How much shotgun am I missing out on by not spending an extra $1,000-1500? Well, now that I’ve spent the money and compared it…..not much. There isn’t a lot of shotgun out there you don’t get if you spend $499 on the Remington V3.
8.5/10 Would buy again.




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 Post subject: Re: Remington V3 review shot beside a Benelli Super Vinci
PostPosted: Mon May 21, 2018 6:29 pm 
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fblainen11 wrote:
I have some very boring footage of this gun being shot, and I’ve also got a video showing the gas blowback that I’ll be editing and uploading hopefully sooner than later. Feel free to post any comments, questions, concerns, or critiques.
Below is my review of my new Remington V3 and a brief comparison to a Benelli Super Vinci:

My brother and I took our shotguns out to the skeet range this weekend. I put 4 boxes of 2 ¾” field shot through it and my brother shot about a box through it. It was equipped with the Pattern Master Code Black Duck choke tube. My brother’s gun was brought along for comparison, it had the Patter Master Goose choke tube.
I have shot this gun 1 time previously; a handful of rounds into a raving back in the woods. I had already read about the possibility of getting a face full of hot gas and burnt powder residue. I definitely felt it through those first shots. I captured it on video (although not good, it was late and lighting was bad) which I’ll post links to later. Going into this shoot I did not let my brother know about this so he’d have no preconceived notions of what to expect. I only made sure we both had glasses on. After his first shot he immediately said “Smells like gunpowder!” He noticed it for sure, but it wasn’t bad enough to deter him from continuing to shoot which was my takeaway….not really that bad, but it’d be nice if it weren’t there.
Ergonomics: Altogether the gun feels great in my hand. From the left side the gun looks very similar to an 870. The forend is neither slim nor bulky, and I had no issues with getting a comfortable grip. I wear an XL glove size. The trigger felt great with no issues of which to speak. The safety is in a great spot. The only gripe on the guns ergonomics is that it needs SHIMS!!!! Shooting the Vinci side by side I was able to tell a significant difference with the ease of which I was able to get a great line of sight. The Vinci just lined up better. My brother, father, and I noticed how much we were having to force our cheek weld in order to get a good bead picture. I actually took my stock off and removed the “neutral” shim that’s included with the gun. Doing this enabled me to loosen the stock some to simulate more drop at the comb. It really would not take much to give this gun a perfect line of sight. This really was a big difference maker when shooting the V3 vs the Vinci.
Recoil felt much better with the V3 compared to the Vinci. These are obviously much different firearms. The V3 is gas and the Super Vinci is recoil operated. The Vinci weighs in at 7 lbs whereas the V3 is 7 ¼. Very close to the same. The Vinci had a “cla-clunk”ness to the recoil that the V3 simply did not have. The V3 was just one soft “thunk” of recoil, but the Vinci’s recoil was almost felt twice. Once when the spring bottomed out and once when slamming a shell back into battery. While the Vinci could not be classified as harsh (especially with 2 ¾ ) you could feel it shifting your body enough to make the follow-up shot a little more difficult. Big win for the V3 here in my opinion. Remington nailed it here!
Fit and Finish: The gun is built well. The finish is good. Everything lines up. The barrel doesn’t wiggle. The forend doesn’t wiggle around. It is a solid, well-built gun. I plan on getting the barrel cerakoted, so I won’t be able to comment on how it will hold up. I intend to use it for duck hunting in brackish marsh. My brother who adamantly opposed me getting the V3 and does not like anything Remington was really impressed with the fit and finish off the gun. And while my father didn’t shoot the V3, he did hold it and shoulder it. He currently has an A5 which he hates. He was impressed with the weight of the V3 and how it felt. When I told him I only paid $499 for it new his jaw dropped. His only reservation was the cheek weld did not provide a good line of sight down the barrel. SHIMS SHIMS SHIMS!
Reliability: The gun performed flawlessly. I’ve not seen any reports of the V3 having reliability problems. I have nothing to report here except the gun has gone bang every time I’ve asked it to. No cycling problems to speak of. My brother was impressed with the reliability and ability to shoot the low brass 2 ¾ with no issues. My father was a bit jealous because he has issues during dove season with his A5 shooting low brass.
Disassembly: I can only comment on what I’ve taken apart so far. The gun field strips easily and goes back together easily. When putting the bolt back in, be sure not to press on the bolt face, but the bolt carrier only. Push it in even with the end of the receiver to make sure it lines up correctly for the bolt handle. The recoil springs are in the receiver and do not extend into the stock. This is great because you can use the available shims to get a great line of sight!!(okay that was crossed through in my word doc, but the format did not translate over and I can't figure out how to do that on my phone.) A great design by Remington that makes keeping all operating/moving parts cleaned and lubed a breeze. The bolt is easy to disassemble. I was able to take it apart and put back together with no tools. Makes cleaning very easy. A side note, I just started using frog lube and man that stuff is awesome!
On a scale of 1-10 I’d say this gun gets an 8.5. Yes I’m knocking it for not having shims and yes I’m knocking it for the gas blowing back in my face. Yes I wore glasses this time around. Yes, I still noticed it and it is still annoying on my Black Synthetic 28” model. For $499 at some online retailers you get a fantastic value with the V3. You get all the standard choke tubes that I’ll never use. I honestly think my dad would sell his A5 to get this gun. He and I both started our duck hunting hobbies shooting 870s and are both Remington fans. You get a written lifetime warranty (not implied like Ruger). Assuming Remington will continue being around this is a big deal. Before making this decision I wondered, “How much shotgun am I missing out on by not spending an extra $1,000-1500? Well, now that I’ve spent the money and compared it…..not much. There isn’t a lot of shotgun out there you don’t get if you spend $499 on the Remington V3.
8.5/10 Would buy again.



All of the pluses you found in your synthetic V3 are also found in the walnut V3 MINUS the gas blowback ( can`t happen. Different gas exhaust system but still Versaport ). The walnut is a couple of hundred bucks more and is a bit heavier ( around 7.5 ). Randy Wakeman says if anything, there`s slightly less recoil with the walnut. Of course, it does not come camoed. There are camo wraps out there ( used some for turkey ), they`re a bit of a pain, but not overly so IMO. I`m REALLY liking mine!


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 Post subject: Re: Remington V3 review shot beside a Benelli Super Vinci
PostPosted: Mon May 21, 2018 6:35 pm 
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Yea, I knew that.
I specifically mentioned it was synthetic because the last time I mentioned it Randy told me he had never had the issue, like I was imagining it or something. Well, you've got a different gas exhaust system Randy...so it makes sense that it could happen on mine and not yours.

I've got to believe that the gas system on the walnut is compatible with the synthetic...it's strange that Remington hasn't just streamlined the manufacturing into one gas system by now.


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 Post subject: Re: Remington V3 review shot beside a Benelli Super Vinci
PostPosted: Mon May 21, 2018 7:01 pm 
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Randy has at least one synthetic V3 that he had camo dipped. He can and likely will speak for himself about his opinion on the blowback problem.

I own a walnut V3 and while my gun has not demonstrated the blowback problem I personally have no doubt that the problem is very real. I have read that some tape applied in the right place has solved the issue. I have also read that sending the gun back to Remington in some cases has solved the problem, while in other cases it has not. If I were experiencing the problem I would first try the tape solution, but only because it is easy to do and would cost me nothing because I have many rolls of tape in my garage.

The differences in the gas systems between the synthetic and walnut versions are not huge, but the barrels, and fore-ends are not interchangeable. Well, I guess you could pair a synthetic gun barrel with a synthetic fore-end on a gun with a walnut stock. As I understand it you can't mix the barrels and fore-ends from different versions. Apparently there were some issues with the gas system on the synthetic guns causing the walnut fore-ends to crack so the walnut guns have a slightly different arrangement that means parts must be specific to the walnut guns. As far as I know you could interchange black synthetic parts with a camo synthetic gun.

As far as shims... Just make your own, that is what I did! I used a scrap of Kydex and spent some time with a belt sander to get the angle right. I cut the shape with a razor knife and then got it just right with the belt sander. I drilled the holes to match the holes in the existing shim. To install it I put the factory shim against the receiver, and then added my custom shim between the factory shim and the buttstock. The stock bolt ends up bending slightly when you tighten it, be careful not to cross thread it. I have not had any problems with mine. I did something very similar on my 870's years ago and they are still working fine.

Enjoy your V3, I sure do enjoy mine!

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 Post subject: Re: Remington V3 review shot beside a Benelli Super Vinci
PostPosted: Mon May 21, 2018 7:26 pm 
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Thanks! Any other thoughts on anything else?


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 Post subject: Re: Remington V3 review shot beside a Benelli Super Vinci
PostPosted: Mon May 21, 2018 9:14 pm 
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Prices vary be retailer, time of the year, and of course there are seasonal rebates and so forth.

Right now, Bud's sells the 26 inch V3 walnut for $713. The camo 26 inch is more, at least from Bud's, at $731, while the basic black 26 inch is $604.

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 Post subject: Re: Remington V3 review shot beside a Benelli Super Vinci
PostPosted: Mon May 21, 2018 11:43 pm 
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fblainen11 wrote:
Yea, I knew that.
I specifically mentioned it was synthetic because the last time I mentioned it Randy told me he had never had the issue, like I was imagining it or something. Well, you've got a different gas exhaust system Randy...so it makes sense that it could happen on mine and not yours.

I've got to believe that the gas system on the walnut is compatible with the synthetic...it's strange that Remington hasn't just streamlined the manufacturing into one gas system by now.


I have several V3's, but only one walnut. As the synthetic was released long before the walnut, of course I have been shooting V3 synthetic models longer, including a pre-production V3 since 2014. Coming up on four years later, the V3 isn't exactly breaking news.

No, the exhaust tubes on the walnut are not compatible with synthetic forearms.

I've hunted with the V3 not just in Illinois, but in Texas, Oklahoma, and Arkansas for nearly four years by now-- all with synthetic models. At this late date, there really isn't much left to report on that I haven't already reported on numerous times.

To say that there are huge changes at Remington is an understatement. http://money.cnn.com/2018/05/17/news/co ... index.html

In just the last two months, Remington has been in Chapter 11, and now they are out of it, with new ownership. Cerberus no longer has anything to do with Remington.

Quite understandably, all of this has temporarily put new projects in limbo. What the focus is going to be moving forward is up to the new owners and new management. The new owners have only been the owners for a few days.

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 Post subject: Re: Remington V3 review shot beside a Benelli Super Vinci
PostPosted: Tue May 22, 2018 7:20 am 
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RandyWakeman wrote:
fblainen11 wrote:
Yea, I knew that.
I specifically mentioned it was synthetic because the last time I mentioned it Randy told me he had never had the issue, like I was imagining it or something. Well, you've got a different gas exhaust system Randy...so it makes sense that it could happen on mine and not yours.

I've got to believe that the gas system on the walnut is compatible with the synthetic...it's strange that Remington hasn't just streamlined the manufacturing into one gas system by now.


I have several V3's, but only one walnut. As the synthetic was released long before the walnut, of course I have been shooting V3 synthetic models longer, including a pre-production V3 since 2014. Coming up on four years later, the V3 isn't exactly breaking news.

No, the exhaust tubes on the walnut are not compatible with synthetic forearms.

I've hunted with the V3 not just in Illinois, but in Texas, Oklahoma, and Arkansas for nearly four years by now-- all with synthetic models. At this late date, there really isn't much left to report on that I haven't already reported on numerous times.

To say that there are huge changes at Remington is an understatement. http://money.cnn.com/2018/05/17/news/co ... index.html

In just the last two months, Remington has been in Chapter 11, and now they are out of it, with new ownership. Cerberus no longer has anything to do with Remington.

Quite understandably, all of this has temporarily put new projects in limbo. What the focus is going to be moving forward is up to the new owners and new management. The new owners have only been the owners for a few days.



I REALLY,REALLY hope that at least some of the new guys at Remington have spent some time in a January duck blind in the rain, an early September dove field, at the trap and skeet range, walking behind a good bird dog, looking through a scope at a big buck 250 yds. out. If they have, I personally feel that the " new " Remington will have a much better chance at success. JMHO. I also think that the V3 gives them a good platform on the shotgun side starting off.


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 Post subject: Re: Remington V3 review shot beside a Benelli Super Vinci
PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2018 7:34 am 
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What "new guys"?

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 Post subject: Re: Remington V3 review shot beside a Benelli Super Vinci
PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2018 7:46 am 
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RandyWakeman wrote:
What "new guys"?


OK then, the same hope for the " old guys " :) . Just made an assumption that somewhere along the line there might be some changes/additions. Just hoping for a renewed commitment to excellence and an intense focus on what made Remington great, IMO, in the first place. It`s just been my experience (and practice when I`ve been in a position to do so ) than when a business/organization goes through significant change, it`s a golden opportunity to take a step back, reassess, and use that opportunity to be better than you were. That`s my hope for a company with which I literally grew up.


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 Post subject: Re: Remington V3 review shot beside a Benelli Super Vinci
PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2018 10:34 am 
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They are for sale, as is Savage Arms. It doesn't mean that they will be sold soon, when it happens there will be a press release and that will be the first anyone will hear of it.

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 Post subject: Re: Remington V3 review shot beside a Benelli Super Vinci
PostPosted: Tue May 29, 2018 6:20 pm 
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I had a super Vinci and sold it a few months after owning the V3. I'm loving mine and to be honest I've felt the blow back only a couple times in the first few outings and then never again so not sure why or what causes it but it's a non issue for me. Probably about 3000-4000 rounds through it now

Thanks for you post an interesting read

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 Post subject: Re: Remington V3 review shot beside a Benelli Super Vinci
PostPosted: Sat Jun 02, 2018 11:54 pm 
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I used an 870 before this. I'm enjoying it so far. I'll be interested to see if my dad ends up getting one. Not sure if I mentioned it, but he has the A5 in 3.5" and doesn't like it too much. He drove and duck hunts.
I need to let him get a little time with mine and convince him to get the V3. Before the A5 he used an 870 for 25 years....that gun still works perfectly and he's never cleaned it lol.

Edit: I'm glad you enjoyed the read.


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 Post subject: Re: Remington V3 review shot beside a Benelli Super Vinci
PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2018 1:19 pm 
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fblainen11 wrote:
Thanks! Any other thoughts on anything else?


The V3 is the best 12 gauge auto Remington has ever made. As far as I'm concerned, they need to do a couple of things to make it an all-time hit for everyone. It is going to take more models, for it has been just the synthetic for years, now just synthetic and the base walnut.

Image

The above example is a pre-production prototype I've been shooting since 2014.

Originally, I was told that the V3 would have shims. That was delayed, and then the ball was dropped. The last I heard, "shims were back on." Since that time, a lot has happened. Gun sales tanked, Remington has been in and now successfully out of Chapter 11, and today, gun sales are soaring . . . three straight months of all-time record sales. It isn't being driven by Joe Duckhunter or Betty Doveblaster. It is pistols and AR-15's, and that isn't the V3.

The gas venting system on the walnut, the tube array, is superior to the synthetic. It only makes sense to standardize. That means new a forearm redesign on the synthetic models, new tooling, etc., to accommodate the exhaust tubes.

While they are at it, they might as well get the bloody shims done. I don't need them. personally, but that isn't the point. Some people either need them or just want them, and no one would object to having them available. Remington can also take what they have learned from the last three years of 12 gauge production and apply it to a V3 20 gauge out of the gate.

The V3 begs for tactical / turkey hunting models and also higher grade upland and clays models to fill out the line. I personally would appreciate a "Waterfowl Pro" version, just like they did with the Versa-Max. Others have different ideas. The walnut version has one massive hunk of walnut for the buttstock. That could be channeled out and would lighten the V3 walnut model a bit which at least I would appreciate.

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 Post subject: Re: Remington V3 review shot beside a Benelli Super Vinci
PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2018 1:32 pm 
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RandyWakeman wrote:
fblainen11 wrote:
Thanks! Any other thoughts on anything else?


The V3 is the best 12 gauge auto Remington has ever made. As far as I'm concerned, they need to do a couple of things to make it an all-time hit for everyone. It is going to take more models, for it has been just the synthetic for years, now just synthetic and the base walnut.

Image

The above example is a pre-production prototype I've been shooting since 2014.

Originally, I was told that the V3 would have shims. That was delayed, and then the ball was dropped. The last I heard, "shims were back on." Since that time, a lot has happened. Gun sales tanked, Remington has been in and now successfully out of Chapter 11, and today, gun sales are soaring . . . three straight months of all-time record sales. It isn't being driven by Joe Duckhunter or Betty Doveblaster. It is pistols and AR-15's, and that isn't the V3.

The gas venting system on the walnut, the tube array, is superior to the synthetic. It only makes sense to standardize. That means new a forearm redesign on the synthetic models, new tooling, etc., to accommodate the exhaust tubes.

While they are at it, they might as well get the bloody shims done. I don't need them. personally, but that isn't the point. Some people either need them or just want them, and no one would object to having them available. Remington can also take what they have learned from the last three years of 12 gauge production and apply it to a V3 20 gauge out of the gate.

The V3 begs for tactical / turkey hunting models and also higher grade upland and clays models to fill out the line. I personally would appreciate a "Waterfowl Pro" version, just like they did with the Versa-Max. Others have different ideas. The walnut version has one massive hunk of walnut for the buttstock. That could be channeled out and would lighten the V3 walnut model a bit which at least I would appreciate.


All very good suggestions. I’d assume you mentioned this to them as I know you have a good relationship with them. Hopefully they listen as everything you said is exactly what people want

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 Post subject: Re: Remington V3 review shot beside a Benelli Super Vinci
PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2018 1:54 pm 
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Sure I have, but Randy doesn't always get what he wants. :lol: :lol: :lol:

All of this stuff takes significant resources and there is a balance, somewhere, between what engineering and product managers would like to see, and what actually is approved from upper management. The Chapter 11 in and out naturally put a lot of things into turmoil in all of the product segments, and that is something that engineering, R & D, and product managers had no role in, nor did the talent on the production side.

I have long conversations with the Presidents of two large firearm companies. Plastic gun sales are 90% of the market. New products reflect what people actually buy, not what they claim they are going to buy. It isn't always the exact same thing.

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 Post subject: Re: Remington V3 review shot beside a Benelli Super Vinci
PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2018 5:53 pm 
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RandyWakeman wrote:
Sure I have, but Randy doesn't always get what he wants. :lol: :lol: :lol:

All of this stuff takes significant resources and there is a balance, somewhere, between what engineering and product managers would like to see, and what actually is approved from upper management. The Chapter 11 in and out naturally put a lot of things into turmoil in all of the product segments, and that is something that engineering, R & D, and product managers had no role in, nor did the talent on the production side.

I have long conversations with the Presidents of two large firearm companies. Plastic gun sales are 90% of the market. New products reflect what people actually buy, not what they claim they are going to buy. It isn't always the exact same thing.


Bass Pro Shop Summer Shooting catalog. 2 pages of very limited shotguns ( couple of Browning models, couple of Berettas, a Winchester, a Stoeger ) , 1 1/2 pages of AR style rifles, 10 PAGES OF HANDGUNS, 4 PAGES OF HOLSTERS AND CLIP CARRIERS. Not hard to figure out where the business is in firearms.


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 Post subject: Re: Remington V3 review shot beside a Benelli Super Vinci
PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2018 6:57 pm 
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Posts: 134
RandyWakeman wrote:
The gas venting system on the walnut, the tube array, is superior to the synthetic. It only makes sense to standardize. That means new a forearm redesign on the synthetic models, new tooling, etc., to accommodate the exhaust tubes.

Sorry, but I couldn't disagree more. The V3 Field Sport Synthetic (FSS) utilizes gas compensating plugs whereas it's my understanding the walnut model only has vent pipes...no gas compensation mechanism. Why get rid of that additional layer of versatility?...unless you're advocating pipes on the end of the compensation plugs.

The compensating plugs are the primary reason I became interested in the V3...over the Versa Max which also has no gas compensation. In my experience, the VM has issues handling high performance "baby magnum" 2.75" shells...the V3 FSS should have no issues as the plugs vent the additional pressure. It was interesting to me that after the 1st outing with our (3) V3 FSS' that the ends of the compensating plugs were quite dirty with carbon...which means they were venting pressure even with the Gun Clubs and Winchester Promotional shells we were running through the guns.

I am most definitely FOR keeping the Versaport Compensation Plugs

RandyWakeman wrote:
The V3 begs for tactical / turkey hunting models and also higher grade upland and clays models to fill out the line.


Agreed.



This pic is for kuffs06...he wanted to see one of my 6.9# V3's with the barrel cut back to 23.5"
Image

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Browning, Maxim, Vickers
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 Post subject: Re: Remington V3 review shot beside a Benelli Super Vinci
PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2018 7:17 pm 
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hkg3k wrote:
RandyWakeman wrote:
The gas venting system on the walnut, the tube array, is superior to the synthetic. It only makes sense to standardize. That means new a forearm redesign on the synthetic models, new tooling, etc., to accommodate the exhaust tubes.

Sorry, but I couldn't disagree more. The V3 Field Sport Synthetic (FSS) utilizes gas compensating plugs whereas it's my understanding the walnut model only has vent pipes...no gas compensation mechanism. Why get rid of that additional layer of versatility?



There is no additional layer of versatility. The tubes compensate far better as is than the plugs, and are far, far more versatile.

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 Post subject: Re: Remington V3 review shot beside a Benelli Super Vinci
PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2018 9:17 pm 
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RandyWakeman wrote:
There is no additional layer of versatility. The tubes compensate far better as is than the plugs, and are far, far more versatile.


Please explain how one version of the V3 Versaport which simply vents and directs gas through a pipe somehow compensates pressure better than the other version which has both a vent and an active spring loaded pressure valve...please explain that in the context of using high-performance 2.75" "magnum" shells.



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Browning, Maxim, Vickers
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