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 Post subject: WD 40
PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2006 7:26 am 
Tournament Grade

Joined: Wed Dec 06, 2006 6:12 pm
Posts: 166
First of all ... Thanks to everyone who has answered all of my previous questions. Secondly ... Happy x-mas to you all. Last of all , my question.

Before i put my shothun away, i spray the whole thing with WD40. i have been told by a friend that this will soften the wood !!! . Is this correct ?

What is the best method to store your gun to avoid rust etc etc.

Hope you can help ?

Cheers

Jim




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 Post subject: re: WD 40
PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2006 7:29 am 
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Joined: Wed Dec 06, 2006 6:12 pm
Posts: 166
Just read my own add. I spotted all the spelling mistakes and other errors .... must of had too many Old nomber 7's last night. :roll:


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 Post subject: re: WD 40
PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2006 8:19 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 29, 2005 10:02 pm
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Location: Central Pennsylvania and Southwest Florida
I was told by no less than six gunsmiths that you should never use WD40 on firearms. I forget all of the reasons why but now only use Rem Oil. There are those that will claim that these gunsmiths don't know their business but I will go with the professional every time.

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 Post subject: re: WD 40
PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2006 8:40 am 
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Joined: Wed Nov 23, 2005 3:12 pm
Posts: 780
This WD - 40 argument has been going on for sometime around here. I use it on the OUTSIDE of guns and use Breakfree or Remoil on the INSIDE. Either way keep any oil off the wood. The reason I don't use WD 40 on the inside is it will dry out overtime and those parts in there need to be kept coated so they don't develop rust. The outside gets a regular wipe with WD after I am done shooting to remove condensation or rain drops before putting in the case. WD = Water Displacing

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 Post subject: re: WD 40
PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2006 9:12 am 
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Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 3:48 pm
Posts: 1286
Location: Michigan
WD40 drys to a very thin laquer like coating that some people think will interfere with the mechanism of the gun. This coating is about .0001 thick, so it would take many coats to build up to where it would cause a problem but I suppose it could over time.

I have used it for about 30 years and find it to be a great rust preventer and a fairly good penetrant. So far, I have had no problems with it gumming up the action. As far as the wood goes, I don't know about that, though I have seen no damage on my guns wood finnish and I do not try to avoid getting it on the wood.

If I had a fine swiss watch of the old style with gears and such, I probably would not use WD40 on it, but on a shotgun or a rifle, I would be surprised if it evet built up to where it was a problem. I consider this "never use WD40 on a gun" stuff to be largly a myth.

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The above is only my opinion and is not carved in stone.


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 Post subject: Re: WD 40
PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2006 9:22 am 
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Joined: Sun Apr 04, 2004 7:14 pm
Posts: 4573
Location: SoCal
[quote="JimLittleDevil"]
Before i put my shothun away, i spray the whole thing with WD40. i have been told by a friend that this will soften the wood !!! . Is this correct ?


:idea: yup, keep the oil on the metal not the wood!
If you want something for the wood used good old furniture polish! :wink:


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 Post subject: re: WD 40
PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2006 9:35 am 
Crown Grade

Joined: Thu Dec 09, 2004 4:40 pm
Posts: 2345
Happy Holidays Jim! While WD-40 has some positive attributes, it does have a few negative oones too.

First off, WD-40 does contain a percentage of water. By it's own specification it can contain up to about 6 or 8%. I too have heard that over time, excess WD-40 can cause the wood to go soft. But hey, I don't sit my gun stock into a tub of this stuff! And I certainly don't spray my gun(s) down with it until it drips off.

Long before there were aerosol cans of "gunscruber" or gun cleaner. Theres was and is WD-40. With it's little nozzle tip, I use/used WD-40 as a cleaning solvent, to flush the receiver out and do quick wipe downs of the metal. I keep a can in the duck blind. A few times each year I go duck hunting for canvas backs and that means brachish water or salt water depending on the tide. I carry a can of Wd-40. As we all know salt water spray can be very hard on blued guns!!

WD-40 is great for a quick wipe down of the metal after you get out of the field to remove that salts, and minerals that your hands got on the gun. However I do not recomend it for for essential lubrication of moving parts, or long term rust preventative. Gun oil and gun grease is best used hear.

The two most popular gun oils seem to be Remoil and Outers, both have a "rust preventative" in them and certainly provide a much greater protection barrier on the metal than WD-40. But like I said, it's great as a flushing solvent, and quick wipe downs!

Regards Dave


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 Post subject: re: WD 40
PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2006 9:55 am 
Tournament Grade

Joined: Wed Dec 06, 2006 6:12 pm
Posts: 166
OK FOLKS ..... I will bow to your superior knowledge and only use it on the metal parts to wipe it over. :D


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 Post subject: re: WD 40
PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2006 10:39 am 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 6:42 pm
Posts: 1130
Location: Tucson, AZ
WD-40 is one of the best rust preventatives, but as they say, it will "dry" over time. It is great for damascus guns, after the regular cleaning process, to disperse any water that may be hiding in the bores.

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 Post subject: re: WD 40
PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2006 12:06 pm 
Crown Grade

Joined: Sat Dec 02, 2006 7:59 pm
Posts: 4777
Having lived in Florida where steel rusts within a very short time of being bare, have found WD-40 to be a poor rust preventive. I was having trouble with rust on critical parts of a tube bender for bending race car tubing to form it into a role cage. I call the manufacture, also a Floridian, and told him about the rust, he asked what lube I was using and I said WD-40, plenty of it and regularly. He said..."No wonder!" WD-40 was apperently designed to be a moisture remover and degreaser, not a rust preventor. Per his request, and he said he would replace the parts if they didn't stop rusting, provided I was using a different lube, I switched to Tri Lube, an expensive synthetic, and low and behold...never had a nother problme with rust.

Merry Christmas to one and all,


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 Post subject: re: WD 40
PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2006 12:18 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 10, 2006 6:38 pm
Posts: 1161
Location: S. Louisiana
[/quote]First off, WD-40 does contain a percentage of water. By it's own specification it can contain up to about 6 or 8%.

No, I'm sorry to rain on the parade, it does not contain any water. In fact WD-40 is insoluble in water. If there was, through some error in packaging, water in the can it would be the first substance to exit through the nozzle. I'll include the Material Safety Data Sheet for your inspection. http://www.wd40.com/Brands/pdfs/msds-wd ... sol.us.pdf

ALL Hydrocarbons (oil based products) are volatile (Meaning they will turn gaseous)(evaporate). Some faster than others. WD-40 has a small percentage of oil, so when the thinning, penetrating, carrying distillate evaporates there is not much protectant (oil) left. This too will evaporate albiet at a slower rate. Leaving behind an ever increasingly thickening oil. Because this oil is of natural base it tends to oxidize faster turning yellow then brown, even black if left long enough, than a synthetic oil will. Synthetics resist oxidation longer. Rem oil and others like it use a synthetic oil base. That's what make them better.

I'm sorry, WD-40 will NOT build up. You can take that to the bank. The aliphatic distillate (penetrant/carrier) in WD-40 will immediately dissolve the residue left behind from the previous cleaning. Yes, it will also quickly soak into unprotected wood, carrying oil with it and soften it. All of our products will do this. Oiled stocks and to a lesser degree old laquer type finishes are more susceptible to damage than the almost impenetrable urathane finishes.

I am amazed at the amount of wives tales that still abound about WD-40. The only thing that really differentiates it from a product like Rem Oil is the amount of oil it contains and the type of oil. Rem Oil is definately better but it also cost a lot more and you probably wouldn't want clean your gun with it. WD is just great for cleaning. I'd blow it out or wipe as much of it as possible from the gun afterwards and replace it with a better product though.

If I were a gun smith I certainly would not go around making such ignorant statements as mentioned in the previous posts and I'd certainly be wary of those that do.

BTW, the reason we have to keep resurfacing our blacktop roads in this country is because the tar (oil) that binds the aggregate into the matrix we call blacktop evaporates, leaving behind a brittle, shrinking mess. Same thing, just slower.

Well everybody is beginning to arrive....I must go now.

Bob


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 Post subject: re: WD 40
PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2006 12:26 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 24, 2003 3:31 pm
Posts: 17882
Location: Kearney NE
I don't like WD-40, nor do I like any kind of spray on crap! I like something that does wipe on with a rag and leaves a noticable film, say like the old Browning gun oil. Heck as a kid my dad just dumped a little 10 wt non-detergent motor oil in the oil can and we used that. The old Models 12s, 42s, A-5s, Browning 22 Autos, Model 70s, Browning Safaris, and Sakos don't look to much the worse for it either! I suppose if WD-40 is all you have, it is better than nothing, but not what I like. Don't like rem oil either!

BP

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 Post subject: Re: re: WD 40
PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2006 3:07 pm 
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Joined: Sat Mar 20, 2004 12:01 am
Posts: 1267
Bob Stander wrote:
First off, WD-40 does contain a percentage of water. By it's own specification it can contain up to about 6 or 8%.

No, I'm sorry to rain on the parade, it does not contain any water. In fact WD-40 is insoluble in water. If there was, through some error in packaging, water in the can it would be the first substance to exit through the nozzle. I'll include the Material Safety Data Sheet for your inspection. http://www.wd40.com/Brands/pdfs/msds-wd ... sol.us.pdf

ALL Hydrocarbons (oil based products) are volatile (Meaning they will turn gaseous)(evaporate). Some faster than others. WD-40 has a small percentage of oil, so when the thinning, penetrating, carrying distillate evaporates there is not much protectant (oil) left. This too will evaporate albiet at a slower rate. Leaving behind an ever increasingly thickening oil. Because this oil is of natural base it tends to oxidize faster turning yellow then brown, even black if left long enough, than a synthetic oil will. Synthetics resist oxidation longer. Rem oil and others like it use a synthetic oil base. That's what make them better.

I'm sorry, WD-40 will NOT build up. You can take that to the bank. The aliphatic distillate (penetrant/carrier) in WD-40 will immediately dissolve the residue left behind from the previous cleaning. Yes, it will also quickly soak into unprotected wood, carrying oil with it and soften it. All of our products will do this. Oiled stocks and to a lesser degree old laquer type finishes are more susceptible to damage than the almost impenetrable urathane finishes.

I am amazed at the amount of wives tales that still abound about WD-40. The only thing that really differentiates it from a product like Rem Oil is the amount of oil it contains and the type of oil. Rem Oil is definately better but it also cost a lot more and you probably wouldn't want clean your gun with it. WD is just great for cleaning. I'd blow it out or wipe as much of it as possible from the gun afterwards and replace it with a better product though.

If I were a gun smith I certainly would not go around making such ignorant statements as mentioned in the previous posts and I'd certainly be wary of those that do.

BTW, the reason we have to keep resurfacing our blacktop roads in this country is because the tar (oil) that binds the aggregate into the matrix we call blacktop evaporates, leaving behind a brittle, shrinking mess. Same thing, just slower.

Well everybody is beginning to arrive....I must go now.

Bob[/quote]

Here, Here now. Don't be spreading fact!


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 Post subject: re: WD 40
PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2006 3:55 pm 
Field Grade

Joined: Tue Jun 13, 2006 9:52 am
Posts: 57
Guys, take a look. I found it at berettausa.com

Question
What should I use to clean my Beretta firearm?

Answer
Exterior metal parts need only to be wiped down with gun oil to remove hand acids, salts and to prevent corrosion. Caution: Never use products such as WD-40 or other lubricants that are advertised as "rust busters" on exterior metal components. Many metallic exterior surfaces of firearms are finished with "bluing". Bluing is an acronym for "black oxide", which is a controlled form of oxidization. Rust or corrosion penetrating lubricants may adversely affect these finishes. When choosing a firearms lubricant discuss with your dealer what brands they sell that have been found to resist gumming or drying out over an extended period of time. Never use a bore solvent to clean plastic, wood or exterior metal surfaces with out first spot testing in an area not normally visible. Today's cleaning solvents are very powerful chemicals and may damage these parts or finishes. Use caution if using Hoppes #9 on nickel plated parts. Many manufacturers have found that Hoppes #9 will damage nickel finished parts if it left in contact with the parts for any length of time. Birchwood Casey GunScrubber® formerly had an adverse affect on the Jordan Outdoor Enterprises camo finishes found on many firearms. Birchwood Casey has addressed this problem and GunScurbber with a label that announces "Camo Finish Safe", or words to that effect, should be safe to use. This FAQ will be updated as more information is available on Gun Scrubber and camo finishes. There are many brand name firearm cleaning solvents that your Beretta dealer may stock or be able to order for you. These solvents are effective in removing residue in the barrel and carbon and dirt build up from action parts. If you shoot mainly ammunition with copper jacketed bullets you may want to ask your dealer about one of the bore solvents that aggressively removes copper fouling from the barrel. Also, there are solvents that are formulated to be most effective on lead bullet fouling. Ultrasonic cleaners, such as used by police agencies, are a great way to clean a handgun. These cleaners typically use either a biodegradable or ammonia based cleaning solution. Beretta recommends the use of the biodegradable solutions as there is some evidence to indicate that the ammonia based solutions will damage the anodized finish on aluminum parts. biodegradable solutions are frequently water-based. After cleaning it is imperative that all pin and screw holes and undercut or recessed areas be thoroughly dried and lubricated to prevent corrosion.


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 Post subject: re: WD 40
PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2006 4:33 pm 
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Joined: Thu Dec 09, 2004 4:40 pm
Posts: 2345
Merry Christmas everone! Hmmmmm, I can understand some questioning the water content of WD-40. But to post an MSDS sheet and try to pass that off as the last word seems ignorant to me.

Now maybe because an MSDS sheet is suppose to be a "scientific document" it's the last word on the subject. Now if our previous posters took the time to read the document, Ref: Block II Hazordous Ingredients, at the bottom of that block it shows;

Non-hazardous Ingredients < 10%

That would mean up to 9.999 or 9.9999 % is Non-hazardous. The last time I checked H20 (water) was non-hazardous.

To put that in perspective 1 gallon equals 128 ounces, that would mean approximately 12.78 ounces floating around in a gallon of WD-40. That's like a soda can full of some non-hazardous chemical.

The first time I ran across this was about 35 years ago while working in the US Navy's Metrology program. (Metrology is the science of measurement). While using WD-40 as a "rust preventative" on some mechanical standards we were still experiencing oxidation, (rust). Since we were procuring WD-40 in 1 gallon cans. We emptied a can into a clear container, and soon after, several off white, clouds settled at the bottom. We had this analyzed in the Chem Lab. It was "H2O" water.

Now since every lot or batch of WD-40 can vary in chemical content, (notice the range on the ingredients in Block II of the posted MSDS sheet). If every chemical was on the high side you would end up with 96% chemicals and 4% Non-hazardous chemical. On the low side you would have approx. 75% chemicals, does that mean you would then have 25% of an unknown Non-hazardous substance, No, because it's suppose to be less than 10%. It means that lot or batch would be rejected, and not sold.

Now before we have any more on the subject one might want to buy a gallon and have thier own Chem Lab analyze the contents. I've been through this about a half dozen times already, all with the same results.

Happy Holidays to all

Dave


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 Post subject: re: WD 40
PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2006 4:58 pm 
Crown Grade

Joined: Sat Dec 02, 2006 7:59 pm
Posts: 4777
Hi Dave, if your say'n we can't discuss WD in a civil, non-hurranging way on this form, you better kick my skinny, Browning shoot'n, clay bust'n butt right off of here.

Best to all,


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 Post subject: re: WD 40
PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2006 5:09 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jun 20, 2005 10:45 pm
Posts: 1356
Location: Western New York
I, too, stick with WD-40 as a mild bore solvent (i.e., if I've only fired a few shells and there's not a ton of plastic wad buildup) and as the metal protectant for the exterior surfaces of all my firearms. I especially like the fact that it gets into crevices and cracks and floats any moisture off--something that an oil will not do. My theory as to why WD-40 is so often maligned is that some shooters feel that unless they are paying roughly the same price for their rust preventative oil as they are paying for the same quantity of a 12-year old bourbon, they are not paying enough. I switched to WD-40 after having rust show up on my guns treated with Birchwood-Casey Sheath. But my personal experience is certainly no better than that of anyone else's on this board.

For a more authoritative perspective, I'd suggest you go to the Brownell's web site by copying and pasting the following link into your browser address bar(http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/GunTec ... &t=1&i=503) and decide for yourself whether their plates of raw steel tested for rust prevention with many of the various rust prevetatives previously mentioned have more or less rust on them than the plate of steel protected by WD-40. Sure looks to me like other than RIG or Cosmoline (both of which are intended only for long-term storage of guns because they pick up every speck of grit and dirt around in the field), only Boeshield may hold a slight advantage over WD-40 in preventing rust or pitting. Given the fact that Brownell's actually sells all of the other, higher-priced alternatives, WD-40's performance on this test certainly speaks volumes about not only its rust-preventative qualities but Brownell's professional integrity.


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 Post subject: re: WD 40
PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2006 5:16 pm 
Crown Grade

Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 2:19 pm
Posts: 6090
Location: Herefordshire, United Kingdom
perdizhunter posted
Quote:
Bluing is an acronym for "black oxide", which is a controlled form of oxidization.


Harrumph.

The acronym for "black oxide" is B.O. but I understand B.O. is more commonly understood to indicate something else altogether! I think you may have meant synonym.

WD 40 is a very useful dewatering medium for metalwork. As a short term first aid for wet gun barrels and mechanisms it can't be beaten. ferinstance it's SOP with me after coastal wilfowling. After about 6 years on a AL391 the blacking is still...well, black. It's lubricating properties are minimal so after dewatering the correct oils and greases (as per manufacturers instructions) are required.

Long term it probably could damage woodwork by virtue of carrying in oils dissolved from other areas.....but you'ld need to be pretty ham fisted.

Regards
Eug


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 Post subject: re: WD 40
PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2006 5:49 pm 
Crown Grade

Joined: Sun Feb 13, 2005 2:20 pm
Posts: 4480
Location: Pointe Coupee Parish, South La.
I am like Bob Stander in that I use Wd-40 to spray down the bbl's of my shotguns and then wipe it out using a folded rolled up paper towel. This after seveal wipes is followed up by Rem-oil down the bores. The action is treated the same way. Before Rem-Oil it was Clp. However, I like Rem-Oil better. JMHO.


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 Post subject: re: WD 40
PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2006 7:02 pm 
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Joined: Sat Nov 18, 2006 8:37 pm
Posts: 13
This is from wd-40's website. In the FAQ section.

What does WD-40 contain?
While the ingredients in WD-40 are secret, we can tell you what WD-40 does NOT contain. WD-40 does not contain silicone, kerosene, water, wax, graphite, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), or any known cancer-causing agents.

What about using WD-40 on my sports equipment?
WD-40 is safe and effective to use on all types of sporting goods. Use WD-40 on your bike to clean, degrease and lubricate your chain, derailleur, gears, cogs, and moving parts. It will help remove stickers. Use WD-40 to clean and protect your gun. It will prevent corrosion and it won't damage bluing.

heres the link if you want it.
http://www.wd40.com/Brands/wd40_faqs.html




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