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 Post subject: Re: Upland boots
PostPosted: Wed Mar 31, 2021 8:29 pm 
Tournament Grade

Joined: Sat Nov 14, 2020 9:38 am
Posts: 121
Location: North Bay Area
+1 for getting the right boots, for the right job.

For walking around fields I've tried- Filsons Uplander (USA Made), the craftsmanship was fantastic, but they were too damn heavy. Had a pair of Wood N Stream kangaroo (USA Made), loved how light they were, but the soles were too stiff for me. Recently got a pair of Danner Sierras (USA Made), they're a bit stiff, but not as bad as my Wood N Streams.

I also have a pair of Schnees Kestrels for rougher country and they're fantastic boots.

I spent time in the Army as an Infantryman, was a rough framer for over a decade and until an injury ran 50 miles a week. So you can safely assume my body is pretty trashed.

Long story short, the older I get the more I become a fan of highly cushioned boots :lol: .




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 Post subject: Re: Upland boots
PostPosted: Thu Apr 01, 2021 8:27 am 
Presentation Grade
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Joined: Tue Apr 25, 2006 1:46 pm
Posts: 513
Location: MN.
MNGunner wrote:
Time to get new boots. I can't find upland boots that can withstand where I grouse/pheasant hunt. If there's any type of seem/moc toe across the toe, it's ripped apart and shoe-gooed within 3 years. Cabelas, Irish setter

I feel your pain, then again we likely hunt the same type areas. From the tip of the Mn. Arrowhead to SD. When I had Russell build my Grand Slam Sheep Hunters I had them put an extra piece of leather on the toe cap for that very reason.

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Had them built an extra 2" tall and air bob soles because that is what are on my rubber boots and like them. Had them built 15 years ago and take care of them, they are as good as the day that I got them. But haven't worn them for the last 3 years I have gone to Crispi boots and now have 6 pair LOL, but Crispi are all I wear on my feet now. Everyday of the year.

kj wrote:
Kenetrek mountain extreme

I have cartilage damage on both sides of my ankle. Surgery did not fix it.

The only thing that helped were my Kenetrek's best boots I have ever had by far.

When you get to the "Best" boots it boils down to Kenetrek or Crispi. Like many I went with Crispi, the models with the A.B.S.S. (Ankle Bone Support System).

A search of Kenetrek vs. Crispi and you can get a good idea of the subtle differences from the results of that search. Crispi have more sole flex which is good for upland but they are both great boots. I've had a lot of boots over the years LOL, and Kenetrek and Crispi are at the top of the list. Between the 2 I would say it boils down to which fits your feet better. Most Danners fit me well (somewhat narrow foot) but I trash a pair of Danner's in less than 3 years. And there is no comparison in support.

I use the Hunter (HTX) for hunting

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And Guide (GTX) in rotation. The Guides were brand new out of the box then. The rand is high enough at the toe that I have had no issues with wear.


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 Post subject: Re: Upland boots
PostPosted: Thu Apr 01, 2021 9:17 pm 
Limited Edition

Joined: Fri Dec 02, 2011 8:05 pm
Posts: 455
Cold Iron wrote:
MNGunner wrote:
Time to get new boots. I can't find upland boots that can withstand where I grouse/pheasant hunt. If there's any type of seem/moc toe across the toe, it's ripped apart and shoe-gooed within 3 years. Cabelas, Irish setter

I feel your pain, then again we likely hunt the same type areas. From the tip of the Mn. Arrowhead to SD. When I had Russell build my Grand Slam Sheep Hunters I had them put an extra piece of leather on the toe cap for that very reason.

Image

Had them built an extra 2" tall and air bob soles because that is what are on my rubber boots and like them. Had them built 15 years ago and take care of them, they are as good as the day that I got them. But haven't worn them for the last 3 years I have gone to Crispi boots and now have 6 pair LOL, but Crispi are all I wear on my feet now. Everyday of the year.

kj wrote:
Kenetrek mountain extreme

I have cartilage damage on both sides of my ankle. Surgery did not fix it.

The only thing that helped were my Kenetrek's best boots I have ever had by far.

When you get to the "Best" boots it boils down to Kenetrek or Crispi. Like many I went with Crispi, the models with the A.B.S.S. (Ankle Bone Support System).

A search of Kenetrek vs. Crispi and you can get a good idea of the subtle differences from the results of that search. Crispi have more sole flex which is good for upland but they are both great boots. I've had a lot of boots over the years LOL, and Kenetrek and Crispi are at the top of the list. Between the 2 I would say it boils down to which fits your feet better. Most Danners fit me well (somewhat narrow foot) but I trash a pair of Danner's in less than 3 years. And there is no comparison in support.

I use the Hunter (HTX) for hunting

Image

And Guide (GTX) in rotation. The Guides were brand new out of the box then. The rand is high enough at the toe that I have had no issues with wear.


Yep, we do hunt the same areas! Though for me it's more Grand Rapids to SD--I haven't hunted in the Arrowhead for a few decades now (but I should get back there!).

My wife bought me another pair of Irish Setters for Christmas. I didn't have the heart to tell her I was thinking of Danners (or now I'd like to look at those others you mentioned). She was so happy giving me these boots.

I pre-shoe gooed all the seams by the toe just to see if doing it before they are beat to hell will make them last longer. Well, if I get another three years, then maybe I'll try some Kenetreks


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 Post subject: Re: Upland boots
PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2021 9:14 am 
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Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2018 12:32 pm
Posts: 739
nwcanoe wrote:
I ordered a pair of LL Bean upland boots, and they arrived yesterday. Initial reaction; they look good, not made in USA, but Beans backs them with their outstanding warranty. I will wear them around the place for a few days and see how they feel. If they don't work, back they go. The warranty and responses from this thread helped me with the decision. After I placed the order, I came across the Russell Co video. If the Beans don't work I think I will dig deep and order a pair of Russells. I have been advised to buy from Filsons, but they don't stand behind their products. Their warranty is for normal life and wear of product and they decide what is normal. Their sales people were really condescending and they don't make their boots anyway and the price is close to what Russells cost. I will let you know.


I'd like to hear the update. I've owned several pairs of Danner Acadia boots. However I've never gotten the life out of them that others claim. Waterproof and fit are primary factors that keep me going back for another pair.
https://www.danner.com/men/tactical/aca ... -200g.html

I've owned kangaroo boots before. They were good boots but they didn't fit me as well as the Danners. Half the price.
https://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/121863? ... yId=121863

Filson warranty sucks. I've owned multiple wool and tin cloth Filson garments including hats, chaps and coats. I have personal experience with multiple items that don't hold up to normal wear. Filson will not repair anything, will not back anything. Won't fix anything even if you are willing to pay. They are just down the road from me and have been in there to talk to them. They claim they have seamstresses working on site but they won't throw a stitch on anything once you've paid your money. Piss on Filson, I won't buy another piece from them.

_________________
Tradition is not the worship of ashes, but the preservation of fire. -Gustav Mahler


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 Post subject: Re: Upland boots
PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2021 10:14 am 
Tournament Grade

Joined: Thu Dec 27, 2018 10:16 am
Posts: 181
Eibar wrote:
Danner makes the best boots, period. Red Wing offers some great upland boots. At times you’ll need a pair of Lacrosse rubber boots.

I was issued a pair of danners for work. They never fit right. They are still in my closet and look like new, even though they are over 10 years old. I have high arches and wide feet. I also hike a lot over miles of rocky terrain. I’ve learned that there is no one boot that’s right for everyone. People put pressure on different areas of their foot, arches are different, and foot shape is as well. Personally, Merrill Moabs are the boot I usually wear for everything from hiking to any hunting that involves a lot of walking over dry terrain.


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 Post subject: Re: Upland boots
PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2021 2:12 pm 
Field Grade

Joined: Thu Jul 21, 2011 8:03 pm
Posts: 59
Russell


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 Post subject: Re: Upland boots
PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2021 8:37 pm 
Field Grade

Joined: Mon Feb 15, 2021 10:13 pm
Posts: 93
Hal4son wrote:
nwcanoe wrote:
I ordered a pair of LL Bean upland boots, and they arrived yesterday. Initial reaction; they look good, not made in USA, but Beans backs them with their outstanding warranty. I will wear them around the place for a few days and see how they feel. If they don't work, back they go. The warranty and responses from this thread helped me with the decision. After I placed the order, I came across the Russell Co video. If the Beans don't work I think I will dig deep and order a pair of Russells. I have been advised to buy from Filsons, but they don't stand behind their products. Their warranty is for normal life and wear of product and they decide what is normal. Their sales people were really condescending and they don't make their boots anyway and the price is close to what Russells cost. I will let you know.


I'd like to hear the update. I've owned several pairs of Danner Acadia boots. However I've never gotten the life out of them that others claim. Waterproof and fit are primary factors that keep me going back for another pair.
https://www.danner.com/men/tactical/aca ... -200g.html

I've owned kangaroo boots before. They were good boots but they didn't fit me as well as the Danners. Half the price.
https://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/121863? ... yId=121863

Filson warranty sucks. I've owned multiple wool and tin cloth Filson garments including hats, chaps and coats. I have personal experience with multiple items that don't hold up to normal wear. Filson will not repair anything, will not back anything. Won't fix anything even if you are willing to pay. They are just down the road from me and have been in there to talk to them. They claim they have seamstresses working on site but they won't throw a stitch on anything once you've paid your money. Piss on Filson, I won't buy another piece from them.



Agree. Filson has turned hipster. Filson’s not half the man he used to be. Piss on Filson.


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 Post subject: Re: Upland boots
PostPosted: Thu Apr 15, 2021 9:13 pm 
Utility Grade

Joined: Sun Feb 11, 2018 8:51 pm
Posts: 3
Nobody wears Thorogood Flyways? Waterproof, American-made, classic moc toe like Dad wore, and priced about right. I have had Danner Grouse hunters, Irish Setter Wingshooters and several others but the Thorogoods are the best I have found. I realize comfort is highly subjective but worth a look in my opinion.

Dave


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 Post subject: Re: Upland boots
PostPosted: Thu Apr 15, 2021 10:51 pm 
Tournament Grade

Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2021 2:57 pm
Posts: 224
I happily wore Danners for 25-30 years, then switched to Kenetrek, and haven’t looked back. But boots are so subjective, there’s no way to define best. Whatever works for anyone is best.


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 Post subject: Re: Upland boots
PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2021 6:42 am 
Crown Grade
User avatar

Joined: Mon May 27, 2013 7:19 pm
Posts: 2026
Location: Indian Head Country Wisconsin
DaveRW wrote:
Nobody wears Thorogood Flyways? Waterproof, American-made, classic moc toe like Dad wore, and priced about right. I have had Danner Grouse hunters, Irish Setter Wingshooters and several others but the Thorogoods are the best I have found. I realize comfort is highly subjective but worth a look in my opinion.

Dave


Never head of these before. Looks like a decent boot, but I suspect the $300 price tag puts them into a category with lots of other excellent boots. I’ve gone to $225 but never spent 3 bills on a boot yet. Why do you think these are better than the Filsons or others mentioned on here at that price? I do like that they have wide widths. Of course Red Wing MN is just down the road from me so factory RW seconds are generally where I go first!


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 Post subject: Re: Upland boots
PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2021 9:52 am 
Field Grade

Joined: Mon Feb 15, 2021 10:13 pm
Posts: 93
Hal4son wrote:
nwcanoe wrote:
I ordered a pair of LL Bean upland boots, and they arrived yesterday. Initial reaction; they look good, not made in USA, but Beans backs them with their outstanding warranty. I will wear them around the place for a few days and see how they feel. If they don't work, back they go. The warranty and responses from this thread helped me with the decision. After I placed the order, I came across the Russell Co video. If the Beans don't work I think I will dig deep and order a pair of Russells. I have been advised to buy from Filsons, but they don't stand behind their products. Their warranty is for normal life and wear of product and they decide what is normal. Their sales people were really condescending and they don't make their boots anyway and the price is close to what Russells cost. I will let you know.


I'd like to hear the update. I've owned several pairs of Danner Acadia boots. However I've never gotten the life out of them that others claim. Waterproof and fit are primary factors that keep me going back for another pair.
https://www.danner.com/men/tactical/aca ... -200g.html

I've owned kangaroo boots before. They were good boots but they didn't fit me as well as the Danners. Half the price.
https://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/121863? ... yId=121863

Filson warranty sucks. I've owned multiple wool and tin cloth Filson garments including hats, chaps and coats. I have personal experience with multiple items that don't hold up to normal wear. Filson will not repair anything, will not back anything. Won't fix anything even if you are willing to pay. They are just down the road from me and have been in there to talk to them. They claim they have seamstresses working on site but they won't throw a stitch on anything once you've paid your money. Piss on Filson, I won't buy another piece from them.


Filson turned hipster. Filson is not half the man he used to be..., so to speak. Incredibly expensive for what they are. Pretty pictures, a name that had a great reputation, but no more. I own a thirty years old jacket they made custom for me. That was thirty years ago. They sold out to some Wall Street type and that was the end of a formerly prestigious name.


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 Post subject: Re: Upland boots
PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2021 10:34 am 
Presentation Grade
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Joined: Tue Apr 25, 2006 1:46 pm
Posts: 513
Location: MN.
Patently Obvious wrote:
DaveRW wrote:
Nobody wears Thorogood Flyways? Waterproof, American-made, classic moc toe like Dad wore, and priced about right. I have had Danner Grouse hunters, Irish Setter Wingshooters and several others but the Thorogoods are the best I have found. I realize comfort is highly subjective but worth a look in my opinion.

Dave


Never head of these before. Looks like a decent boot, but I suspect the $300 price tag puts them into a category with lots of other excellent boots. I’ve gone to $225 but never spent 3 bills on a boot yet. Why do you think these are better than the Filsons or others mentioned on here at that price? I do like that they have wide widths. Of course Red Wing MN is just down the road from me so factory RW seconds are generally where I go first!


Weinbrenner\Thorogood is in Wi. just saying :D And the Filson boots were actually made by Weinbrenner, they are the same boot you just pay more for the Filson name. Then Filson outsourced to some overseas company when they started circling the sewer drain. Few years ago they moved production back to the US, I think some place in Pa. this time.

Weinbrenner also made the original Gary Borger wading boot, best wading boot ever made. Mine are still going strong more than 30 years later. Weinbrenner\Thorogood makes some top of the line footwear.

I go up the road (instead of down the road) through Red Wing and cut over to Wi. to avoid the Cities when I hunt the tip of the Mn. Arrowhead for grouse every October. And Red Wing always has their annual tent sale going on. Never stopped because I am headed to kill birds and that is first and foremost on my mind. And already have enough Crispi boots to last me a lifetime. I do own a pair of Red Wing Heritage boots though and have worn out my share of Irish Setters. Along with the other brands mentioned. And of course my Russell's were made in Wi. Heck half or more of the workforce at Red Wing is from Wi.

I do cross over into Wi. for other reasons such as shoot at Emerald Whispering Ridge, Woods and Meadows, Medford and a few other places.


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 Post subject: Re: Upland boots
PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2021 11:36 am 
Field Grade

Joined: Fri Apr 09, 2021 1:55 pm
Posts: 22
Location: So Cal
I hunt the Rockies exclusively. I've worn Red Wing, Danner, Zamberlan, Vasque, and I'm sure others than I've forgotten. The most comfortable are waterproof Vasque breeze with a pair of mid-weight marino wool socks.

If I were to buy another pair of boots, I'd probably look at Danner Light.

Zamberlan are beautiful boots crafted in Italy. They're mid-calf boots. They're 100% waterproof and of exceptional quality leather. They're insulated. I have a tinge of buyer's remorse. They appear to have been made for Alps mountaineering, not Rocky Mountain big game hunting.

When I think of Italian shoes, I think of shoes for black tie affairs which I try to avoid. Zamberlan is excellent quality, but is the price premium justified? I paid at least half price for Vasque than I paid for Zamberlan, and I wear them most.

Now that I'm returning to upland hunting, my guess is I'll wear Vasque Breeze.

I do know that if your feet hurt, you won't be hunting.


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 Post subject: Re: Upland boots
PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2021 11:44 am 
Tournament Grade

Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2021 2:57 pm
Posts: 224
I’ve had my feet/ankles saved numerous times by Kennetrek and a pair of Zamberlins. At those moments, I’d pay triple the price.

Amazes me how folks will spend thousands on other gear/trips/etc., then bargain hunt for boots. My hunting/hiking boots are like my truck tires, I buy the best I can find. When you’re two or more days walk from anywhere, or even just 5 miles from the truck, my boots are far more important to me than my shotgun or rifle.

That being said, there’s so many different variables. Loose and rocky terrain has different requirements than a swamp or a flatland full of snakes and so on.


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 Post subject: Re: Upland boots
PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2021 12:32 pm 
Crown Grade
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Joined: Mon May 27, 2013 7:19 pm
Posts: 2026
Location: Indian Head Country Wisconsin
Cold Iron wrote:
Patently Obvious wrote:
DaveRW wrote:
Nobody wears Thorogood Flyways? Waterproof, American-made, classic moc toe like Dad wore, and priced about right. I have had Danner Grouse hunters, Irish Setter Wingshooters and several others but the Thorogoods are the best I have found. I realize comfort is highly subjective but worth a look in my opinion.

Dave


Never head of these before. Looks like a decent boot, but I suspect the $300 price tag puts them into a category with lots of other excellent boots. I’ve gone to $225 but never spent 3 bills on a boot yet. Why do you think these are better than the Filsons or others mentioned on here at that price? I do like that they have wide widths. Of course Red Wing MN is just down the road from me so factory RW seconds are generally where I go first!


Weinbrenner\Thorogood is in Wi. just saying :D And the Filson boots were actually made by Weinbrenner, they are the same boot you just pay more for the Filson name. Then Filson outsourced to some overseas company when they started circling the sewer drain. Few years ago they moved production back to the US, I think some place in Pa. this time.

Weinbrenner also made the original Gary Borger wading boot, best wading boot ever made. Mine are still going strong more than 30 years later. Weinbrenner\Thorogood makes some top of the line footwear.

I go up the road (instead of down the road) through Red Wing and cut over to Wi. to avoid the Cities when I hunt the tip of the Mn. Arrowhead for grouse every October. And Red Wing always has their annual tent sale going on. Never stopped because I am headed to kill birds and that is first and foremost on my mind. And already have enough Crispi boots to last me a lifetime. I do own a pair of Red Wing Heritage boots though and have worn out my share of Irish Setters. Along with the other brands mentioned. And of course my Russell's were made in Wi. Heck half or more of the workforce at Red Wing is from Wi.

I do cross over into Wi. for other reasons such as shoot at Emerald Whispering Ridge, Woods and Meadows, Medford and a few other places.


Well now I got to investigate this more! I’ve been to Russel in Berlin. So need to go see about Weinbrenner.


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 Post subject: Re: Upland boots
PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2021 5:21 pm 
Presentation Grade
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Joined: Tue Apr 25, 2006 1:46 pm
Posts: 513
Location: MN.
1911-A1 wrote:
I hunt the Rockies exclusively. I've worn Red Wing, Danner, Zamberlan, Vasque, and I'm sure others than I've forgotten. The most comfortable are waterproof Vasque breeze with a pair of mid-weight marino wool socks.

If I were to buy another pair of boots, I'd probably look at Danner Light.

Zamberlan are beautiful boots crafted in Italy. They're mid-calf boots. They're 100% waterproof and of exceptional quality leather. They're insulated. I have a tinge of buyer's remorse. They appear to have been made for Alps mountaineering, not Rocky Mountain big game hunting.

When I think of Italian shoes, I think of shoes for black tie affairs which I try to avoid. Zamberlan is excellent quality, but is the price premium justified? I paid at least half price for Vasque than I paid for Zamberlan, and I wear them most.

Now that I'm returning to upland hunting, my guess is I'll wear Vasque Breeze.

I do know that if your feet hurt, you won't be hunting.


Interesting view. For 20 years in the Navy my idea of getting dressed up was putting some polish on my steel toed Engineer boots, khaki belt and collar devices. When I retired and started work in Civland wore a suit for the first 20 years. No way was I going to wear those made in Italy or China pointy toed long clown shoes with a suit. My dress shoes are made in Wisconsin by Allen Edmonds. The most formal of them all is the Park Avenue captoe oxford which is formal enough for black tie events.

Image

And Presidents of the US wear them at inauguration. Well at least the conservative ones do.

Italy I think of the best boots made. Crispi, Zamberlan and Kennetrek as long as it is the ones they make in Italy yet. In the 80's and 90's that would also have included Vasque specifically the Sundowner. But my last pair of Vasque Sundowners had sole separation in less than 6 months. Was in a Red Wing Shoe store about 10 years ago and mentioned it to one of the salesmen. He said yeah when Red Wing moved Vasque production to China they had some QA issues at first. Too late for me, I will never own another pair of Vasque boots despite having worn them for more than 2 decades.

Crispi, Zamberlan and Kennetrek all 3 make many different models with different flexes in the soles. It is finding the right flex for your needs and boot that fits you best. Many sheep and elk hunters, especially archery hunters, in the Rockies have and are moving to Crispi. And upland hunters across the Country.

Flyingtargets! wrote:
I’ve had my feet/ankles saved numerous times by Kennetrek and a pair of Zamberlins. At those moments, I’d pay triple the price.

Amazes me how folks will spend thousands on other gear/trips/etc., then bargain hunt for boots. My hunting/hiking boots are like my truck tires, I buy the best I can find. When you’re two or more days walk from anywhere, or even just 5 miles from the truck, my boots are far more important to me than my shotgun or rifle.

That being said, there’s so many different variables. Loose and rocky terrain has different requirements than a swamp or a flatland full of snakes and so on.


Well said. Except you forgot Crispi {hs#

About 7 years ago stepped on a log while grouse hunting in the tip of the Mn. Arrowhead and rolled my ankle. Was wearing Meindl Perfekt hunters at the time. Was a long ways back to the truck and there were some times when I doubted was going to make it. No cell phone reception, nearest house more than 20 miles if not 30 miles away. Didn't have much choice but to make it back LOL.

It was the straw that broke the camel's back and I ended up working with Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine. Still am. In the process of finding more support discovered Crispi boots with Ankle Bone Support System, it works. Well enough that the Doc I am working with is now recommending them to other patients in the same situation as me. I made a comment to him about wishing they would had been available sooner in the US. He said if they were and I had been wearing them at the time then I wouldn't be sitting on a stool in his office right now....


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 Post subject: Re: Upland boots
PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2021 6:06 pm 
Limited Edition

Joined: Thu Sep 24, 2009 12:28 pm
Posts: 321
I went with the LL Bean upland boot. Fits me, and is comfortable all day. After a couple of years the sole wore down to almost smooth, so I re-soled them last fall for $80. Was it a good move? don't know. If they hold up for another three or four years it will be worth it. Unfortunately, the stitching around the toe box which was wrapped in leather has become partially exposed as the wrapping has worn away. May have to visit the cobbler to see what can be done. Interestingly, the guides that I hunted with last year in Montana all wear Muck style boots. They claim them to be super comfy, not hot and waterproof. Wonder if anyone else has any experience with this type of boot for upland hunting.

A note on Filson; a few years ago I was given a pair of shooting gloves 'made' by Filson. Tag said lifetime gaurantee. They wore out faster than I thought reasonable, so I went in to the main store in Seattle. A very arrogant young guy tried to help me. First I had to go through a long winded monologue of how superior their products are and gauranteed as well. I showed him the gloves, and asked for repair or replacement. He was speechless, turned me over to his manager. The infuriating response was 'Yes we gaurantee for the life of the product and we determine what that life span is. Sorry this is beyond the life span, but we would be happy to help you select a new pair of gloves' I really did'nt expect anything from them, but this reply set my teeth on edge. I told my family NEVER buy anything from this company ever!! And I have not been there since.


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 Post subject: Re: Upland boots
PostPosted: Sat Apr 17, 2021 12:19 am 
Field Grade

Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2016 11:22 pm
Posts: 20
In the last two years I have hunted in Crispi and Lowa boots. There are a few others I would like to try, namely Scarpa, Salewa and Hanwag. Some of these are not marketed towards hunting, but would function well in steep chukar country.

My favorites by far have been Lowa. I hunt in the Tibet GTX when in the steep and rocky terrain, and there are a slew of others that are good for more gentle upland terrain, such as the Renegade GTX or Rangers. Lowa makes great stuff. After some hard elk hunting, my feet and lower extremities felt great when they came out of the Lowa boots.

Crispi has a few models that are good, and a few that I wouldn’t touch. Avoid the Summits and the Thors. Idaho and Nevada models are good. I’ve wanted to try some others but haven’t been able to.

Both Lowa and Crispi are far more refined than the Kennetrek, IMO.

Pay attention to the sole flex. Lowa lists the stiffness rating and shank hardness on their website, some others do as well. I prefer stiff when hills are involved.

Ultimately you’ll find that some models or brands fit your foot shape better. Crispi tapered told hard into my pinky toe. Lowa models all fit me great. More narrow/wide choices with Lowa as well.


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 Post subject: Re: Upland boots
PostPosted: Sat Apr 17, 2021 3:27 pm 
Limited Edition

Joined: Fri Sep 22, 2006 10:11 pm
Posts: 333
Location: Soldotna, Alaska
My problem with boots now days are finding a pair wide enough to fit my feet. I need EE or EEEE width and damn few boot makers make these widths anymore.


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 Post subject: Re: Upland boots
PostPosted: Sat Apr 17, 2021 6:21 pm 
Presentation Grade
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Joined: Tue Apr 25, 2006 1:46 pm
Posts: 513
Location: MN.
SteveID wrote:
Crispi has a few models that are good, and a few that I wouldn’t touch. Avoid the Summits and the Thors. Idaho and Nevada models are good. I’ve wanted to try some others but haven’t been able to.

Both Lowa and Crispi are far more refined than the Kennetrek, IMO.

Pay attention to the sole flex. Lowa lists the stiffness rating and shank hardness on their website, some others do as well. I prefer stiff when hills are involved.

Ultimately you’ll find that some models or brands fit your foot shape better. Crispi tapered told hard into my pinky toe. Lowa models all fit me great. More narrow/wide choices with Lowa as well.


The Crispi Summit and Thror do not have Ankle Bone Support System. I will not buy a boot without A.B.S.S. defeats the whole purpose of the Crispi boot and might as well get a pair of Lowa :twisted:

Our feet are obviously different so not sure I can give a fair comparison across the different models that I own but will try, you might be able to glean something from it. I get no toe rub with any Crispi and they fit me better than Lowa, and give me better support. They are all I wear on my feet everyday of the year including inside. About the only way I can even walk most days.

With bone on bone grinding in my left ankle and now my right one also I am a lot more sensitive to subtle things than I used to be. 10 years ago that was not the case and of course does not apply to everyone.

Nevada, Guide and Hunter GTX are basically the same boot as far as fit, difference is height. The 2" taller height of the Guide over the Nevada is huge for additional support. Going up 2" more to the Hunter over the Guide not so much or even any. But are good for hunting woodcock areas and edges of bogs where wet. The Hunter is a flex 4 so a bit stiffer than the Nevada and Guide. I only wear the Hunter GTX hunting and after 6 hunting seasons they are not as stiff a flex as they were new, but still fairly stiff which I like. All 3 have a fair amount of volume. For my foot.

The Idaho and little brother Wyoming also are the same in fit to each other. They fit my foot more snugly and reminds me of the Danner Grouse boot. Supposedly they have the largest toe box of any Crispi boot but can't really tell as I have plenty of room in all of them. I like the snug fit along the sides of my feet and of course you can adjust it with the laces. They are cooler than the other 3 and my go to summer boots. Both are Flex 3 which I consider the minimum I require. For anything.

Ortho Doc told me after all the imaging was in that I would never be able to sidehill again. My first thought was hold my beer and watch this... I live in a ravine so to do anything in the yard need to be able to sidehill. Wanted a boot to keep in the garage instead of cleaning mud, dog poo etc. off them before coming inside. First attempt was the Colorado with a flex of 4. While it is stiffer than a 3 the lower height and synthetic lightweight material doesn't give the overall support I was looking for. I use them for going to town and when walking on pavement. They are also a cooler summer use boot although I have worn them in below zero weather with no problem.

Next attempt at a yard boot was the Briksdal. They are not a lace to toe but more of a hybrid and you can totally adjust your fit with the laces. They are listed as 9" so thought perfect, in between the 8" and 10" boots however in reality that extra height is collar padding. So only provide the height support of an 8" boot. They work well for me though. I have the 4 Flex and they do sell a 5 Flex Briksdal SF which is the stiffest boot they make. I would not be afraid to try the 5 Flex if you were looking for a really stiff boot with a lot of support.

Of course they have recently changed the design on many of the boots starting this year so not sure what has stayed the same. But learned a long time ago that when you find something that works you better get more than one of them. Because they will discontinue or change it.

Hope that helps.




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