ShotGunWorld Shotguns

It is currently Thu Oct 29, 2020 3:53 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 10 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: doing your own pelt
PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 8:41 pm 
Utility Grade
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jan 24, 2010 8:33 pm
Posts: 7
Location: Arkansas
any advice?




Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: doing your own pelt
PostPosted: Tue Mar 02, 2010 1:22 pm 
Tournament Grade
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 07, 2010 11:41 pm
Posts: 200
Location: cleveland, ohio
when your skinning the animal, try to leave as much of the fat on the animal's meat/ bone as possible: you also want to rinse the blood out of the pelt as soon as possible after you have shot it. This should help prevent staining. after the pelt is completely removed from the animal, i cover the inside with just iodized salt, mixed with some sugar. This helps dry out any left over fat/ liquid that was on the pelt. i change the salt/ sugar mix (50-50 ratio) every 4 days. after about 15 days your good to go.

_________________
H&K SBE
Stoeger M3000


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: doing your own pelt
PostPosted: Sat Mar 13, 2010 10:17 am 
Field Grade

Joined: Mon Jan 18, 2010 6:00 pm
Posts: 46
what do you do after 15 days? and do you freeze while salting or just leave in a dry cool area?

_________________
_______________________
I'll keep my freedom, guns and money. You can have the change.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: doing your own pelt
PostPosted: Mon Mar 15, 2010 12:12 pm 
Crown Grade
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2005 4:16 pm
Posts: 4643
Location: Long Island, NY
The very first thing you have to do after you get the pelt off the animal is to flesh it. That means that you need to get every bit of flesh, fat and membrain off the skin, every bit. This is best done with a fleshing bench and a fleshing knife, but you can do it with regular skinning knife and a relatively flat surface. Just take your time and get everything off.

Once the pelt has been fleshed, coat the skin side liberally with a fine grade of rock salt. Using regular iodized table salt will cause the salt to crust over and be a real mess (I don't know where the sugar comes in, I've never heard of anything like it). Roll the skin flesh side in for a day or two and then change the salt. After about a week, clean off all the salt, and thouroughly wash the pelt. At this point, you need to decide which of the many tanning processes you want to use. Purchasing a commercial tanning kit from a taxidermy supply house is probably the easiest. but be aware that it involves a pretty good deal of work to get the skin nice and soft. If you decide to use a chemical process, there are several methods available, but they all still involve a lot of labor.

Frank

_________________
Μολών λαβέ


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: doing your own pelt
PostPosted: Mon Mar 15, 2010 8:20 pm 
Tournament Grade
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 07, 2010 11:41 pm
Posts: 200
Location: cleveland, ohio
newenglandhunter wrote:
what do you do after 15 days? and do you freeze while salting or just leave in a dry cool area?



after fifteen days the pelt should be dried enough, and should be good just to sit the way it is: i currently have a fox pelt hanging in my dorm room which i pelted over 3 months ago: you'll never catch a nasty scent off of it or anything. the sugar and salt dry out all of the fat, which ensures nothing is left on it...

as suggested by the poster above, shaving any fats or tissues you can see on the pelt before applying the salt-sugar mixture will help in the process.

_________________
H&K SBE
Stoeger M3000


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: doing your own pelt
PostPosted: Mon Mar 15, 2010 8:23 pm 
Tournament Grade
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 07, 2010 11:41 pm
Posts: 200
Location: cleveland, ohio
Frank Lopez wrote:
(I don't know where the sugar comes in, I've never heard of anything like it).
Frank


i was told my a local taxidermist that putting sugar on it when mixed with the iodized salt help to soften the inside of the pelt, as well as helping keep the salt from "crusting over" as you put it: this helps in not having to do any tanning process or chemical treatment process... this is the one big advantage of using the salt-sugar mixture....

_________________
H&K SBE
Stoeger M3000


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: doing your own pelt
PostPosted: Wed Mar 17, 2010 10:10 am 
Crown Grade
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2005 4:16 pm
Posts: 4643
Location: Long Island, NY
tript2009 wrote:
Frank Lopez wrote:
(I don't know where the sugar comes in, I've never heard of anything like it).
Frank


i was told my a local taxidermist that putting sugar on it when mixed with the iodized salt help to soften the inside of the pelt, as well as helping keep the salt from "crusting over" as you put it: this helps in not having to do any tanning process or chemical treatment process... this is the one big advantage of using the salt-sugar mixture....


Perhaps it works, and perhaps ist doesn't! By everything I know about the tanning process, it shouldn't have any bearing on it. The process that you describe does not tan anything. It simply dries the pelt and gets it ready for tanning. And while the pelt will remain in that condition for some time, it will eventually fail. The hair will begin to slip and the skin itself rot. This process may take a couple of years, but it WILL happen. Essentially what you've done is to create raw hide with the hair on.

The tanning process involves the treating and breaking down of the fibers and membranes in the skn itself. There are several different chemical processes that are used to treat th e skin. After the skin has been treated, the work starts. The skin must be continually stretched as it dries, a process that can take several hours, depending on the size of the pelt. Modering tanneries use different variations and mechines to do this, but the basic process it the same. Home tanning is basically a hand stretching process. After you've done a couple, you'll realize that having the pelt commercially tanned is probably a good investment. :wink:

Frank

_________________
Μολών λαβέ


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: doing your own pelt
PostPosted: Wed Mar 17, 2010 10:29 am 
Tournament Grade
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 23, 2010 7:12 am
Posts: 171
Location: Central Ohio
I do "Brain Tanning". Run a Google search and Youtube.
They are not kidding about the work....

_________________
I just like to see how far the clays fly....

NEF Pardner Pump
Mossberg 500
Savage Milano
Beretta Xtrema


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: doing your own pelt
PostPosted: Wed Mar 17, 2010 10:52 am 
*Proud to be a*
*Proud to be a*
User avatar

Joined: Fri Mar 03, 2006 8:19 am
Posts: 1167
Location: Foggybog, WI
I've tanned a few and agree with Mr. Lopez--I now flesh and dry pelts I want tanned, then send them to Moyle Mink and Tannery. Softening tanned hides is a long, laborious task. For about $20, Moyle will return a pelt far superior to what you can do at home.

_________________
Ephesians 2:8-9


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: doing your own pelt
PostPosted: Mon Dec 06, 2010 9:07 pm 
*Proud to be a*
*Proud to be a*
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 25, 2010 11:07 am
Posts: 3066
Location: Florida
I don't disagree that the salt/sugar method is not tanning, but I have a fox skin that is over 30 years old that was only fleshed and dried using salt and it hasn't lost any hair to speak of.

I fleshed it, salted it, and then oiled it. It's pretty stiff and always has been but it still looks good as they day I brought it home.

I was 28 then and now I'm 63... however long that is..hell that's 35 years.



_________________
When it's over I want to hit the ground like a spent shell.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 10 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Registered users: bigeejakes, Bing [Bot], George Z, Google [Bot], Google Adsense [Bot], Google Feedfetcher, KRIEGHOFFK80, Majestic-12 [Bot], May, rickeroo, superskeet, Virginian


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group    - DMCA Notice