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 Post subject: 1946 Remington Sportsman M11 is a goodern
PostPosted: Sun Jan 24, 2021 4:44 am 
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Today I took my three shot version of the Remington Model 11, a Sportsman made in September 1946, out shooting with my friends. It appears to be a brand new 75 year old gun somebody added a Lyman Cutts choke and vented pad to, and put away in a time capsule. It needed the magazine tube oiled, and then never missed a beat.

https://imgur.com/gallery/jccIP4j

Image

The Sportsman was it’s very own model, based on the Model 11 but with a unique magazine tube and unique for-end making it a two shells in the magazine plus one in the chamber shotgun. My postwar gun has a big, beefy checkered walnut stock with completely modern dimensions, a 24” barrel to a 4” Cutts cage, making the effective barrel length from 29” to 31” long depending on the choke screwed on. It weighs 8 pounds 12 ounces and balances exactly where you grip it in the middle under the bolt handle.

Under the for-end is a paper showing the same friction ring settings as an Auto Five plus for a Cutts the bronze friction piece goes to the rear and the slide ring up front. That’s why it needed oil on magazine tube for the light setting, and evidence a Cutts really did reduce recoil. My barrel is marked Full, so the pristine Cutts must have been added later. But along with the Pachy vented pad (still soft) it looks like it grew there on it’s own. Those were installed by a pair of extremely skilled hands.

With a steel .755 “General Purpose” choke this gun is a skeet bird breaking machine and recoil free. I bought on eBay what I thought was a Spreader tube that actually a tube called the General Purpose .755 Other 12 gauge tubes available in aluminum or steel were the Modified .725, the Full .705, the Long Range #3 .690, and the Long Range #2 .680. The gun came with a steel .680 Long Range #2 and I have an aluminum Modified .725 for it in my stuff somewhere.

A Remington Model 11 is a poor American sister to the Belgian Browning Auto Five, but by the end of production Remington had the Sportsman model refined into truly a sportsman’s dream gun.

I’d love to see an American Browning in pristine condition from the late 40s.

It’s hard to see how Remington could have made a fancier version. My gun has soft rust blue, flawless fine line hand checkering, and finished out to where it just glows and gleams.

It’s not as nice as my 1952 Belgian Browning Auto Five Light 12, but it’s very close, and with the Cutts my Sportsman will shoot steel shot, if I’m ever cornered by a do gooder and forced to.

My 1952 Auto Five has a Polychoke, so it’s future proof too.

But our fathers and grandfathers were not in the slightest less well armed with their semi automatic shotguns than us, until the Model 48 came out.

After the Model 48 a quarter century later Winchester tried making a best quality American shotgun like the original Remington Sportsman with their Super X Model One, but people wouldn’t pay for best quality semi auto shotguns.



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 Post subject: Re: 1946 Remington Sportsman M11 is a goodern
PostPosted: Sun Jan 24, 2021 10:05 am 
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Every gun you own seems to be a “goodern”! How many times have we seen this post?

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 Post subject: Re: 1946 Remington Sportsman M11 is a goodern
PostPosted: Sun Jan 24, 2021 10:17 am 
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I have a 16ga M11 that I traded for at a pawn shop in St Joseph, Mo thirty years ago that quickly became my favorite hunting and sporting clays gun. It has a poly-choke that made it easy to change cokes when needed on the sporting clay course or when going from open field walks for pheasant to going in tight cover.
I mostly use my double guns these days because I got tired of chasing down my empty hulls.

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 Post subject: Re: 1946 Remington Sportsman M11 is a goodern
PostPosted: Sun Jan 24, 2021 10:36 am 
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good report on the old M11, enjoyed it.


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 Post subject: Re: 1946 Remington Sportsman M11 is a goodern
PostPosted: Sun Jan 24, 2021 10:48 am 
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casonet wrote:
Every gun you own seems to be a “goodern”! How many times have we seen this post?


The man never met a shotgun he didn't like.

I once had a Remington 877 shotgun in my shop -- an embarrassment of a gun if there ever was one. SX1 bought it from me just because he wanted to experience how bad a gun it was. He brought it out to the skeet range and shot a round with it. The whole time he was laughing uproariously and gleefully describing every cheesy plastic detail Remington put into that gun.

That gun was definitely not a "goodern," but he enjoyed it just the same. I've never seen that gun since. Wonder what he did with it.


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 Post subject: Re: 1946 Remington Sportsman M11 is a goodern
PostPosted: Sun Jan 24, 2021 11:17 am 
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Dunno, but he is a laugh a minute

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 Post subject: Re: 1946 Remington Sportsman M11 is a goodern
PostPosted: Sun Jan 24, 2021 1:01 pm 
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Bladeswitcher wrote:
casonet wrote:
Every gun you own seems to be a “goodern”! How many times have we seen this post?


The man never met a shotgun he didn't like.

I once had a Remington 877 shotgun in my shop -- an embarrassment of a gun if there ever was one. SX1 bought it from me just because he wanted to experience how bad a gun it was. He brought it out to the skeet range and shot a round with it. The whole time he was laughing uproariously and gleefully describing every cheesy plastic detail Remington put into that gun.

That gun was definitely not a "goodern," but he enjoyed it just the same. I've never seen that gun since. Wonder what he did with it.


That 877 was the second worst Remington shotgun I’ve ever had the pleasure of shooting.

Likely it was designed by the engineers of the Winchester Model 1200/1400 after they worked for the booze companies designing honey and cinnamon flavored whiskey for the younger set, at the twilight of their evil careers. It was beyond horrible to fondle, handle and and shoot. Only a kid given one for Christmas could have loved it.

The stock and receiver were a one piece molding of recycled two liter Pepsi bottles dyed people shooter black, with a short section of small diameter sewer pipe for a barrel. Of course it shot 3 1/2” sky blaster shells. The gun was made to compete with a similar Benelli plastic gun, without the prestige of owning the worst Bennili ever made.

But the 877 was not the worst Remington shotgun I’ve ever seen. It did work and go bang every time, and was made at Ilion.

Our friend Steve used to own the worst Remington ever made. It was a Chinese made copy of a Remington 870, even worse than my 877. As I recall Remington was so ashamed of the Chinese made 870s they stamped them as H&R 1871 imports.

I think I traded or sold my 877 to Steve.

Unlike our friend Adam, when you peddle a gun to Steve he keeps it, and never wants to sell it back. Like the Mickie on the commercial, he’ll shoot anything.

But Steve also owns some of the finest, most delicious guns I’ve ever seen.

The 877 and Chinese 870 aren’t among them.

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 Post subject: Re: 1946 Remington Sportsman M11 is a goodern
PostPosted: Sun Jan 24, 2021 2:10 pm 
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casonet wrote:
Every gun you own seems to be a “goodern”! How many times have we seen this post?


My Sportsman was born in Ilion in September 1946, which is a month most memorable to me.

Sometime in early September 1946, my father heard from his buddy Malvern there was a waitress over at Carson’s Corner in Hickory County worth seeing. Daddy was already engaged but asked Malvern if there was a juke box there, and Malvern said there was.

Daddy made a two dollar bet with Malvern that a new song on the juke box had lyrics If I must tow the mark, then you must walk the line. Malvern thought it was if I must walk the line, then you must tow the mark.

It’s about 14 miles from our farm to Carson’s Corner. Daddy polished up his 1940 Ford two door, slicked his hair back and put on a pair of ironed khaki pants and ironed white shirt his Mama had pressed for him, and a tie and sport coat, and headed out with Malvern to Hickory County.

Mama said the place was so busy she didn’t see them come in, but when she came to Daddy’s table he announced his name, introduced his friend Malvern, and said they were from Humansville and had came there to settle a bet.

He handed her a quarter and asked if she’d play the new Eddie Arnold song about towing the mark, or walking the line, so they could know which line came first. The other five songs, she could pick whatever she wanted.

Mama said her boss lady smiled at her as she stood at the juke box and winked, because she was dancing in place, to the first song she selected.

IF I MUST WALK THE LINE

Eddie Arnold September 1946



Mama asked her boss lady if she knew that Humansville boy, and she said she ought to put on an asbestos apron and go get to known him better, she’d wait the tables herself.

Malvern was dating my mother’s roommate at college named Jean.

It was something in common my folks had to talk about at the corner table in Carson’s Corner in September 1946, besides dance to those old Western swing songs coming out of the jukebox.

Mama wrote two dear John letters that evening, one to her millionaire brother of J.C Nichols boyfriend and another to the All Around Cowboy of 1946, whose parents owned two thousand acres by Flemington, and never again was she the pretty girl singer at the J Bar H Rodeo.

Daddy broke up with his fiancé, who a lifetime later came to my mother’s sale when I had to put Mama in a nursing home in 2009. She picked me out of the sale crowd, announced who she was, then a week later sent me a stack of photographs of her and Daddy in 1946.

Even at almost 90, she was still well over six feet tall and beautiful.

I wasn’t born until 1958.

But the process began, in September 1946.

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 Post subject: Re: 1946 Remington Sportsman M11 is a goodern
PostPosted: Sun Jan 24, 2021 3:03 pm 
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Nice story, SX1, and you certainly know how to spin a good one. Pretty good old country tune too.


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 Post subject: Re: 1946 Remington Sportsman M11 is a goodern
PostPosted: Sun Jan 24, 2021 4:34 pm 
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lossking wrote:
Nice story, SX1, and you certainly know how to spin a good one. Pretty good old country tune too.


The stories I tell are true, sometimes with small details omitted to protect the guilty.

Malvern wound up marrying Jean, but Malvern had a taste for the barleycorn that Jean could neither break him of or tolerate.

Thirty years later Jean was living in Fristoe, with another alcoholic named Frank. Mama and I would visit them quite often.

My father only touched liquor twice after he gave the pretty waitress a quarter to play the jukebox in September 1946, and she never let him forget it, or forget his giraffe girlfriend, or that she could have been the wife of a millionaire, or a man with miles of farmland, or a brigadier general, had she pleased. Then after her tirade she’d cry and beg forgiveness which always was granted. Mother’s beauty and grace was leavened with a murderous temper, that Daddy said she could not help herself from having from time to time.

My father had no temper at all, and whistled as he milked his cows or drove down the road, waving to every one we met. He whistled many tunes, but one in particular I remember.

CHARLIE’S SHOES

Billy Walker version



Carl and Sivella Williamson owned Carson’s Corner, near Dooley Bend, and sold it and moved near Urbana. They lived almost forever, and Mama never forgot the kindness they showed her, when she was a young girl wanting her first job, as a waitress.

When Mama had her last heart attack in July 2009 she finally couldn’t live on her own, and against everything I’d ever promised I had to put her in a nursing home. She lived to late October of the next year, slowly dying of congestive heart failure.

Sometimes she’d start talking to me about how me and Malvern and Jean went out driving in my 1940 Ford, and someplace we’d been and what we’d seen.

I’d sit and listen until she’d realize it wasn’t him, but his only son who had his middle name.

She’d smile then, and I’d ask if she wanted to hear some old song, and wheel her down to the visitor’s room to play all those songs, I learned from her.

MANY TEARS AGO

Eddie Arnold 1945



I’d like to think they are all driving around somewhere in that 1940 Ford, in a land we cannot see from here.

But once upon a time, they surely did.

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 Post subject: Re: 1946 Remington Sportsman M11 is a goodern
PostPosted: Sun Jan 24, 2021 5:06 pm 
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SuperX got me sidetracked with his stories. I forgot what I was going to say. Oh yeah. I inherited a Model 11 Sportsman 16 gauge from my uncle. Modified fixed choke. If remember correctly it was manufactured in 1952. That gun has shot ducks and geese on Slim Island and backwaters of the Ohio River and pheasants in Iowa and Indiana. I haven’t hunted with it but have shot a few rounds of skeet. Nice old gun with a neat history.


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 Post subject: Re: 1946 Remington Sportsman M11 is a goodern
PostPosted: Sun Jan 24, 2021 5:51 pm 
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winmod21 wrote:
SuperX got me sidetracked with his stories. I forgot what I was going to say. Oh yeah. I inherited a Model 11 Sportsman 16 gauge from my uncle. Modified fixed choke. If remember correctly it was manufactured in 1952. That gun has shot ducks and geese on Slim Island and backwaters of the Ohio River and pheasants in Iowa and Indiana. I haven’t hunted with it but have shot a few rounds of skeet. Nice old gun with a neat history.


Maybe there were parts clean up guns, but Remington claimed the last Model 11 in all gauges (and Sportsman version) were made in 1947.

https://www.remington.com/firearm-history/model-11

In all modern history, the five years from the end of World War Two until the beginning of the Korean War in the summer of 1950 were the most prosperous and happy time in our history.

Daddy and his friends would talk about how you could load up enough cows in a pickup truck to pay for a brand new one.

Farmers bought airplanes so much my grandfather said the day would come that airplanes would carry away cattle to market.

Daddy had to postpone buying a new car until they bought a new 1950 Ford in late 1949.

Instead he got married in 1947, after he’d bought a new little house in Humansville for $1,800 cash so they’d not have to live with his mother, who asked him in front of my mother why he wanted that skinny little river rat when he could have had Janice Tillery for the asking.

My grandfather shooed her back inside to fix supper while he went to the barn and gave Mama a nice mare and saddle. She never forgot that, to the day she died.

In 1948 Daddy bought and paid for an 80 acre farm for another $1,800 cash next to the home place.

Then two new 8N Ford tractors for him and his farm hand to farm it with along with the rest of the ground. Those my mother paid for from her schoolteacher check, which he sometimes was reminded of years later.

But the 1940 Ford was traded in and they drove home in a new black 1950, the day the tractors were paid for in late 1949. The difference was a thousand dollars cash.

Living had to have been sweet, in between VJ Day and Korea.

And the popular music was Western swing, or Country and Western. Hank Williams (and Lefty) put an end to it.

But some of us still love Moon Mullican, although we weren’t born when he had his last number one hit.

I’LL SAIL MY SHIP ALONE

Moon Mullican 1950


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Last edited by SuperXOne on Sun Jan 24, 2021 6:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: 1946 Remington Sportsman M11 is a goodern
PostPosted: Sun Jan 24, 2021 6:17 pm 
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My 1947 Sportsman was found in a closet in the kitchen of my in-laws place. Four daughters grew up there and no one ever knew there was a shotgun in the back of the closet, right behind the bean cans.

No one knew of my father in law ever shooting a gun but they found a box for a Colt pistol in the bedroom closet. No idea where the gun was.

We found a Winchester 62 in the basement, in a corner where all the grandkids played, along with a box of shells. No one ever knew that rifle was there either.

They built the house in the early 1960s and we cleaned it out in 2010.

The shotgun looked like it could have been unfired, the rifle not so much.

Yeah, it was a job cleaning that house out.


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 Post subject: Re: 1946 Remington Sportsman M11 is a goodern
PostPosted: Sun Jan 24, 2021 6:26 pm 
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McFarmer wrote:
My 1947 Sportsman was found in a closet in the kitchen of my in-laws place. Four daughters grew up there and no one ever knew there was a shotgun in the back of the closet, right behind the bean cans.

No one knew of my father in law ever shooting a gun but they found a box for a Colt pistol in the bedroom closet. No idea where the gun was.

We found a Winchester 62 in the basement, in a corner where all the grandkids played, along with a box of shells. No one ever knew that rifle was there either.

They built the house in the early 1960s and we cleaned it out in 2010.

The shotgun looked like it could have been unfired, the rifle not so much.

Yeah, it was a job cleaning that house out.


My old Korean War vet neighbor, now gone home, graduated high school in 1948.

His first job was building a new golf course, where he was paid a dollar an hour.

Ten years earlier his father worked for a dollar a day as a farm hand, when there was work.

Your 1947 Sportsman was likely bought on a whim.

Sort of like we’d buy a television, or some other electronic gadget.

And all through it, Tommy Duncan sang, while Bob Wills hollered Aahhhh Haaa.

FADED LOVE 1950

Bob Wills and his Texas Playboys


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 Post subject: Re: 1946 Remington Sportsman M11 is a goodern
PostPosted: Mon Jan 25, 2021 1:39 pm 
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This might be the best thread I've read on here.


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 Post subject: Re: 1946 Remington Sportsman M11 is a goodern
PostPosted: Mon Jan 25, 2021 9:09 pm 
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Super,
Always enjoy reading your post.


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 Post subject: Re: 1946 Remington Sportsman M11 is a goodern
PostPosted: Mon Jan 25, 2021 11:46 pm 
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It is too bad the outdoor magazines, Field and Stream, and Outdoor life are gone.
SuperXone could write for them, if they still published. Kids all over the country
would read about the gooderns, and Elmer Keith 44 guns. Along with it they
could hear the romance stories, finding the rifle behind the beans and all other
stuff to stir the imagination.

I miss those old magazines, but we still have SuperXone.


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 Post subject: Re: 1946 Remington Sportsman M11 is a goodern
PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2021 6:57 pm 
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SuperXOne wrote:
winmod21 wrote:
SuperX got me sidetracked with his stories. I forgot what I was going to say. Oh yeah. I inherited a Model 11 Sportsman 16 gauge from my uncle. Modified fixed choke. If remember correctly it was manufactured in 1952. That gun has shot ducks and geese on Slim Island and backwaters of the Ohio River and pheasants in Iowa and Indiana. I haven’t hunted with it but have shot a few rounds of skeet. Nice old gun with a neat history.


Maybe there were parts clean up guns, but Remington claimed the last Model 11 in all gauges (and Sportsman version) were made in 1947.

https://www.remington.com/firearm-history/model-11

You forced me to recheck the manufacture date on my uncle’s Model 11. It had “RSS”
on the barrel which means it was built in November, 1947. And yes it’s a goodern!


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 Post subject: Re: 1946 Remington Sportsman M11 is a goodern
PostPosted: Thu Jan 28, 2021 10:07 am 
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In 1944 hillbilly music star Jenny Lou Carson wrote and recorded Jealous Heart, which for a female country artist was probably the biggest hit for pretty girl singers until Kitty Wells recorded It Wasn’t God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels in 1952.

My mother said she auditioned for KWT0 in 1946, after having been the girl singer at the J BAR H rodeo.

She fixed her hair, put on her best dress, tallest high heel shoes, and took her guitar to the radio station. The manager (likely Red Foley) had her sing and play Jealous Heart.

He then said to her, let’s hear you yodel.

She blushed and said she couldn’t yodel very well at all.

The manager hemmed and hawed, then said little miss you are beyond pretty enough, and you sing well enough, but I’m looking for somebody that can yodel like Patsy Montana, too. Western music is a big thing today.

Twenty years later, Daddy would come in from the milk barn, and ask Mama to get her guitar and sing Jealous Heart, which she always was quick to do.

Then he’d say oh honey, I’m so lucky you can’t yodel I thank the Lord everyday.

To this very day, every young girl that has dreams of being a country star learns Jealous Heart, right after It Wasn’t God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels.

JEALOUS HEART

an aspiring young girl singer



Marie Osmond version


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 Post subject: Re: 1946 Remington Sportsman M11 is a goodern
PostPosted: Thu Jan 28, 2021 12:22 pm 
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Don't know what that has to do with the Model 11, but it's a good tune. Janey Kirk's rendition is better, hands down.




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