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 Post subject: Musgrave Beretta Booklet
PostPosted: Fri May 22, 2015 10:20 am 
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Joined: Fri May 09, 2014 8:10 am
Posts: 15
Hi All here is a few pics of an old Musgrave Beretta Shotgun booklet
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These came out in South Africa. Hope you guys enjoy!




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 Post subject: Re: Musgrave Beretta Booklet
PostPosted: Fri May 22, 2015 7:11 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 5:46 pm
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Location: Richmond, VA
Thank you for posting that. I found it fascinating. I am interested in everything related to the history of the Beretta 300-series semiautomatic shotguns, and the connection with Musgrave is a part of that. I already have an A300 SF with Musgrave barrel.

cpureaper, are you from South Africa?

Some of the readers in the USA may not be familiar with Musgrave and Armscor, so I will review what little I know (or think I know). cpureaper, please correct me and provide additional info if possible.

There appear to be two completely separate companies that use the name of Armscor. The one that operates in the USA and is affiliated with Rock Island Armory is apparently not related in any way to the South African Armscor.

The "other" Armscor is the trade name of Armaments Corporation of South Africa SOC Ltd. It is the government-owned supplier of national defense systems.

Musgrave originally was a privately-owned South African company that specialized in producing high-power rifles for hunting and target use. It became well-known world-wide for the accuracy and strength of its rifles, many of which were based on European military bolt action designs. For some years, Musgrave was owned by Armscor. The Musgrave name and function eventually ceased to exist as part of Armscor, but in recent years the name was revived by new owners.

I don't see a date on the booklet which cpureaper has provided for us, but I would guess it dates from the 1970's. Apparently at that time Musgrave (Armscor) collaborated with Beretta to provide a line of shotguns to compliment the Musgrave rifles. An article in Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musgrave_rifle claims that the Musgrave shotguns were based on Beretta models, with some components supplied by Musgrave. It says the semiautomatic (my own special interest) was essentially a Beretta A300 with a barrel made by Musgrave. (Remember, nothing on Wikipedia can be taken as completely correct beyond question.)

I would welcome additional comments and corrections.

_________________
My book on Beretta 391 Disassembly is no longer available.
My pen name is Irish, pronounced SHAY-mus oh-KOSH-eh-deh.


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 Post subject: Re: Musgrave Beretta Booklet
PostPosted: Sat May 23, 2015 5:46 am 
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Joined: Fri May 09, 2014 8:10 am
Posts: 15
Hi Yes I am from South Africa

I own both the Trap and Skeet guns as shown in those pictures. Both were made in South Africa. From my understanding during the "apartheid" (arms embargo) era we where not able to buy any arms from any country that was against that.

So with my understanding and please correct me if I am wrong
The guns were shipped to South Africa in pieces ie, barrel the mono block the receiver and the rest was made here.
So the parts where machined here and assembled and then sold in our market.

Musgrave was a small factory that was privately owned then became part of armscor.
Please have a look here:

The website of Safari Action Shooting has got his interesting article on Musgrave.
Musgrave, the former state owned South African sporting rifle manufacturer had its origins in private enterprise. The founder was the well-known late target champion, a president of Bloemfontein - Benjamin (Ben) Musgrave (1900 - 1987).
Ben Musgrave (snr) started participating seriously in large calibre target shooting during 1933. His then service rifle was the Lee Enfield in 303 British calibre. ‘Uncle Ben’, as he was generally known, in due course started experimenting with the accuracy of his rifle as a hobby. These experiments were very successful and the South African target shooting fraternity flocked around Ben Musgrave to re-accurize their rifles in his spare time. This situation continued for approximately 27 years until 1950 when the demand for Musgrave’s services become so great that he could not handle it alone anymore. He canvassed the assistance of his son Trevor, which at that stage was an apprentice at Escom in Vereeniging.
During 1952 Musgrave was awarded Springbok (then RSA National) colours and then made the South African target shooting team chosen to participate in International competitions in the United Kingdom. During the competition he was introduced by Arthur Ilsley of Birmingham to the barrel manufacturer WD Lain who was about to retire. Lain agreed to train Trevor in the United Kingdom for Musgrave in the use of the rifling machine he used, with the intention of selling the machine thereafter to the Musgraves.
Trevor completed his training and in early 1953 the machine was brought to South Africa. Musgrave moved to Douglas Valley and resigned from the South African Railways and Harbours were he had been employed until then. The building on the property was modified to become the workshop and barrel manufacturing started in all seriousness. Musgrave’s success in the field of target shooting rifles continued and after six years another son, Benny Musgrave jnr. also joined his father and brother.
During 1969 Armscor approached the Musgraves with the idea to establish an infra structure for the manufacturing of commercial hunting rifles. The reason prompting the steps was the increasing international isolation of South Africa which eventually led to the United Nations arm embargo. The instructions to Musgrave was to develop, manufacture and market a production rifle.
Musgrave became a subsidiary of Armscor during 1971 and the first rifles appeared on the shelves in 1972. At the same time a start was made with the building of a manufacturing facility on the Jagersfontein Road just outside Bloemfontein.
The company did well during the sanction years and manufactured around 6,000 hunting rifles per year to meet the demands of the South African hunting public. It was eventually run for the state by a man named Abie Koch, who clashed with many personalities in Musgrave’s client base. Koch was never held in high regard by the hunting public and many were greatly disappointed with his firearm knowledge.
After the democratization of South Africa and the lifting of the arms embargo, Koch’s management of Musgrave failed to achieve the adaptions necessary to face the competition of an influx of competitors from the United States, Czechoslovakia and a number of other countries. Musgrave was closed down, some of its tooling moved to Vektor, the state owned military small arms manufacturers, and the rest of its stock and assets sold off on public auction.
Also here:
http://www.gunsite.co.za/forums/showthr ... e-firearms
and here:
http://www.musgraverifles.co.za/about-musgrave.html

By the way the other language is "Afrikaans"
And I have never heard trap called "val"
Regards Andrew


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 Post subject: Re: Musgrave Beretta Booklet
PostPosted: Sun May 24, 2015 11:40 am 
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Thank you again for that very useful information.

As you can see from my "signature", I wrote a book about the Beretta A391. For several years I have been talking about writing an expanded version which would include all the models in the 300 series, as well as their clones (Browning B-80 etc), copies (Singer Nikko Gas Auto etc), and variations. The Musgrave Berettas certainly fit in there somewhere. At the rate I am working on the new book, I will be 150 years old by the time I finish it, but you have inspired me to go ahead and write a chapter on Musgrave while the information is fresh in my mind.

As I said above, the Wikipedia source I cited says that the Musgrave automatic is essentially a Beretta A300 with a barrel made by Musgrave. While that may be true of some of them, it does not tell the whole story. The Musgrave Beretta in my collection has a barrel made by Beretta, with all the usual marks by the company and the Italian national proof house, but is also stamped "MUSGRAVE". I would guess that the source of components in the Musgrave Berettas changed from time to time.

Image

That same gun also has a receiver with all the Beretta and Italian proof house marks, but also bears a deeply-engraved serial number in addition to the usual Beretta serial number. cpureaper, does that serial number look similar to anything you have seen on guns in RSA?
Image

_________________
My book on Beretta 391 Disassembly is no longer available.
My pen name is Irish, pronounced SHAY-mus oh-KOSH-eh-deh.


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 Post subject: Re: Musgrave Beretta Booklet
PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2015 12:54 pm 
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Joined: Fri May 09, 2014 8:10 am
Posts: 15
Some more info:

I will check my serial No and take some pics in due course.

Regards Andrew

A Brief History of Musgrave.
The former state owned South African sporting rifle manufacturer had its origins in private enterprise. The founder was the well-known late target champion, a resident of Bloemfontein - Benjamin (Ben) Musgrave (1900 - 1987).
Ben Musgrave (snr) started participating seriously in large calibre target shooting during 1933. His then service rifle was the Lee Enfield in 303 British calibre. ‘Uncle Ben’, as he was generally known, in due course started experimenting with the accuracy of his rifle as a hobby. These experiments were very successful and the South African target shooting fraternity flocked around Ben Musgrave to re-accurize their rifles in his spare time. This situation continued for approximately 27 years until 1950 when the demand for Musgrave’s services become so great that he could not handle it alone anymore. He canvassed the assistance of his son Trevor, which at that stage was an apprentice at Escom in Vereeniging.
During 1952 Musgrave was awarded Springbok (then RSA National) colours and then made the South African target shooting team chosen to participate in International competitions in the United Kingdom. During the competition he was introduced by Arthur Ilsley of Birmingham to the barrel manufacturer WD Lain who was about to retire. Lain agreed to train Trevor in the United Kingdom for Musgrave in the use of the rifling machine he used, with the intention of selling the machine thereafter to the Musgraves.
Trevor completed his training and in early 1953 the machine was brought to South Africa. Musgrave moved to Douglas Valley and resigned from the South African Railways and Harbours were he had been employed until then. The building on the property was modified to become the workshop and barrel manufacturing started in all seriousness. Musgrave’s success in the field of target shooting rifles continued and after six years another son, Benny Musgrave jnr. also joined his father and brother.
During 1969 Armscor approached the Musgraves with the idea to establish an infra structure for the manufacturing of commercial hunting rifles. The reason prompting the steps was the increasing international isolation of South Africa which eventually led to the United Nations arm embargo. The instructions to Musgrave was to develop, manufacture and market a production rifle.
Musgrave became a subsidiary of Armscor during 1971 and the first rifles appeared on the shelves in 1972. At the same time a start was made with the building of a manufacturing facility on the Jagersfontein Road just outside Bloemfontein.
The company did well during the sanction years and manufactured around 6,000 hunting rifles per year to meet the demands of the South African hunting public. It was eventually run for the state by a man named Abie Koch, who clashed with many personalities in Musgrave’s client base. Koch was never held in high regard by the hunting public and many were greatly disappointed with his firearm knowledge.
After the "democratization" of South Africa and the lifting of the arms embargo, Koch’s management of Musgrave failed to achieve the adaptions necessary to face the competition of an influx of competitors from the United States, Czechoslovakia and a number of other countries. Musgrave was closed down, some of its tooling moved to Vektor, the state owned military small arms manufacturers, and the rest of its stock and assets sold off on public auction.


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 Post subject: Re: Musgrave Beretta Booklet
PostPosted: Sat Dec 28, 2019 12:10 am 
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Joined: Sat Dec 28, 2019 12:08 am
Posts: 3
Can anyone report the manual for the Beretta s56e?


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 Post subject: Re: Musgrave Beretta Booklet
PostPosted: Wed Jul 29, 2020 5:55 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jul 29, 2020 5:22 pm
Posts: 2
Anyone have more information on the musgrave beretta A300’s.

Seamus, I’m envious of yours with the neat markings!


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 Post subject: Re: Musgrave Beretta Booklet
PostPosted: Tue Aug 04, 2020 6:59 am 
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Joined: Wed Jul 29, 2020 5:22 pm
Posts: 2
Anyone have the OP’s original pictures? They are gone and I wish I could save them.




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