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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking for what I should ask for this. Probably sell locally here in Michigan to avoid dealing with shipping. Getting older and not using anymore. 1946 (post war) M37. I would say mechanically = excellent; the action is real nice and slick and I've never had any problems with this gun. Wood = excellent. Metal = good.
 

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Fabarms L4s Initial Hunter Compact
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That's gorgeous wood. Locally, where a fella does not pay shipping or FFL fees, something in the neighborhood of $800 would be my guess. At auction, I bet you could get more.

Shipping isn't difficult, as you can pop off the barrel and the box for disaasembled gun isn't very long. USPS to the FFL holder with insurance is legal.
 
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That is an extra nice 16 gauge.
 

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I can't speak to what has happened on the market in the last 3 years. Having bought and sold a few Ithaca 16 gauge models, all in the early development range I can suggest some pros and cons about your firearm.

Pros
Wood - The wood on your gun is very nice. Something that might be a factor is if it is original or not, redone or not.
Bluing - Very nice for the age. Something that might be a factor is if it is original or a rebluing and if so, what version.
Date/Components - To anyone looking, the build looks pre-war and would likely carry that increase in value.

Cons
Full choke - I have found this tends to be the least valuable constriction.
Local sale - Unless you are doing an auction (and losing the difference in paying the seller) a local deal limits your ability to tap into a wider market craze like you see on gunbroker.

Ignoring the wood a moment, I was able to buy similar guns for $350 easily a few years ago. As I said in the beginning, apply whatever market adjustment you think is fair in the last few years and the value of that wood from that point on. If I was currently in the market, I would probably limit offer $500 and remain interested up to $575/600 before walking away.

Opinions are just that, and in the end, I hope you can get whatever you want or need for it!
 

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I can't speak to what has happened on the market in the last 3 years. Having bought and sold a few Ithaca 16 gauge models, all in the early development range I can suggest some pros and cons about your firearm.

Pros
Wood - The wood on your gun is very nice. Something that might be a factor is if it is original or not, redone or not.
Bluing - Very nice for the age. Something that might be a factor is if it is original or a rebluing and if so, what version.
Date/Components - To anyone looking, the build looks pre-war and would likely carry that increase in value.

Cons
Full choke - I have found this tends to be the least valuable constriction.
Local sale - Unless you are doing an auction (and losing the difference in paying the seller) a local deal limits your ability to tap into a wider market craze like you see on gunbroker.

Ignoring the wood a moment, I was able to buy similar guns for $350 easily a few years ago. As I said in the beginning, apply whatever market adjustment you think is fair in the last few years and the value of that wood from that point on. If I was currently in the market, I would probably limit offer $500 and remain interested up to $575/600 before walking away.

Opinions are just that, and in the end, I hope you can get whatever you want or need for it!
The only thing prewar is the forearm the stock has the postwar checkering pattern. And I can’t tell from the pic of the receiver is prewar blueing or postwar blueing. It’s a nice gun regardless.
 

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My post-war 12 gauge has identical checkering to that shown by the OP.

I thought "full" choke would be too much until I patterned it. My Ithaca "full" looks exactly like my Fabarms L4s 5/10 choke to me.. which is tight.. so maybe an IM. It's been perfect for farmed pheasants, and not too tight for even closer.

I bought (1946 12 gauge) mine 4 years ago for $275 from a 'tactical' gun shop. They didn't know what they had. What we'd pay for it and what it will auction for are different things. If you consider that Ithaca is still going, parts are still available, and a new one is MSRP starting at $1200 (and I like the old ones much better)... what people pay at auction is sometimes crazy if you have good photos and decent words.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for all comments. I actually like this gun slightly better than my 1939 M37, but the 1939 was an inheritance from my grandfather and I can't sell it.
 

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I’ve been watching Gunbroker like a hawk and things have cooled down on these guns. If the blue wasn’t worn off the barrel I’d say $500 for sure but with that said, full choke, and local sale? My guess is $400.
 

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Beautiful old gun! If it was a 20, you would have me as a buyer. Good luck!
 

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Glad you only want to sell locally. I have a weakness for the old 37s, a fresh box of 16ga shells and little resistance to buying shotguns. I’ll be moving along now.
 
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A ‘46 28” 16ga? $600 minimum with that wood, maybe $750. Mike Orlen will open the full to the choke of your choice for a mere $60 less the SGW member discount.
 
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