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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have 3 full boxes of 20 gauge, 3", remington ammo that has the "Dupont" logo on it. I found it in the corner of a local gun shop. Given the Dupont label I am assuming the ammo is 25 years old or so. I haven't shot any of it yet, but plan to do so when I have the chance. Any concerns about the age?
 

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adirondack46r said:
I have 3 full boxes of 20 gauge, 3", remington ammo that has the "Dupont" logo on it. I found it in the corner of a local gun shop. Given the Dupont label I am assuming the ammo is 25 years old or so. I haven't shot any of it yet, but plan to do so when I have the chance. Any concerns about the age?
No! Should work fine!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes, I found a couple of other threads here that seemed to indicate that there should be no problem. I also reallize that Dupont owned remington for a long time so the shells (plastic, not paper) could be older that I thought. Is there a way to tell from lot numbers or something how old they may be?

They are #4 lead, so I don't have much use for them. I may just pass them along to someone who could use them.
 

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I found a couple half boxes 12ga. UMC Nitro Club Game Loads that were made between 1926-1930. Paper hulls and roll crimped. I picked one out where the primer did not show any corrosion and it fired fine.

I think so long as they were kept dry 25 y.o. shells should be okay.
 

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That's my go to pheasant load in the 20 ga I got when I was 12. I have some shells that are from about the same era that were given to me when a relative passed away. They work fine. I just wish we had more pheasants around so I could use them up faster.
 

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I have a box of 3" #2 20 gauge loads I used to use when lead was legal for waterfowl - that's how old those are................25 years is nothing; go shoot and enjoy
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
noweil said:
That's my go to pheasant load in the 20 ga I got when I was 12. I have some shells that are from about the same era that were given to me when a relative passed away. They work fine. I just wish we had more pheasants around so I could use them up faster.
I was thinking that was a perfect application for these. Living in TN, we don't see too many pheasants, and they would do a job on a dove. ;-)
 

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When I was in my teens every year we would go pheasant hunting and it was traditional to go buy two boxes of pheasant loads. Most years we **** less than a box so I have several boxes of 45 year old pheasant loads. I did try some 6 shot solid plastic hulls I think they were Eley and they didn't function well. I do have some Federals 3" 20 gauge that are fine from the same era.
 

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I have several boxes of WWII vintage .45 ACP ammo that I bought at an estate sale and it shoots just fine. I've also shot shotgun shells manufactured in the 50's with zero problems. You should be just fine if the ammo has no visible defects.
 

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My experience with pre WWII ammo is that the primers failing to ignite is the most common reason for failure
 

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This question about old ammo comes up repeatedly. Unless it has been kept in really bad conditions for a long time it's basically not a problem. It is amazing what old military spec ammo can endure and still be fine. Obviously what you are asking about isn't mil-spec stuff but I have fired a great deal of shot shells from the 1930's on with zero problems. Clearly, if it shows storage problems like water damage, etc., that is a different matter. To me, anything manufactured past 1945 or so isn't "old".
 

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With the ammo shortage situation so bad, I would love to find several flats of 25 year old ammo at a good price. As said before, unless stored in some really lousy conditions it would be fine.
 

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Bamaskeetshooter said:
Shooting old ammunition is usually not a problem but becareful with corrosive primers.
I didn't know that corrosive primers had been used in commercial shotgun ammo. Certainly nothing made after the 1940's I would think. Maybe someone that knows can opine.
 

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During WWII the military trained aerial gunners with tracer shotgun shells. After the war my uncle "liberated" cases of them. Made by Remington #8 chilled shot. They had a tracer pellet in the wad. He shot them for decades. No issues except if freshly removed from the pack, the tracers would still burn. But after a week out in the air, the tracer failed to light. Old ammo is fine as long as the storage is good.
 
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