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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking at getting a 28g double.( sxs.. :roll: ..o/u) I'm looking at something like a stoeger or fausti or something .
anyhow..I've noticed most have fixed chokes of c/m. and thinking if I'm hunting pheasant,I'd like more choke for such a small gauge.any experience? I use m/f on my 20g and like the way it "hits hard".most shots will be over a dog,and I personally like #5 shot but #6 is ok too.problably better if only small load.
..and do any reload manuals have info for a full 1oz load?
thanks Ed :wink:
 

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When i first stared shootin the 28ga, i had the same mindset, with a smaller payload, i'll need tighter chokes.
I took the o/u 28ga dove hunting, and put in a mod and a imp.mod choke, i couldn't hit squat opening morning,then i finally got a good crosser that was a little ways away, and finally hit one of the little buggers with the mod choke, and it just hammered it!!!!
That's when i realized, i've got too much choke.
I went back to the truck and switched to I.C./ Mod.
I then started hitting birds great, almost couldn't miss with the I.C. choke on the first bbl.
I've also noticed the same thing pheasant hunting, i have a 12ga SxS mod/full, and have a heck of a time hittin roosters with it, if i do hit em, it's usually on the edge of the pattern and wounds them, it's a rare occasion indeed, when you actually "center" a rooster in the pattern, unless you shootin preserve birds, and i'm no pathetic shot,i just started shootin NSCA early this year, i won my states NSCA D class this year,punching me into C class, and i still have a hard time centering wild roosters with any regularity with tight chokes, i do much better with more open chokes by far, it fills out the edge of the pattern where you need more density.
Wild roosters have an uncanny ability to take subtle little angles that are hard to discern, sometimes "slightly" up or down, or sideways,and makes really centering them perfectly a real challenge indeed.
I'd go with the open choked 28ga. you'll be surprised how well it'll work.
As for 1oz 28 loads, forget it, 3/4oz work just as good if not better.1oz loads usually don't have anything resembling a wad, and usually pattern much worse than the 3/4oz loads.
my .02
 

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Ultramag has it right. I've shot a RRL 28 ga for five years for sharptails and pheasants over pointing dogs. I often have the skeet chokes in. If not, I've got it choked sk/ic. Only go to the IC/mod combo when shots will be a bit longer. Very deadly gauge with the right shells. I've shot a lot of roosters with 3/4 oz of Federal Premium copper-plated 7 1/2 shot. Use 6 shot for later in the season/longer shots. I've never used the full choke in this gun except when shooting clay pigeons.

I do feel one has to be selective on pheasant shots with this gauge...and willing to pass up shots beyond 35 yards or you risk wounding a lot of birds in my experience. (A better shot than I could maybe stretch that to 40. Others might be well advised to stay within 30 yards. Shoot some clays to get an idea; don't be afraid to pattern the gun with the loads you'll use hunting, as well.)

good luck whatever you choose.
hunter20ga
 

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I use my 28 ga and like cyl/mod or IC/Mod sometimes late in the year go to IC/IM I reload my own #5 3/4 ounce shot since all you can buy is #6 or smaller. The 1 ounce won't pattern as well as the 3/4 ounce shot. The 28 ga has a very small shot string so when you hit with it it really hammers the bird. Hits every bit as hard as the 20 ga and seems when I shoot a bird with it they are dead. Too bad I got this new Benelli M1 20 ga I can hardly put it down now and all my other guns are getting neglected....
 

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:wink: Somewhere, Jack O'Connor is smiling. This thread took me back about 45 years. Shoot safe and recruit a new shooter.
///olde :lol: pharte///
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
funny you should mention Jack O'connor.It was in his book on shotgunning he said I required greater choke on smaller gauge.Figured that since he was 'right on' most other things he be right about this too?!? I treat that book better than the Bible! Ed
 

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:) Good for ya, mate! Ol' Jacko was a right knowledgeable man where guns and hunting were concerned. Always need to keep in mind, though, that he was shooting scopes and ammo (both rifle and ******) that were at least very different from our modern stuff. Some would say the old stuff was inferior, but I do NOT want to stir up that hornet's nest!!! Keep us posted on the 28 and how it behaves for ya.
///olde 8) pharte///
 

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Choke it like a 20 gauge and shoot fast shells in 3/4oz and you'll be fine.
 

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pheasntguy said:
I'm looking at getting a 28g double.( sxs.. :roll: ..o/u) I'm looking at something like a stoeger or fausti or something .
anyhow..I've noticed most have fixed chokes of c/m. and thinking if I'm hunting pheasant,I'd like more choke for such a small gauge.any experience? I use m/f on my 20g and like the way it "hits hard".most shots will be over a dog,and I personally like #5 shot but #6 is ok too.problably better if only small load.
..and do any reload manuals have info for a full 1oz load?
thanks Ed :wink:
Ed,

There are a number of things you need to address here, the first being the range at which you'll be taking your birds. The 28ga is a great gun and they generally pattern beautifully, but because of their inherently small payload, their range is best limited to 35 yards, 30 would be better. Another thing about the 28 is that they generally do not like loads over 3/4 oz. This is especially true of the entry level guns you mention. I have found that their bore diameter is .535, not the standard .500, and that this contributes to poorer patterns with heavier loads. The last thing about the 28 to consider is that they usually do not digest anyting larger than #7 shot well. Sometimes #6s will be servicable, but that's as large as I'd care to go in a 28. If in need more than 3/4 oz or larger than #6s, I'll start moving up in caliber. There are people who have taken the time to carefully develop hand loads that will be contrary to this, but it is a painstaking proceedure.

Regarding the chokes, an IC pattern out of a 28 will be the same as an IC out of a 12, but you need to keep in mind that patterns are measured in percentages of loads and the 28 is starting out at a severe handicap in the load department when compared to the 12ga. The idea is to be able to put 4 to 6 pellets of adaquate remaining energy (usually about 1.5ftlbs) into the bird. Since the pheasant has a vital area of about 8 to 10 square inches (not counting the head and neck) you'll need a pellet distribution of about 1 pellet per 2 square inches. If your shot will all be inside of 30 yards, 3/4oz of hard #7 shot at 1200fps shot through IC/M will serve you well. The key is to be selective when it comes to range. If the bird is more than 30-35 yards away, let it fly.

Finally, I have seen some postings by "internet expert ballisticians" that claim clean kills on pheasant out to 70 yards using an ounce of #5 shot. Be careful with the advice you receive. An ounce of #5s contains 170 pellets. A 70 yard pattern will have about 25% of the original pellets in a 30 inch circle. That 30 inch circle contains over 700 square inches. That works out to be about 1 pellet per 16 square inches. Now, mind you, I'm not saying it can't be done, there are always those golden BBs, but consistancey is another matter as is the risk of crippling. The math just doesn't bear these claims out.

If you are worried about chokes, have you thought about havint tubes installed? Mike Orlen, who is a moderator on the gunsmithing forum is a recognized expert. All reports of his workmanship and turnaround time are top shelf. If you decide on an O/U, the Franchi Veloce Diamond at Dick's for $800 is an alternative. It does come in 28 ga, but it is not generallyt advertised as such. Of the three, the Stoeger, the Fausti and the Franchi, I think the Fausti is the best deal. While the Franchi is a better gun, they are being made in "mass production" format under an exclusive contract to Dick's. I've noticed some of the areas of metal finish to be a little lacking.

Hope this helps.

Frank
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
THANKS FRANK ! :wink: I appriciate the info.I read O'connors,Bristers,etc and understand the machanics,but also realize that the birds don't know it,so they don't always comply.My shots are over a dog,so they'll be close.I do believe in 'percentages'and try not to take longer shots than reasonable.Again,with a good dog,I've been tempted to take a .410,but don't care for it.I've shot sitting grouse up north with my 410.sitting at 20yds with #6 and had some fly away.moved up to #5 and better success.Shock value.I've seen pheasants with numerous hits with #7 or #6 for that matter,keep going 50 yds to drop dead mid-air,so I personally prefer to "hit them hard".
but..thought better to ask thoughs more experienced like yourself. :)

and YES...some of the things I read here I take with a BLOCK of salt !!! THANKS Ed
 

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pheasntguy said:
I've seen pheasants with numerous hits with #7 or #6 for that matter,keep going 50 yds to drop dead mid-air,so I personally prefer to "hit them hard".
This is a very interesting point, and I agree with you. Let me explain. Here on Long Island, the pheasants are basically a put and take affair, certainly not as tenacious as wild birds. I generally use anything from 3/4 oz of #7s in the 28 to 1 1/8 oz of #6s in a 12ga. Like you, I hunt over pointing dogs, so the birds are usually pretty close, inside 25-30 yards. What I found is that if I use the same gun and switch from #7s to #6s the pattern starts getting a little thin and the birds are incapacitated, but not completely dead. Since my guns are choked Sk/Sk or IC/M, I may need to tighten you about a half degeree of choke if I go to #6s. My point is, why bother? If my #7s are putting the birds on the ground dead (about 1.75ftlbs at 30 yards), then #6s are over kill. You, on the other hand have more confidance with heavier shot. You just need to tighten up your choke very slightly to compensate for fewer pellets in the pattern. I agree with Geogh Thomas in that the most important aspect in shooting is confidance. If you are confidant that your equipment will deliver the desired results, then, somehow, we seem to make it happen.

Get yourself a 28 (as I said, the Fausti is nice! :wink: ), pattern it with a couple of different loads at the ranges you expect to be shooting. If you find acceptable patterns with 3/4 oz of #5s, you'll be dropping every pheasant that you center.

The 28 is a grand gun.

Frank
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
food for thought Frank..got me thinking.your absolutely correct.I had to look back in the files.I did an experiment years back (one of a thousand)with my 20g.In my pocket,I had two different loads 7/8 oz #7.5 and 1oz #6.they patterned identically.I would load my gun without looking at the shell,only looking after the shot was made.I did do better with the 7.5.it was a faster shell than the one ounce #6,which was a thinner pattern,and problably longer shot string.So over the dog,7.5 did serve me better.
My problem is that,even though I do my homework and read the shotgun sciences,I play the "what if " game.what if the pheasants are flighty? what if I shoot slow today ?what if I see something else...I toss all night wondering about what gun and what shells.I drive myself crazy.And no matter what combination I end the day with,I usually do well....
CONFIDENCE IS EVERYTHING...Ed
 

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Ed,

Just a point of clarification. I was refering to #7 shot not #7.5s. It is a little difficult to find, but if you reload, you can get a bag off the internet. Try Recobs or one of those places. You wouyldn't think so, but that 1/2 size does make a difference. I have even heard of #6.5s, but I have yet to find any to try. Might up the pattern density enough to make a difference with the #6s.

Frank
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
jeez Frank..#6.5? Have to do more experiments :wink: !

thanks Ed
 

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I've been using 3/4 ounce copper plated 6's at 1300fps with great results out of the Stoeger Uplander.Which is advertised as IC/Mod.
 

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pheasntguy said:
I toss all night wondering about what gun and what shells.I drive myself crazy.And no matter what combination I end the day with,I usually do well....
CONFIDENCE IS EVERYTHING...Ed
Never have shot a 28ga but what Ed said I understand. I'm not a ballistics expert or any kind of expert for that matter. I have missed a few easy roosters over the years but I have taken a very high percentage of my shots. I shoot 12 ga. lead. I've used 71/2, 6, 5, 4, 2 (in a pinch) and even unknown reload gifts. They have been put through a Savage 755A, Parker SxS, Winchester 1200, Ithaca 900XL, Remington 870, which I freely interchange because I enjoy them all. I prefer MC but have used FC for many years as well. Always have used 2/34 inch but powder and shot oz really not always known. This may be close to heresy for the true afficianados but whenever I have centered the bird, it has been DOA no matter the gun or the ammo. Over the course of 40 years I have lost a few roosters but that would be in the single digits. Only lost one with the dogs over the last 6 years. There were so many birds in a slough bottom that the dog just had way too much scent in his nose to find the dead bird when others kept flushing around him whenever he moved. I try only to shoot within a reasonable range (30-35 max). If the bird is in the pattern, they will be in the bag and on your plate in due course. I don't disagree with going through the patterning at various ranges and loads to gain some basic understanding. I do agree with Ed that ultimately it is a confidence issue. I have tried to analyze what I do but cannot really describe it. When I try thinking through a shot, the bird keeps flying. I know I do not aim and I think both eyes are open but I can't swear to that. I do know that a lot of hunting in my youth developed the confidence and it has been a source of fun for decades. Enjoy every day in the field that you can. The older we get the shorter we realize that our time on this precious planet is really pretty short. Regards, Jack
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
thanks Jack,
needed to hear someone say that.When I was young and "stupid" it was use what is there and shoot what you have.The birds fell.Now that I'm older and "smarter",reading the books and doing the pattern tests,I shoot worst.took much thinking!!.I asked an old pro trap shooter once,how he shot so well and made it look so simple.he said "If I think about what i'm shooting at,I do bad.But when I think about where I'm putting the tomato plants next year,and the target catches me by surprize,I do good.don't think about shooting,just do it!"
I BELIEVE THERE'S TRUTH IN WHAT HE SAID.
Ed
p.s. I hear the pheasants out your way are skittish?
 

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pheasntguy said:
p.s. I hear the pheasants out your way are skittish?
I have hunted only wild pheasant in Saskatchewan. In my youth, in Alberta, we sometimes hunted in areas where birds had been released. Some of those were not very skittish. I have some favourite spots in SE (Long Creek) and SW (Wood Mountain, Wood River, Noteku Creek). Early morning of opening day you might find a few complacent birds but by noon and until the end of the late season the adrenalin will run high. The really skittish ones are those making sure there will be a spring hatch. Some are local legends - you know, the fisherman's big one that got away. There is not a large population and SK only provides a licence to residents for pheasant. Roosters only. 3 daily limit, 6 possession. What can you tell me about Pelee Island - have you ever hunted pheasant there? Regards, Jack
 

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Hi, new to the board, but have been hunting pheasants 12 to 20 outings a year for the past 10 years or so.

I shoot over setters and generally carry the 28 (a Ruger o/u) only for game farm pheasants. For state-released or for wild birds I generally take a SigArms (B.Rizzini TR20U) in 20 or Beretta 686 Ultralight in 12.

In the 28, I've had good luck going IC/M with 3/4 oz. of #7.5s in the bottom and the Winchester 1oz. load of #6 in the top. I know the 1oz. load for 28 isn't terribly well thought of, but it's performed well out of my Red Label, which I believe is back-bored.

In any gauge over pointing dogs, I generally start the day with #7.5s in the bottom and #6s in the top. For chokes, I often go IC/IM. I carry 4 or 5 rounds of #5 and switch to the 6 in the bottom/5 in the top combo if the birds aren't holding very well.
 
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