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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I was a contender I practiced mostly with the 410. Now that I am a has-been I rarely practice with the 410. Heck, I hardly shoot the 410. I'm unclassed in the 410 by NSSA.

But I have primers and 410 wads, cases, and powder. I still enjoy shooting skeet, tho it needn't be registered. A convenient skeet league would be wonderful, but I don't have that luxury. So I am considering making the onerous drive to shoot some skeet "practice", tho it would more just shooting recreational skeet than true practice.

I'm thinking I'll shoot much of that practice/recreational skeet with the 410. What could go wrong? At worst I could mess up my skeet game, but it's been messed up for awhile.

Heck I might even shoot a registered 410 event this year.....if one is close and convenient.
 

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There is just a certain something about the .410 that is really fun...
 

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Interesting thread here. I started shooting skeet about 1968. The fellow who taught me was a state senior champion for several years. He told me that if you could consistently hit a target with a thimble full of #9, then a bucket full of #9 would be easy. If I could afford a .410, reloading components and regularly competed in registered targets in all four gauges, I would practice with the .410. JMHO.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
There is just a certain something about the .410 that is really fun...
And frustrating.

Probably the biggest problem with practicing with the 410 is that it can make you think you have a big problem when you just have a little, probably temporary, problem. That's why when I was a contender, I switched to 20 gauge to work on a problem. Now I'm too slothful to change tubes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The biggest complaint I hear is from increased recoil with the larger gauges as compared to the .410.
Interesting. I had a 28" Beretta I had tubed for skeet. Recoil if I used it naked w/o tubes felt abusive. But I started using that gun to shoot sporting in the off-season and the recoil is tolerable, tho I use 1 oz loads ~1200 fps for sporting.
 

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I used to resist practicing with the 410, but then someone recommended I start every practice shooting 2-3 boxes of the little gun before finishing practice with 20 or 28. The 410 has helped my game tremendously.

As far as tubes, I hated changing them out so I switched to a barrel set. Much much easier and much less hassle to shoot multiple guns in one practice.
 

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When I was a contender I practiced mostly with the 410. Now that I am a has-been I rarely practice with the 410. Heck, I hardly shoot the 410. I'm unclassed in the 410 by NSSA.

But I have primers and 410 wads, cases, and powder. I still enjoy shooting skeet, tho it needn't be registered. A convenient skeet league would be wonderful, but I don't have that luxury. So I am considering making the onerous drive to shoot some skeet "practice", tho it would more just shooting recreational skeet than true practice.

I'm thinking I'll shoot much of that practice/recreational skeet with the 410. What could go wrong? At worst I could mess up my skeet game, but it's been messed up for awhile.

Heck I might even shoot a registered 410 event this year.....if one is close and convenient.
I'm sorry but I don't see a problem here. With all the reloading components, cost will not be an issue. ENJOY!!!!
 

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I've found I cannot shoot with Tubes. Was a time when I used to do upper body weight training to build muscle mass for the day when my body stopped making enough testosterone to build muscle but Arthritis threw a whacking big monkey wrench into those plans. So tubes just creates too much swing mass for me to shoot with them in a registered shoot.

My solution was to purchase a 410/28 gauge combo gun. That has proven to be the smartest gun purchase I have ever made. It's light, responsive and with 30 inch barrels it's also stable. As a result its a pure joy to shoot. So every skeet session now starts with at least 2 boxes of 410 and if I get frustrated with misses all I have to do is mount the 28 gauge barrels. As a result I've started hitting 25 in the 12 gauge and hitting in the 20's with the 28. The 410 is still a challenge but my average is currently at 18.5 and I'm starting to hit in the low 20's with the 410. BTW, started shooting Skeet seriously in 2020 and did my first Registered shoot in April of this year. So I'm still pretty green but I've improved at every single shoot I've been to and much of that improvement has been due to practice with the 410.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Standard practice session- 2 rounds 20ga, 2 rounds 28ga, 2 rounds 410, leading up to a comp. shoot I'll end with a couple rounds of doubles 3,4,5.
Ja, but I'd probably skip the 2 rounds with 28 gauge and go right to 410, IF I broke at least one 25 straight with the 20. This winter/spring I'll probably go directly to 410 since I have a comfortable supply of WW296 powder.
 

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I really like the .410 it is all I shoot, shoulder doesn't handle recoil well and middle age is creeping up 68 yrs young. A year and a half ago I started skeet I still remember the day I said "I got one" today I can average 20's no 25's yet. Do not let the mental aspects of the little gun get you down it will do it's part if you do yours. It's easy on the lead and great fun without the recoil.
JW
 
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