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Jeweling is strictly cosmetic. It serves no purpose other than to hide tool marks. Make sure to properly lube the gun. The old timers used to claim it helped hold oil, not true.
The old timers may not have been wrong. The sliding ways on precision machines (the metal-to-metal parts like lathe carriages and mill saddles) were "frosted" after precision scraping-in to fit. The frosting is a light distortion of the surfaces and was intended to hold a thin film of oil to retard metal-to-metal contact. It is not as regular as jeweling but, in the hands of a master toolmaker, it was quite attractive and functional. Modern manufacturing practice mostly uses precision ground surfaces with an interface of teflon-loaded magic stuff like Turcite.

geo
 

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The old timers may not have been wrong. The sliding ways on precision machines (the metal-to-metal parts like lathe carriages and mill saddles) were "frosted" after precision scraping-in to fit. The frosting is a light distortion of the surfaces and was intended to hold a thin film of oil to retard metal-to-metal contact. It is not as regular as jeweling but, in the hands of a master toolmaker, it was quite attractive and functional. Modern manufacturing practice mostly uses precision ground surfaces with an interface of teflon-loaded magic stuff like Turcite.

geo
We are talking about firearms. Grease slow moving, oil fast moving parts.
 

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In the 70's when Perazzi first came into the US through Ithaca Guns Daniele Perazzi sent the Master Perazzi gunsmith Giacomo Arrighini to the US. He is still here. And swears by Triflow.

I first learned of Triflow when in the yards at Bremerton, Wa. in the late 70's as well, a yardbird turned me onto it. I have always had some on hand since. I get it at bike shops, racing bikers use it to lube the chain and sprocket. It stays in place in the rain and through mud. And reduces resistance enough to make the difference between a win or loss.

Spending 20 years as a Machinist Mate Chief I can talk lubrication of pretty much everything including hydrodynamic herringbone grooved journal bearings with thrust bearings until both our eyes glaze over.

For 15 years I shot a JEG EELL Gold E custom combo. I shot 10k-12k rounds a year through it and I shot it well. So conservatively ran at least 150,000 rounds through it, likely a good bit more.

Looked like new when I sold it and got out of it what I paid for it 15 years earlier. Lever was well right of center and it still locked up tighter than a drum. These are some of the pictures when I listed it.



Even the jeweling still looked like new



Yours may be a Browning but clean and lube it with Triflow after every use. Bet it stops wearing the jeweling.
 

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In the 70's when Perazzi first came into the US through Ithaca Guns Daniele Perazzi sent the Master Perazzi gunsmith Giacomo Arrighini to the US. He is still here. And swears by Triflow.

I first learned of Triflow when in the yards at Bremerton, Wa. in the late 70's as well, a yardbird turned me onto it. I have always had some on hand since. I get it at bike shops, racing bikers use it to lube the chain and sprocket. It stays in place in the rain and through mud. And reduces resistance enough to make the difference between a win or loss.

Spending 20 years as a Machinist Mate Chief I can talk lubrication of pretty much everything including hydrodynamic herringbone grooved journal bearings with thrust bearings until both our eyes glaze over.

For 15 years I shot a JEG EELL Gold E custom combo. I shot 10k-12k rounds a year through it and I shot it well. So conservatively ran at least 150,000 rounds through it, likely a good bit more.

Looked like new when I sold it and got out of it what I paid for it 15 years earlier. Lever was well right of center and it still locked up tighter than a drum. These are some of the pictures when I listed it.



Even the jeweling still looked like new



Yours may be a Browning but clean and lube it with Triflow after every use. Bet it stops wearing the jeweling.
Based on the MSDS, and a review I came across on Amazon, Triflow may no longer have PTFE (teflon) in it, or at least the formula has changed.

https://www.amazon.com/Tri-Flow-Squeeze-Bottle-Lubricant-Teflon/dp/B00GC54OC2/#customerReviews (see review that accompanies one of the photos)

I found an old MSDS for their grease, and it specifically listed Tetrafluoroethene Polymer, but their current MSDS for the oil does not list it:

The packaging says "Formulated with PTFE", not "Contains PTFE", dunno.
 

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I'd say it's pretty normal. A little grease on all the metal-metal wear areas will help.
or oil; proper jeweling should also hold a little oil there
 

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I found mine did that much quicker when using grease instead of oil. It took 32 years and 50,000+ rounds to show half that much wear on the jewelling of my 101 using oil and only a few hundred rounds using grease on my 725. I no longer use grease. I went back to oil. RemOil to be specific. I like that stuff best of all. Been using it as long as I can remember.
 

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I found mine did that much quicker when using grease instead of oil. It took 32 years and 50,000+ rounds to show half that much wear on the jewelling of my 101 using oil and only a few hundred rounds using grease on my 725. I no longer use grease. I went back to oil. RemOil to be specific. I like that stuff best of all. Been using it as long as I can remember.
I'm not so sure that was a particularly fair test for grease. The jewelling wear is a result of the barrel block being ever so slightly too large for the frame recess. If your 725 had more physical interfence than your 101 then it was going to wear more than the 101 no matter what lubricant was put in there.
 

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Can anyone advise why my jeweling is wearing on my 725 please gun hasn’t had much use and im getting a little concerned.
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Consider that perhaps the gun was hard-fit. For me, that would be a good thing. A gun that shows no surface wear very quickly may be a little more loosely fit than I would like.
 
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