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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here are a few of many simple things you can do to wring better accuracy from your slugger.
This applies primarily to the popular American do it all pump gun but tricks would work with the auto loaders.
You decide,
You need consistant tension on the barrel to receiver fit.
No need to make it gorilla tight but firm.


Note the hole in the screw head that holds the barrel to the receiver.
Make it close to 1/2" deep if possible, use a small hex wrench to lever the thing tight.
Two holes are better, one of each opposite side of the screw head.



POLISH the bore. PLEASE DO NOT DO THIS TO A RIFLED BORE!

This is a bore brush wrapped in steel wool. Use #1, thru #4.
Scotch pads work well also.
Take a half inch dowel, cut a slot in one end. Cut a Scotch pad to snuggly fit the bore and insert the pad in the slot of the dowel.
Use a 1/2" hand drill to rotate the pad inside the bore.
HANG ON TO THE BARREL as the whole rig can turn and you could damage the barrel if it starts to turn,
Secure barrel by holding it with one hand.

These polishing methods reduce leading greatly.

LUBE THE FLIPPIN' SLUG.

I use white lithium grease.
You must not use anything that will migrate down into the powder charge.
I like the Brenneke K.O. 'cause you can SEE the lube inside the case.
If lube migrates past the wads to the powder then use that one at the range, NOT for hunting.
A little experience will teach you this valuable trick.
You can reduce, mut not eleminate leading.
Clean that barrel with a stainless tornado brush every five shots until you get ALL the lead out.
Leading absolutely destroys accuracy.
Again this tip is for smooth bores.
DO NOT SHOOT FOSTERS FROM YOUR RILED BARREL EVER!

Already posted recently is a tip to add a shim under the barrel lug if necessary. Good tip.
 

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"DO NOT SHOOT FOSTERS FROM YOUR RIFLED BARREL EVER!"

That statement leaves me wondering about the depth of your experience with slug shooting. You are correct if you say that the rifled slug is less accurate (possibly) at longer ranges or that increased leading may occur with a soft lead foster slug in a rifled bore.
(As for the above statement you must have picked that up at the local sporting goods store from hired seasonal help that believe everything they read.) Ever shoot an ol' ITHACA 37 SLUG GUN with rifled bore and fosters ? It may really be a rude awakening.

My 35 years of exposure to using slugs would dissagree with your basic statement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Neo: Thanks for the rude comment.
The warning I posted about shooting fosters from a rifle barrel was for the shooter with limited experience with shotguns and slugs.
Shooting fosters in a rifled barrel is a sure way to lead the rifling badly.
I've seen severe leading in rifled barrels after only five Winchester fosters.
I've seen rifled barrels turned into smoothies after 10 soft lead fosters.
Shooting foster slugs in a rifled barrel may not be dangerous but is is sure to hinder accuracy once that rifled barrel gets clogged with lead.
Once severely leaded it's a bear to get all the lead out of a rifled tube.
No need to be nasty.
My posts were meant to be helpful.
Isn't that why we are here?
 

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I didn't find his comments rude at all. Not nearly as some of yours I have read recently. He simply disagreed with you is all.

As will I. Rifled barrels have been around longer than saboted slugs have been popular. They were originally designed to extend the range of existing foster slugs, which they do.

It's not rocket science to clean a shotgun barrel that gets fouled by soft lead slugs. It just takes some time and elbow grease. Or you can chuck up a soft brush in a cordless drill, works really well most of the time.

I can shoot rifled slugs out of my H&R ultra and have it cleaned like new in less than 20 minutes, and that includes breaking the gun down. It does make a mess though.

Paul
 

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What a lot of people fail to realize is that the brinnell hardness of the lead has a lot to do with the efficiency of the projectile.
The fin projection design also has a lot to do with the land and groove engagement that optimizes accuracy along with the base wad design.
(Most pistol shooters will tell you lead bullets can and are made so that they will minimally lead the pistol barrel.)

If you are using the example noted in your post to impress my lack of understanding let me put something in perspective.

We sight-in at my club about 1200 shooters during a 30 day period when it is open to the public. I fire easily over 150 slugs a day. (Yes, I do have a hydraulic dampening firing armature. I didn't say I was into Pain.) I have been doing that for about 10 years. I have seen "almost" everything in the combinations you mentioned. None have had the extreme fouling effect short of absolute soft "slugging lead " for bores. 5 Shots Really ?

I just got back from the range tonight where are guest found that shooting 3" Brenneke's (non-sabot ) just happened to be the diet his 870 rifled shotgun liked best at 50 yds.

He had just spent over $95.00 for various superslugs (sabot). None of those would group for him well. The barrel was a bit of an anomly.

He then fired 8 boxes (Brenneke's) and cleaned the bore with 4 passes of a bore snake. Yes, it was fouled....minimally. But it was FAR from a smoothbore.
His groups AVERAGED 1-3/4" +- c/c for 5 shots at 50 yds. Yes, you do have to clean it, but that is a normal process.

The barrel was checked before and after cleaning so it this was not an idle observation.

As for me I like Brenneke Gold if I am flush and K.O. if I am lacking funds.

You have your opinion and I have mine. Let us leave it at that.
 

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I had burrs where they ported the barrel on a new 500 rifled barrel. I used fosters to smooth them out. And YES they leaded the barrel. But they sure had a good group at 100yds. I put a piece of tshirt over the brass brush to hold the solvent and bristel. That way they cleaned better. I now shoot lightfield 3" ISD that are now discontinued. So I will have to try something else. :cry:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
neophyte:
Your experience is irrefutable.
No question about it.
I would resectfully ask for all the help you can give to me.
I'm hardly inexperienced but recognize that no one can know everything about anything.
That is why the internet can be a remarkably valuable tool for those willing to share. And those willing to listen. :wink:
Just a bit of my personal background so you can understand where I'm comming from.
Retired police SWAT which including more firearms schools than I need to mention.
45 years a hunter.
50 plus deer taken with slugs, all but a few with smoothies and fosters.
A long time ago a bunch of us good ol' boys would buy Winchester 1 oz slugs by the case and try all manner of tricks, many failures, a few successes, to get the mostest from the slick bores.
Back then we found Federal and Remington grossly UNDERSIZED, the Winchester about .730, if memory serves me right.
We learned to lube the slug while it's in the hull.
We even learned to insert a screw down the center of the slug and into the wad column to make our own version of the Brenneke which once had it's filler wads screwed up into the center of the slug.
Back then I stumbled onto the one and only smoothie anyone ever saw (in my circle) that could sometimes group 2 MOA at 100, an 870 police riot gun with sights and sadly missed.
I took many deer with that smoothie including a wintessed shot on a running button buck, hit in the head at 175 long paces.
And YES, it was a slobber shot.
Pure luck, all good for me and all bad for the hapless deer.
By the way. For Paul.
If memory serves me right the RIFLED 12 bore was 1st commercially marketed by Ithaca for the BRI sabot slug which was the old wasp waisted .50 caliber hard lead slug inside a shoe or sabot at about 1250 f.p.s.
Winchester and Federal now load a similar round.
In my curretn rifled 870 they will group 1.5" at 100 with ease but at around 1200 to 1300 f.p.s. they are a bit of a dud beyond 100 or I would not be looking for better.
 

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I guess I am a failure at what I have tried to explain. But then I have failed before....

By the way IF you remember the BRI Slug was originally conceaved as a round specifically designed for 870 cruiser shotguns for the police. That projectile had a brinnell hardness that could and did crack engine blocks when they were hit.
The old ones were a black sabot with a wooden plug at the base of slug......if my memory serves me correctly.

As for my credentials outside of practical experience just consider me a simple 'neophyte" on your subject.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
neo:
Your experience makes your opinions of great value.
I once had my own gun shop, worked part time for friends with guns shops.
We had customers bring in Mossy smoothies complaining of zilch accuracy and increasing recoil.
Examination revealed the Mossy barrels were pretty rough inside and they had been leaded to the point of being almost one ***** smaller due to lead build up.
We could only get the lead out by using a wire brush wrapped in #1 steel woold with the cleaning rod chucked in a 1/2" drill and a lot of work.
The lead came out in chunks and sometimes like bits of lead foil. :(
 

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What do you want from a product that is really produced out of this country ? The production facility in Eagle Pass Texas is just across the river from the U.S. Border. 99 % of the employees are Mexican. Interior Barrel finish is not one of their strong points. Neither is a true installation of a cantilever mount. Recently it is a depressing issue of quality control.
Sandblasted bores do foul quickly.

Yours is a SWAT background ? Interesting. Mine was MOUT training for Bn. sized units
 
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