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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thinking about a BT-99. From what I can see it comes in 3 flavors; conventional, adj. comb, and adj. comb/GraCoil recoil reduction system. Seems like the price doubles from the bottom to the top model. Is the benefit worth the extra money? Also considering the Citori XT Trap. Any opinions?
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If you are ever going to shoot doubles and you only want to buy one gun, get the Citori. I did and it is fantastic. If all you want to shoot are singles and handicap, the BT99 is also a great gun for the money.

As for the adjustable comb, if the standard stock fits, no need to spend the extra cash. If the standard stock does not fit, the adjustable comb goes a long way to solving some of the problems.
 

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I bought a new BT-99 with adj comb early this spring. I'm very glad I opted for the adj comb. A very small adjustment in the comb can really make a big improvement in fit - and scores.

I'm so happy with it I am going to have an aftermarket adj comb installed on my doubles gun this winter.
 

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An adjustable comb is worth every nickle if a change in a gun's comb height is needed or if you want the gun to pattern at different heights above the point of aim for different uses or shooting disciplines.

It is equally important if you need to move the comb horizontally to allow alignment of your eye with the rib.

There will probably be no way to determine if you need an adjustable comb without handling the model of gun you intend to buy. To do that, you may be able to find one at the club where you shoot if not in the store that is selling the gun.

If you anticipate gaining or losing weight while you own the gun, an adjustable comb is a must.

Rollin http://stockfitting.virtualave.net/
 

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I've got one on my new (to me) BT-99. Only problem is, I can't get it adjusted quite low enough! I need to go down another 1/16" or so, and I'm at the bottom already...

As it is now I've got a little daylight between the mid and front beads. I could adjust the (adjustable) rib up a bit, but then I'd be shooting higher than I am, and it's already a tad high.

Too many adjustments, too little time! :)

-- Sam
 

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Sam;
Your only feasable option to lower the comb relative to the height of the rib is raise the existing rib. This is done by the use of an add-on rib. They come in about any heights you will ever need up to 3/4". It has the same effect as lowering the comb; removing wood from the top of an adjustable comb can create new problems.

Rollin
 

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Thanks for your reply, Rollin. I have been debating whether to go ahead and get your stock fitting guide as another step in reaching trapshooting nirvana with all these adjustments. I was also going to post the following in the Gunsmithing section, but as long as we're on the topic...

My BT has an adjustable rib too, so I should be able to compensate with that. However, I first have to figure out how the adjustment works; It's not covered in the manual I downloaded from Browning. Looks like a set-pin and screw arrangement.

However, it was my (perhaps mistaken) understanding that by raising the rear of the rib - which would squeeze out the daylight between the beads - I would be raising the point of impact, much like raising the rear site on a pistol or rifle. The gun already shoots somewhat high as it is (was) currently set up, and I wouldn't mind raising the POA a bit. I had hoped that by lowering the comb I would accomplish this. (I found myself floating the bird a foot over the front bead when I last shot the gun - and hitting it.) At that time I had significant daylight between the beads. Now, by adjusting the comb to its lowest position, I'm darn close, but of course I need to pattern the gun again.

I'm also struggling a bit with toe-in on the butt pad and the cast adjustment of the comb. Even though this gun was owned by a lefty shooter, it is set up for right-hand toe-in (pad is canted to the right when looking from the rear). The cast also appeared to be set for a righty, with ~1/4" deflection to the right of the stock.

Finally, this gun has a 14-1/4" LOP, while my other gun has exactly 15", and the latter, while extremely long based on most specs I've seen, seems to be more comfortable to me, even though I'm of mostly normal build. I'd like them to be close as possible, so I have the least amount of change to get used to when switching from singles to doubles. And I don't think the unbranded recoil reduction unit on this gun has a LOP adjustment.

If you'd be willing to respond to this and set me on the right path I'd be eternally grateful. Or PM me if you don't want to do a lengthy post. Or if all this is covered in your guide, let me know and I'll buy a copy.

-- Sam
 

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Sam;

Just so no one thinks I ignored your questions, I will mention that they were answered in the two e-mail replies.

Rollin
 

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Rollin Oswald said:
Sam;

Just so no one thinks I ignored your questions, I will mention that they were answered in the two e-mail replies.

Rollin
Good point, Rollin. I was remiss for not mentioning it as an update to this topic myself.

My questions we very well answered, too! This man knows his stuff, and is good at communicating it. I'm buying a copy of his guide for reference.

-- Sam
 
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I believe they are certainly worth the price. It's very nice to be able to make some fine adjustments to the stock to get it to fit just right. Another good advantage is over the long term if your body type changes (either from growing larger as a youth or gaining/loosing weight) you can adjust the comb for the same sight picture.

One thing to beware of though is once you have it set right LEAVE IT ALONE. Adjustable stocks are nice but people have a tendancy to play with them too much. They will have a bad day or even a bad week and the first thing they do is start changing the adjustments on the gun. This can cause way more problems than it fixes.
 
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