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I'm looking for advice on beginning obedience training. Can I find what I need online? I would like to do it myself. I am picking up my 12 week old Vizsla tomorrow! :D I'm ready for your help!

Thanks in advance.
 

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Do you mean obedience for competition (AKC, UKC, etc.) or just basic groundwork for later hunt training?

Actually, in either case my recommendation is to start with beginning puppy classes -- lots of places have them. You'll start with the absolute basics: polite walking on leash, sits and downs, things like that. More advanced classes will get you into recalls, heeling, longer stays, etc. Classes, regardless of how much training experience you have, also offer your dog the opportunity to socialize with other dogs in a controlled environment, and also get the dog used to following your commands wherever he is and no matter what distractions are around. This is crucial regardless of what you want to train your dog to do long-term.

There are plenty of books and videos which cover these topics as well, but I feel that every new dog owner should do at least a basic puppy or beginner class with their dog. The costs are usually fairly minimal (I think $50-$100 for an 8-10 week class is pretty standard around here) and you and your dog will get a lot out of it.

My final piece of advice is to pick a series of commands and stick with them no matter what you are doing. "Come" and "Here" may be the same to you, but to a dog they are completely different. Consistent use of the same commands through whatever classes, home training, and professional training you do will improve your results enormously. If you are using different commands than a trainer or class teacher just talk to them in advance and use your commands. The same goes for anyone else who will be giving the dog commands -- kids, spouses, friends, whoever.
 

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My best advice is a sharp "NO" is about the best correction for a Vizsla. Work only for a short time, a puppy (Vizsla) will get bored and grumpy if you work it to much and decides it wants to play now. Work short and end with a positive response (from the dog that is). Use some high value treat, something it will not get unless it is training, little bits of hot-dogs (Nathan's are good and smoky will draw their nose) or little bits of chicken. Probably best to just work "stay" and "come" for a while. With a light 5/8" x 6' lead, get it to stay, back up a step or two, if it follows push it back to the starting spot and "STAY" back up, return to the "stayed" dog and treat, then break it out with a little touch to the head. "Come" may take the help of a partner to steady the dog while you back up, call "come"...treat and hug.
repeat on the house rules from below thread...
Yeah, some house rules are good. Stay off the furniture is OK, good time to teach "OFF." ("Off" is different from "down", which means lie_down_, everyone must be consistent with the difference) The pup should be fed after you eat, 2 points there, whets their appetite and establishes "Alpha dog." Time to teach "Whoa" when leaving the house, you leave through the door first, pup follows, again alpha-dog thing, but also prevents bolting out the door into trouble. That can be tricky with a self-closing screen door; lead dog to door, "whoa," open door, "stay" step thru door, hold screen, then "come". This is all simple obediance stuff but when it comes to bird training the obediance will help, especially "whoa."
 

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1. Don't set your expectations too high for each session.
2. Keep it short (10 minutes), maybe twice a day.
3. Always reward (cut thin wafers of hotdog and fry them, yummy) and keep it positive.
4. Combine hand signals with each command, the dog will gradually pick those up.
5. Buy the book "Speed Train Your Bird Dog" by Larry Meuller (sp?) - it's the best book ever and easy to read.
 

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Get a good puppy book. One that has within it the subjects: potty training, bonding and socialization.

Second, before you start training, pick a decent training program. The ones I would recommend are: Delmar Smith or Huntsmiths, NAVDA blue book (alot of people recommend it here) or Paul Long's. Huntsmith also has a good puppy development dvd series.

Thirdly, join a club, field trial affiliated or otherwise and make a few friends with dog people. They are always willing to show you what they know and sometimes you can even borrow their stuff.
 
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