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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
being a newbie at this I'm not hitting very many,most times I get maybe 10 to 14 and am getting frustrated.I have been trying to follow and pass the bird before I shoot,but they sure move fast.Last week end I saw a man bust nearly every one and he wasn't shooting the way I do. It looked like he was just pointing his shotgun above the stake in the ground and shooting at a predetermined time.Have any of you all seen this done?if so how do you do it?Do the clays from both low and high houses both cross above the stake in the ground? Tell me the secret,please,before I drive myself crazy. thanks. sj :rolleyes
 

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There is no real secret, other than realizing, without regard for wind variations, the clays will take a predetermined path at a predetermined speed at the time you call for it.Whether you use a pass through or a sustained lead the final objective is to cause the shot from your gun to intercept the above flight path of the clay at the instant the clay does. Your margin of error is the radius of your shot pattern at that point.The very best thing you can do is hook up with a qualified instructor before you develop some bad habits.Personally, I use a sustained lead with a hold point a respectable distance from the house. The longer you shoot skeet the slower the targets will get. Although today they may seem like asprins being shot out of a cannon some day they will be a mere albatross about to land.
 

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In skeet sustained lead is the way to go. As far as the bird getting a jump on you there are ways to solve it with hold point correction and looking back for the bird. A good video to help you with it is the Todd Bender video. It shows foot positions, hold points, where to break the bird and has the eye cam used so you can actually see what is going on in regular speed and slow motion. Shows all the stations and is very simple to follow. My dad bought the video and it has really helped him.Steven
 

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SJ,Are you a hunter? Do you have a good gun mount from the gun down position? If so, try shooting that way-with the gun not mounted when you call for the bird. Look at the target and forget about what your bbl looks like. I had shot a ton of trap and had a lifetime of hunting under my belt when I shot my first round of skeet. I did OK-something like 21 or 22, but for a dedicated clays nut this sucked, and it didn't get any better. I had an 1100 Rem that I was using, and it was a light kicker, so on an impulse I tried shooting gun down. Guess what? Four rounds=no missed targets! Everyone, especially me, was shocked. "You can't do it that way!" was the most common thing said. I have since "graduated" to sporting and never shoot gun up any more except for the rare round of trap. Worked for me as I, too, was having difficulty with the "picture" of lead. Just look at the target and it will tell you how much lead you need...if you have the necessary experience and technique in your memory bank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
yes,I am a hunter,that is why I started shooting skeet and trap,to help me improve for bird hunting. I also shoot an 1100 and it is threaded for colonial chokes. I have tried skeet,improved,and modified for skeet and decided the improved is the best one.For trap,I use the improved-modified.I also hand load and have tried 7 1/2,8,9,for both skeet and trap. Have settled on 8 or 9's for skeet and 7 1/2 or 8's for trap.I can do a lot better on 5 stand. I can usualy go 19 to 22 on that.The easiest for me is the straight aways from the low house,I can get them almost every time.Some of those clay birds remind me of teal coming across your decoys with their afterburners on full.
 

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Hey SJ, If you decide to try skeet gun down and still feel like they are going to escape because they seem so fast try this. Make your eyes go to the front edge of the target as soon as you see it. In other words, don't look at the whole thing or you will end up shooting behind it. Best time to try this is when you are pulling for someone else or just watching someone else shoot. Put your skeet choke back in, and as long as the targets are still on the field you will break them. Be sure to pattern your gun for point of impact so that you aren't shooting somewhere other than where you are looking. You know that skeet targets are predictable in that they are always thrown to the same place, so you already know where to look for them. Sure, there are differences in opinionas to how close to the house to look, but in order for this to work you have to start somewhere, so try something and if it doesn't work, then change it. The general rule of thumb suggests that we try to break the targets at the stake, so try holding the gun half way back to the house then look for the target half way between your hold point and the house.Keep your eyes still when you look! Pick a point in the distance that is on or slightly below the flight path of the target and focus on it. When the target passes through your vision your eyes will automatically go to it. When this happens force them to go to the leading edge as you start your mount. Next thing you know the target will be exploding!
 

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Hey sj,

I have seen a LOT of really good skeeters shoot gun-down. I assume they are hunters.

I have never hunted, but shoot gun down/sustained lead. For me, pass through takes too much time.

When I call for the bird(s), I first look for the bird as I bring my muzzle up and mount. Once mounted I have already decided where to pull the trigger.

I use fiber-optic sights, so I can concentrate on the bird while I see the glowing dot in the corner of my eye. I never use the fiber-optic as a real sight.

I also shoot both eyes open, which takes time to learn, but gives me a wider view of the field and the bird(s) - this means less head swinging. I feel shooting this way can improve any shotgun game; skeet, trap, SC, you name it.

I usually shoot IC or LM for skeet. Anything looser takes away velocity from my shot, which are already 12Ga 7/8 oz light loads.

Have fun!
 
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