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gameandfish.about.com/lib...06402a.htmThere are three different types of shotgun barrels through which slugs can be fired: traditional smoothbore (any choke, with or without rifle-type sights); smoothbore with a screw-in rifled choke tube; or full-length rifled. In terms of ammo performance, it's the barrel that counts. The type of shotgun action - auto, pump, bolt or break-open - is not really significant. Nevertheless, the situation is not mix-and-match. For satisfactory performance, the type of slug ammunition you use needs to be matched to the type of barrel you are using.A smooth-bore slug barrel does not spin its projectile, so its range is limited. A smoothbore barrel with a screw-in rifled choke is somewhat better because it will impart at least some stabilizing spin to a departing solid or sabot-design slug, and a full-length-rifled barrel is best (which is why high-power rifles are not smoothbore). In general terms, sabots are intended to be spun. The faster they spin, the better they work, the more stable the flight of the projectile they enclose and the more consistently they separate from the bullet. So, the rule of thumb is essentially this: All types of slug ammo, sabot and non-sabot, provide their best accuracy and the longest effective range when fired in a full-rifle barrel. A smoothbore barrel with rifled choke tube will be somewhat less accurate, and a pure smoothbore offers the least accuracy. You can safely shoot all types of slugs in all types of barrels, but if you use premium-grade sabot ammo in a smoothbore, you're wasting your money, and will likely get less accuracy than with a conventional old Foster-type soft lead slug, since the sabot won't properly separate from the bullet and it actually de-stabilizes the trajectory more than a solid-type load.
 

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Very good info Rick. I would like to add that the reason a Foster-type (rifled slug) has rifling is because smooth-bore barrels do not impart spin on the projectile as you mentioned. Since the smooth-bore does not impart a stabilizing spin on the projectile, the projectile has rifling to impart it's own spin. To fire a rifled slug through a rifled barrel will result in the rifling of the barrel and the slug itelf "fighting" each other.The rifled slug was introduced by the German company RWS in 1898. This slug is the Brenneke, and still available today from Rottweil. In 1936 Winchester introduced the "Foster" slug. The Brenneke is solid lead with a series of lead cards attached to the base, while the Foster slug has a hollow base, not unlike the old Minnie-ball projectiles used during the war between the states.Each variant has a set of angled "Rifling" grooves around it's circumference, and works on the same principle as a dart where the weight is forward of the center of air pressure and makes them fly point-forward. A slug, however, does not have fins to stabilize it's flight. It spins at a very slow rate providing better stabilization than shooting a round ball. (You can throw a football with a good spiral much farther and more accurately than you can the baseball "knuckleball" pitch which has no spin on it.)The sabot (pronounced "say-bo") slug, is an hourglass-shaped solid piece of lead encased in two-halves of a plastic sleeve (the sabot). The hourglass shape makes the slug weight-forward as the other types of slugs. When fired, the projectile exits the muzzle, the plastic halves separate falling just yards downrange while the projectile carries on downrange. The sabot projectile is smaller in diameter than a Brenneke or Foster slug, but weighs close to the same. As the slug itelf has no rifling, it requires stabilization to be imparted via rifling grooves in the barrel.Do not confuse the two, and most certainly do not interchange the two. The advice in Rick's post is right on the money and should be followed at all times. Mike RossLife Member, NAHCMember, National Rifle AssociationMember, Meeker Co. Historical SocietyEdited by: MTRoss at: 1/13/03 10:52:33 am
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

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hi rickdo you know the brand that load's those forster slug's ? . and how do the Brenneke sabot's work without the rifling making contact with the barrel ?. as you might guess I like slug's :D thank's IRISH
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Those are loads for which the recipes will come when you order the slug, also if you open some of the modern slugs, either the Winchester or Federal still use that plan style Fosters....no ribs, or they did years ago, when I used to dig them out of the range backstop.As you know as the ejecta leaves the shell setback occurs at ignition and then there is friction on the wad as it goes down the barrel. With a shotstring you can see that the wad actually stretches in length and the pellets are kept within the shotcup. In a smoothbore there might be some spin inparted from the fins in the barrel, but I would think that once the projectile hits the air that the resistance coming into contact with the fins would begin to impart the spin needed to stabilize the slug.One issue with using some of these rifled slugs in a rifled barrel would be the handedness of the helix....if you place a right hand set slug into a left hand helix barrel, which rifling would play or would it just destabilize the projectile?I'm sure Brenneke has some more information at their website, as I don't use them since they don't pattern well for me. If you click on the slug, the fins indicate according to Brenneke:"that they are compressable and able to travel through any choke". The supersabot looks pretty interesting!!www.brenneke.de/
 
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Can you tell me why there is a warning on my Remington slugs stating to only use a rifled barrel to shoot my rifled slugs? I haven't tried them yet. Thanks.
 

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Birdman,
Re-read the box and type what it says out here. Take the part number off of the box also. I perplexed by your statement.
 

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Hey, if any of you are looking for a fully rifled barrel for an 870 Express, I've got one on ebay with a 1.4-4.5x32 scope in the deal. Starting bid is $140 with a buy-it-now of $180.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3688168167&ssPageName=STRK:MESE:IT

I bought it last year for my second season of hunting because it was more economical than buying a rifle. Now I've got some money saved up and want to sell it to put the money toward a rifle.
 

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MTRoss said:
Very good info Rick. I would like to add that the reason a Foster-type (rifled slug) has rifling is because smooth-bore barrels do not impart spin on the projectile as you mentioned. Since the smooth-bore does not impart a stabilizing spin on the projectile, the projectile has rifling to impart it's own spin. To fire a rifled slug through a rifled barrel will result in the rifling of the barrel and the slug itelf "fighting" each other.Mike RossLife Member, NAHCMember, National Rifle AssociationMember, Meeker Co. Historical SocietyEdited by: MTRoss at: 1/13/03 10:52:33 am
This is sort of a pet peeve of mine and a somewhat common assuption but I'm afraid that although the original designer might have hope those angle grooves on the outside of a foster slug would spin the projectile no one has ever proved they do. If you study the aerodynamic of it then there is almost no chance that those very shallow fins on the side of a foster slug could spin the slug while it is still supersonic. The supersonic shock wave (something the designers could not have understood coming several decades before supersonic flight was understood) coming off the front of a foster slug would create such a low pressure area along the side of the slug that the fins would create almost no rotational moment along the projectiles axis. If you have found a scientific study that proves otherwise I would love to read it.

The grooves do help reduce the amount of barrel contact area and thus reduce friction in the barrel. The aerodynamic stability of a foster slug come from the center of mass being forward of the center of drag and the slug stabilizes just like a badminton shuttlecock. Spin is not a factor in the stability of a foster slug and because of the shape of a foster slug your more likely to spin it to fast and cause it to wobble rather than make it more stable. Try it, shoot some from a smooth bore and then switch to a full rifled barrel. Group size will change little and might even get larger.

mcb
 
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I have a box of Remington Premier CopperSOlid 1oz Hollow Point Magnum Sabot slugs and th ewarning lable on the box says "Warning: This ammunition is designed for use in fully rifled barrels or rifled choke tubes only. Barrel damage or serious injury may occur if this ammunition is fired in fixed or screw-in full, modified or imporved cylinder chokes." This seems to differ from statements previously made that "all slugs can be shot from all barrels." Were those statements wrong? Or is Remington just trying to cover their behinds?
 

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Hastings warn that Remmy solids should not be used in their slug barrels.

Took a small 8pt buck this afternoon with my A5 Mag using a screw in Poly-Choke set on slug and a Brenneke Foster type slug. Took the buck at 50 yards and he went right down.

I usually shoot a Browning A-Bolt but I thought I might try a little squirrel hunting,too. The A5 is my loaner/back up gun.
 

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Sorry, gentlemen, but I must take issue with those that claim that the "ribs" on the foster slugs are to impart spin - this does not happen (it has been proven not to work in tests with high-speed photography). The companies which manufacture slugs with the ribs in a helical pattern are only wishing - or perhaps they do it for looks - but they impart no real stabilizing influence. The ribs are not designed to reduce contact area (to reduce friction), either. The purpose of the ribs is so that, if one was to fire such a slug through a barrel with some amount of choke - the lead would have a place to "flow" as the slug deforms through the choke - rather than potentially splitting the end of the barrel. The name commonly applied to foster - type slugs (i.e., "rifled" slugs) is a total misnomer.
 
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