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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The nice weather coaxed me to go out and shoot some skeet yesterday. I did four rounds and my scores were generally 19 or better. What this means is that the last time I shot skeet (a week ago) my scores were not a fluke. I really am getting better!I only had one box of #9's with me and I started with those and shot 19. Then I switched to Winchester #8 extra-lite target loads. I managed a 20 and a 22 with those, so I guess it was all in my head that I need #9's to shoot good scores. I am also very happy with those extra lite loads. That may be my new shell of choice. My Beretta 391 had no problems cycling those shells.For some odd reason I was having trouble hitting low house on stations #1, 2, and 3. That's where my misses were happening. This hasn't been a problem in the past. I know from other observers that I tend to stop my swing when shooting the low house. Strange that I don't have that problem on the high house. Well I'll figure it out soon enough.All in all in was a beautiful day here in northern Virginia. Sunny and about 81 degrees. Casual ShooterStill dreaming of the day when I am second best.
 

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One of the things to do, especially if you are having a problem with one station or one house, is to just shoot a round of that target presentation. Tell the trapper that you want all low house on station one. Get in the groove by busting them one after the other. There is a fine line between hobby and insanity.
 

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Quote:For some odd reason I was having trouble hitting low house on stations #1, 2, and 3. That's where my misses were happening. This hasn't been a problem in the past. I know from other observers that I tend to stop my swing when shooting the low house. Strange that I don't have that problem on the high house. Well I'll figure it out soon enough.This could easily point to a "mechanical" problem. That could be as simple as foot position not allowing the freedom of motion to the left as well as it does to the right. Adjusting your position on the pad may cure this.Another possibility is physical agility. Is there any reason your body does not rotate left as well as right? Are you rotating your shoulders only and not your entire upper body? Any back problems? Knee problems?Only you can decide, but there is a couple of things you can add to your own self observations the next trip out.
 

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Exactly as stated above it may be mechanical (foot position, etc). Try rotating you body a little more to the left (toward the high high house). Your feet should be parallel and bend the knees a little to help with the flexability thing.Most likely you are riding the target across the field on those three stations and letting your eye go back to the barrel to "check your lead" prior to pulling the trigger, i.e. you have to much time on your hands and you are using the time to screw yourself up. Focus on the leading edge of the target and never look at the barrel - try a few and see is the problem does not go away for you. I know you are holding your barrel about one-third of the way from the low house toward the center stake and focusing your eyes about half way between the barrel and the low house when you call for the bird. Right?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Here I thought I was making good use of my time! :b It probably is a foot position problem. My stance is generally as you say it should be. Probably just needs a little tweaking to allow me to swing more to the left. I am holding my barrel as you described.My eyes..... where am I looking for the target? That's a good question. I don't think I've worked on that. I would guess that I don't have a consistent plan for where to begin looking. I probably look at the house sometimes, and sometimes I look over the barrel (1/3 of the path away from the house). You are saying that with the barrel pointing in the correct direction, I should look 1/2 way between the barrel and the house. That makes sense. Looking at the house probably doesn't help since the bird comes out too fast. I will try this the next time I go out. Thanks.Last weekend I tried shooting skeet with both eyes open. It didn't work well for me. I was doing well with one eye previously. I am predominantly left-handed, but I do some tasks right-handed. Shooting is one of them. From simple testing, it appears that I am right-eye dominant, but you wouldn't know it from this weekend's shooting. :rolleyes Casual ShooterOne gun does it all when one gun is all you have!
 

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My club's president also happens to teach beginning skeet and I learned from him.You must know which is you dominate eye before proceeding, there is various methods of determing this, I'll let you decide the method. If you're right eyed then shoot right handed, left handed if left eyed (it's just easier on the eyes). If possibe learn to shoot with both eyes open it'll make learning easier. (I shoot with one eye and I was slower about developing good shooting habits.)Stance, if right handed point your left foot at the center of station 8. Lean slightly forward with your knees bent with your weight mostly on your left foot. (oppoiste for lefties). Mount, Don't try low gun mount during the learning stage so mount the gun. Get it high on your shoulder, it's easier to bring the stock to your head than it is to bring you head to the stock. Hold the gun tight and firmly place your cheek on the comb of the stock. Keep you head firmly attached to the gun, you eye is the rear sight. You belly should be pointed to the right center at all times because that where you're going to break the high house target. Twist back into the high house (remember is easier to untwist when shooting than to twist up.) Remember your leed, call for the bird, catch it and fire,and remember to keep swinging that gun hit or miss.If you think you might be raising you head take a dollar bill and place it between you cheek and the stock. If you raise your head the dollar will fall and you should give it to the trapper, remember wood to wood. After you've build up muscle memory you can just about shoot on auto-pilot. For experienced shooters when they miss it's usually that they were thinking about the shot instead of just doing it.Have fun, be safe, and good luck.:w
 

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Hey Casual,Don't get too hung up on 9's vs 8's either-just concentrate on shooting. If you still want to try 9's save them for your second or third round. Sometimes it takes a round to get the bugs worked out, so eliminate that then compare 8's and 9's on your next two rounds. You may be too tired by round four to get a good comparison. If you really want to know what they do there is no choice except to head to the patterning board. I doubt if you would have more than 2"-3" greater pattern spread with 9's, but pattern density could be different between 8's and 9's. As long as you aren't using an extremely light (7/8 oz) load it probably won't make any diference at skeet distances.
 
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