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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm getting a new shotgun if I get to Eagle Scout. I'm currently using an old model 12 which doesn't even fit me too well. Right now its a toss up between the mossberg 535 or the 870 express super magnum. I looked on the mossberg website but couldnt find any specs on the 535. I was mainly wondering about the weight. Anyone have any ideas?
Mike
 

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Go with the Mossberg you'll thank yourself later. Don't listen to these folks who bash Mossbergs. 90% of them have never so much as shot one. I'm the proud owner of a 835. Very good gun. The 535 is just an econo model of the 835. I got alto of static when I bought it. many people said it will never stand up. 250 rounds of 3.5in. later I've never looked back. If you wnat to spend more money then you have to that's your choice. But I would not.
 

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Congrats on the soon-to-become Eagle! It is something you will be honored with the rest of your life. Worth every minute of all the paperwork.

I would steer you towards the 870. Utter reliability and it doesn't have the reputation problems that Mossberg has (and those are based upon some fact, not just conjecture). The 870 is going to be a solid performer for years. If you can, get whomever is buying it for you to spring for the Wingmaster. You only make Eagle once, and that's a step up in the 870 department.
 

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I have a Mossberg catalog at home I will post it tomorrow for you.
I would go with a mossberg, I have been shooting them for 20 years.
 

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fin, both guns will suit you for waterfowl hunting. when i started out, i bought the mossberg because i didnt know if i would stick with it and if i wind up having to use it for a paddle, im not too worried about it. of course, i went once and......

ive used my mossy 835 for 4 seasons, and it still holds up fine with no hiccups.

the thing you need to look at is how each gun fits you, that is what will determine how much fun shooting will be for you

for waterfowl, they will both do fine
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all the info. I have less than 2 months before my 18th birthday disqualifies me from eagle. ughh...
I was thinking of the Nova too, but when I shouldered it at a gun shop, it felt too clunky. I know this may anger a good bit of you, but guns that are like something out of buck rogers are not for duck hunting. I'd get the SBE 2 if I had the cash. I can still dream...
Mike
 

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cleric-------------I always knew there was this "500 series vs 870" thing, and "870" guys are always bashing "500's", but I just learned for the first time, just now, that Mossberg has "reputation problems(?)" Based on fact, what are they? I would like to know. Check out "Mossberg Lovers" section. Have you ever bought a new one? I have both, and I lean towards the Mossberg. This reminds me of the old Ford, Chevrolet, and Studebaker thing. The Studebaker was always the best car. The reputation I have heard about is that people have fired thousands of rounds through them for decades with no problems. The "870" guys usually can only come up with the "aluminum alloy receiver" thing, but they can't tell me if they have ever worn one out, or what problems they have had with them that they wouldn't have had on a steel one. Also, the play in the Mossberg slide is engineered to be that way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Does anyone know if the 535 is a first year model? If so, it'd make me more hesistant to get it. I've heard its always best to wait a year after a guns release to buy it so they can work all the kinks out that shooters discover after a year of shootin it.
Mike
 

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Ron - Thanks for the note. You are obviously a great defender of the Mossberg line. If I have learned anything, it is to avoid banter with a fanatic. To quickly answer your question(s), I have never owned one, maybe in the future. I have had two friends who have had problems with 500's. Those are the only two 500's that I spend a lot of time around... hence me being wary. I'm sure many of them perform to spec for many years, otherwise Mossberg would be selling beer mugs.

At any rate, I would suspect that either the 870 or a Mossberg would be a fine waterfowl gun. My waterfowl gun for the time being is a Nova. It does feel a bit plastic (WAIT! It's composite!). However, it has been a great firearm and I would buy another.
 

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Well I can not say if the 535 is a first year gun or not, but it is a newer offering from Mossberg. From what I understand the 535 is a regular 12 ga. barrel on a stronger receiver. Probably the same/similar as the 835. The 835 has the ~10ga. backbored barrel but shoots 12 gauge shells. Both guns accept 3.5inch shells. The backboring is supposed to be for shot patterning reasons, I have still not come up with any answers as to which is better at patterning because 1) I just bought my first shotgun 3 months ago(Mossy 835) it was $275 out the door used but in very nice condition very little wear on it at all. I put 100 rnds thru it and it has done its part when I did mine for busting clays. NO experience with remington except for an old 22 cal rifle 1946 vintage.
One question to ask yourself is what is my primary game animal? That should help your decision.
 

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Sorry I did not gtet back with you on this I had some stuff come up and had to take care if it. I didn;t even have time to look for book.
 

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ron73644 said:
Also, the play in the Mossberg slide is engineered to be that way.
Now maybe this is just me and/or the gun I happen to have. (It probably is) But I've had an 835 Mossberg for quite some time now and I have never noticed the infamous "Mossberg rattle." But like I say it's probably just me.
 

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I put this on another forum. Thought I would share my thoughts here:
I am a Remington trained 870 armorer at our police department. I own two 870's; a 20 gauge wingmaster and a 12 gauge express. For me, the choice came based on the physical location of the safety on the shotguns. I use to own browning pumps and the safety of the 870 is in a different location. I had the unique experience of 2 stress situations at work where I didn't have the muscle memory in finding the safety due to my familiarity with my Brownings. I sold the Brownings and bought my two 870's. I later became an armorer.

I recently broke down my 870 express and compared it to the department's 30 year old wingmasters. The trigger guard on my express appeares to be a composite and the wingmaster was aluminum. But the parts all appeared to be the same. The hammer on my express was not polished on the sides, but it could just be that the 30 year old wingmasters had been polished through years of use. They both have the flextab system though, so the police model had been updated at some point.

The smoothness of the action was very different. The old, well used wingmaster was smooth as butter. The express had a distinct rough spot on the last 1" of rearward cycle. I disassembled it and found the following: The action bars were polished blue on the sides of both guns. The express had a porous surface on the top and bottom of the bars. The ejector on the express was much stiffer than the wingmaster. This is more than likely due to it being much newer and hardly shot. The ejector stuck out from the side of the receiver almost twice as far as the older wingmaster. This made it much stiffer, and when the bolt presses against it, it makes it appear to have a rougher cycle. I cleaned up the action bars and lubricated everything. When I put it back together, it cycled smoother, until the last 1" of travel. I believe this was due to the ejector's stiffness binding against the bolt. I don't consider this to be a flaw. It sure does shuck those shells out!

I have read about some expresses not loading the shells properly. This may be due to the shell latches releasing too quickly, or the carrier needs adjusting. That shouldn't be the case on a new gun, but maybe the quality control people weren't quite awake at Big Green that day. Take some factory marked dummy shells with you to the gun shop and ask to cycle them through the gun you want to buy. Make sure it functions before you buy it.

My father purchased a mossberg 835 from a co-worker of mine. The co-worker abused the gun. He bent the action bar and broke the trigger bar. The gun was sent to Mossberg and they repaired it at no charge. Dad bought the gun and is pleased with it. It features a camo finish, ported barrel, back bored barrel, 10 gauge bore, synthetic stock and sling swivels. For a budget gun, it has a lot of features.

I also had a 835 back in 1998. It had similar features, but no camo finish. It functioned fine, but it didn't fit me. I couldn't get my head down far enough on it. I ended up selling it.

You may find that your physical characteristics dictate what gun you buy. I suggest you go to a store that has the guns your interested in. Take it in your hands, close your eyes and shoulder it. Open your eyes. Do you see the bead? How does it feel?

All three guns are in the similar price range, and are made to compete with each other. They are all well made. Shoulder them and you may find one fits better than the others. Any of the three will be a sound choice. Just my thoughts...
 
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