Shotgun Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A long time ago for me any way, a few years before I was old enough to hunt, my dad, who owns a Model 12 in 16 gauge (1958 or 59 vintage) took it out of it's gun case to clean it up one last time at the end of the season. I was probably 9 or 10 years old sitting there watching him clean the shotgun when he said, "When you're old enough to hunt, this will be yours."

When I was 14 years old, I bought a Beretta A302 in 12 gauge (dad actually bought it and it took most of my snow shoveling and yard mowing money to pay him back) and poured an immense amount of shells through it all through high school. I was about 15 years old before the Model 12 fit good and asked my dad about the gun. At that point, he said I could "use" it but made no mention to being able to "have" the gun. The last time I shot that Model 12 16 gauge was when I was 16 years old.

I joined the Marine Corps and make it back to hunt every other year or so. I usually try to go back later in the fall to hunt pheasant and deer.

This year, I decided to go home for the opening of pheasant season for the first time in 14 years armed with my own model 12 in 16 gauge (1958 or 59 vintage) I bought a couple years ago. I also brought my Browning A5 sweet 16 with me as well.

The gun I took with me to the field the first day was the A5. First off, I consider myself an above average to good shot with a shotgun, but figured it would take a shot or two to "knock the rust off" since I hadn't hunted in 2 years. Anyone that made it to SD pheasant hunting this year can hopefully back me up when I say, "at times, you couldn't load the gun fast enough." Well, I couldn't and couldn't hit much of anything with the A5 either. I was absolutely disgusted with the way I was shooting and normally hit many more than I miss with the A5. The first day, I probably went through 35 or 40 shells with 3 birds to show for it. I also took a good ribbing from my dad and grandfather as well.

The second day, I took MY Model 12 out of the case to shoot it for the first time. At that point, I had not fired a Model 12 since using my dad's 18 years ago. The second day of hunting using the model 12 = 3 shells fired, 3 birds in the bag. The day after that = 4 shells fired, 3 birds.

I could not miss with that old Model 12. I forgot how smooth it swung on a bird, how perfectly it fit. I went back again last weekend and took only my Model 12, 16 gauge that produced excellent results again.

I always was and still am a big Browning A5 fan; one of the best shotguns ever made and I will never sell one even if it means living in a cardboard box. But, after my 18 year hiatus from firing a Model 12, rest assured, I plan on using that gun almost exclusively for many years to come while the Browning "stands watch" in the gun cabinet alongside the Beretta.

I haven't forgot what my dad said to me about his Model 12, but now I understand why he did not give it to me...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
607 Posts
what choke's the model 12? Maybe it's a little more open.

I remember the first time I used my A-5 on the 5 stand. I was so mad afterwards I could have set it in the safe and never used it again, but I figured out later (I was young then) that I was using the wrong choke. I stuck in a more open choke and hit about twice as much as I did the last time out. That full choke dusted the clays, but you had to be right on with it!

Matt
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,359 Posts
IMO the Browning A-5 chokes are on the tight side. I have a 1914 A-5 in full that I swear has a shot string that lets the pellets out one at a time.

I was amazed the first time I shot trap with it, it was grinding birds no matter how far out you let them get.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Tijeras_Slim said:
IMO the Browning A-5 chokes are on the tight side. I have a 1914 A-5 in full that I swear has a shot string that lets the pellets out one at a time.

I was amazed the first time I shot trap with it, it was grinding birds no matter how far out you let them get.
Yes, the old A-5 fixed chokes are tight! In 1969 when I was 16, my dad bought me a new A-5 as my first "good" shotgun.

I remember the owner of the gun shop recommended a "Modified" choke instead of a full because of this. My dad also purchased a skeet barrel for it at the same time. It turned out that I used that barrel the most.

Five years ago I gave it to my son. I like the Model 12 since it hits what I shoot at much better.

Lock and Load! :) :)
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top