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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Am in the market for a new 12 gauge shotgun, will be used for trap/sporting and pheasants. Am deciding between over/under or auto. (Not interested in a pump, with todays autos I am not worried about autos fowling)Which do you prefer and why? I need help making up my mind.Thinking the o/u is nice because its lighter. At the same time think the auto is nicer for shooting sporting clays cause it will have less recoil. (At most I will only ever shoot 50 clays at a time, would be lucky to shoot 100 clays a month)Thoughts?
 

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The o/u has more of a sportsman feel in that you are limited to two shots, more noble if you want.Also more reliable and, dare i say, nicer looking.Also a choice of two chokes instead of one.The recoil is a problem only when shooting lots and using powerfull loads.You will be happy with whatever you choose....also check this article out:http://www.briley.com/WhyOUs.html Edited by: dks at: 1/7/03 2:58:47 pm
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Now that was a good post! Thank you very much for the link. I am still willing to listen to others.
 

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i like an auto. i personally don't own an over and under because i find them kind of cumbersome. i just shoot a auto better. plus if you look at a benelli or a beretta auto loader you can find a gun that weighs about or less than seven pounds especially the benelli. also you have to consider price. you are going to spend more for an o/u. i wouldn't worry about recoil or anything like that. i think you should go and shoot as many different guns as you can and buy the one you like the most. however the o/u is abig advantage with the second shot and a second choke. also if you get a 12 gauge that is chambered for 3 1/2'' shells you can shoot the standard 2 3/4 and not have to worry about it cycling which is a big bonus. this really is a big decision. happy hunting!
 
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consider what you will be doing with it, your price range and your preferances. if you will be hunting mostly then highly consider a synthetic auto (benelli m-1, beretta 391) these are on the lighter side which is nice for upland hunting. the remington 11-87 and browning gold are a bit heavier but very lith kickers. I own a beretta ultralight and it beats the crap out of you for clays. if you want one gun for both try to stay around the 6.75-7.5lb range this will keep the beatings to a minimum and is still decent to carry. also consiter a sporting O/U I have one of those in a beretta 686 E and it shoots like a dream. but the bottum line is if you can shoot with it.
 

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Since your original post says the use will be trap and sporting clays, I'd think (not being a devotee of either) that you'd have to be ruled by a choice that is a trap gun first, clays second and pheasant third. I say this because pheasant are relatively easy shooting, expecially if they are holding for the dogs, while trap (correct me if I am wrong guys) is usually shot with a somehat more specialized firearm. A wide range of shotguns would be fine for the pheasants but some of them might not be such hot trap guns.
 

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I was also trying to decide on an semi auto and an over under. I went with a Remington 11-87 semi. I went with this gun for a few reasons. First, O/U's cost more. This was my first gun and wasnt sure whether I would use it much and just how much I would like trap/skeet etc. So I didnt want to put out lots O $$$ for my first shotgun.
I also like having the 3rd shot. If for some reason u miss/cripple a bird with the first 2 shots u can stick a 3 inch magnum in for the extra reach and power.
I am at the point where I am starting to look for a 2nd gun. I would love and O/U but think I might get a Remington 870 for duck hunting with synthetic stock. My 11-87 is a walnut stock in a hi-gloss finish and I dont really want to get in it the mud and water.
Which ever u go with u will be happy with both.
 

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Hey GSP, that's a nice looking shorthair--what's his or her name? I started upland hunting with 'em years ago! Every time I see one it brings back fond memories!
 
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Get the automatic. If you get the O/U you will be spoiled and not have anything to look forward to. Seriously, the O/U is not worth the $$$ unless you are ready for it. They generally do cost more but are worth it under the right circumstances.

I think you would be happy with a field gun or a sporting gun. I would NOT suggest a trap gun since they are designed to shoot high (so you can look at the pigeon). Field guns have a tendency to be shorter 26-28 inch barrels are common since weight is a factor. Trap/Sporting guns tend to have longer barrels and be heavier.

I am a hunter first and a clay pigeon shooter on occasion. I have a light 12 gauge in 28" and I love it. If recoil is a problem then I am having an awesome day hunting. My buddy shoots a 26" in 20 gauge (and I am jealous).
 

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I had a Browning Citori 12 gauge for 25 years. For hunting it is heavy. Also depends on how much walking you are going to do if hunting. I got into rabbit hunting with a guy who has great rabbit dogs...carried the citori the first morning and had to switch guns by noon. I purchased the Franchi 612 semi-auto shotgun about 2 months ago. It is light and can be carried all day. I really like the Franchi...simple design...gas operated...the gas piston and recoil spring is in the forearm for easy take down and cleaning. You can switch the gas piston from light to heavy loads. It has cycled everything that I have fed it...from light 1oz reloads to the 3" magnum Turkey loads without a single hiccup. It will be baptized on a 9-1-03 Dove hunt. For skeet must people prefer an over and under. For Sporting Clays an over and under would be nice because for the second shot you can use a different choke. All depends on what you are going to use the gun for. For hunting where you will be doing a lot of walking I went with the light semi-auto.
 

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Hunting guns are meant to be carried a lot, and shot a little - clays guns are meant to be carried a little and shot a lot.

No matter what you get, it must be a good fit, or you won't hit diddly-squat, and that's no fun. Borrow a few guns from your hunting buddies, or even folks at the gun club - you'd be surprised at how many guys will let you shoot a round with their gun if you're thinking of buying one. Then shoot a round of low-gun skeet - that's the quickest way to evaluate your ability to hunt with a gun.

If the primary purpose is going to be hunting, I'd consider a pump or an autoloader rather than an o/u - I have both, and I've tried the o/u guns in the field - they were noticeably heavier at the end of the day, and the 2-choke advantage didn't prove to be worth the weight. Now, I just use a 12 or 20 pump for hunting, and leave the 12 & 20 o/u for the clay games.
 

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Okie here's where my .02 comes in...

I personally would go fer the O/U. I find it to be more of a traditional type shotgun for pheasant hunting and clays/trap/skeet. I mean all you really need is 2 shots. Well you should only hit it with 2 shots. But hey, there is nothing wrong with triples from 3 chamber loaded shotguns. I personally do not like autos for the reputation they have around here for constant jamming in cold winter times. Im a pump person, but thas just me. I mean hey, even a sidexside would be excellent choice. One way or antoher if you want quality and good handling in the field or club range, yas still gona pay a bright noticable-from-10-miles-away penny. For a O/U that is. You can find a variaty of autos from 200$ on up in good hopes. I wouldn't really trust 2nd hand autos, but then again......thas jsut me :):)

Jamie
 

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Love the dog pic... now if she only had a black nose, long golden hair, and big, brown eyes....

It's been my experience over many years that autoloaders that are clean and properly maintained work just fine alll the time.

Those with worn-out o-rings or those that are full of soot and crud are expensive single shots.
 
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