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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thinking about taking the plunge on one of these. Hunting and some clays for practice (for hunting), figure they've been out for a while, anybody regret buying one. Looking at the straight stock 28 inch 20GA. Think the 20 is the only one offered as of yet but that's what I would get anyway. A shop about an hour away has one in 30 inch might have to go and check it out.
 

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I bought one in the target configuration with 28" barrels and have used it for sporting clays events for the last two years. I love the gun. The quality of the metal finishes and the wood grade are excellent. I do have two regrets: it has a single trigger. I normally shoot vintage side by sides but the lack of low pressure shells caused me to buy the Autumn. I really like double triggers though which weren't available on the early version. They are now as a $469.00 option.
Second, the chokes are way overpriced in my opinion. And they don't have a skeet 1 and skeet 2 option. They are numbered 0/10, 2/10, 5/10, 7/10 and 9/10 ( I assume Cylinder, IC, Mod, IM and Full). There aren't any after market options either.
I did get to handle a 30" barrel english stock, double trigger Autumn at a shoot last month. It felt very nice.
Final note, there aren't a lot of options for a modern side by side besides Fausti and CSMC. I have handled the Fausti option and it is very plain compared to the Autumn. CSMC is making some versions of a basic side by side in 28 gauge and 16 gauge too as options. I prefer 16 gauge for hunting but it's not practical as a clays gun unless you reload.
Good luck with your decision.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks. Most of what I read about them are positive. I shouldered a few 471 silverhawks in the past and they just didn't fit me well, think the drop was too shallow. The 5 year warranty through CG is also a plus vs buying something vintage.
 

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Thanks. Most of what I read about them are positive. I shouldered a few 471 silverhawks in the past and they just didn't fit me well, think the drop was too shallow. The 5 year warranty through CG is also a plus vs buying something vintage.
I bought one exactly like you indicate, i.e. 28 inch, straight grip. I sold it before firing it, because it came in at 6 lbs 5 oz. I was hoping for no more than 6 lbs but FABARM was wrong in what they said I should expect for that configuration. FABARM is still listing the weights as being from 5 lbs 9 oz to 6 lbs 2 oz, I sure would like to see that 5 lb 9 oz one!

Target shooters like heavy guns, but I was trying for a field gun and know that more than 6 lbs is not right for me to carry all day after grouse or wild quail. This gun also had a slight weight forward bias which many favor but I do not in a field gun.

I also was not fond of the obvious flaring at the muzzles to accommodate the screw chokes. I found it quite distracting but I am sure it is just something a person gets used to after use. I don't think I ever would have gotten used to it. No reviewers even mentioned that distracting feature.

In addition the split under lumps system that is used, I am sure is quite strong, but it makes the gun a bit wider throughout. It certainly was not the svelte, 6 lb. double for field use that I wanted. In my mind it was to be sold after only 15 seconds of handling. So I sold before firing, because a) I knew I did not want to keep it and b) was trying to minimize my hit on the price.

On the positive side, mine had some above average figure to the wood and was a very nicely finished gun. Close metal to wood seams and outstanding case colors plus bluing. It also has what I term a "clean breech face". Meaning it does not have any cross bolts or barrel extensions that can get in the way of quickly reloading. I like that in my field guns.

I think the Autumn with 30 inch barrels would be a fine SC gun for those SXS events.

I simply should have handled one before buying and then none of the "negatives for me" areas that I describe would have been a surprise. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Oyeme, yes the weight is a criticism I see mentioned and that is one of the things holding me back on this one. I'll probably wait a while and consider some other options.......................or just use what's in the safe now!
 

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My unsolicited recommendation is to handle one and then YOU decide. I am an old marshmallow, so I need lighter weight but many others may not.

From past experience, I should have known that almost all 3 inch chambered 20 gauges doubles are going to weigh around 6 lbs 6 oz. IMO it's just part of making the guns robust enough for the magnum payloads. That's why I contacted the maker directly and asked before buying.

Their response was that in that configuration, it should be a maximum of 6 lbs and closer to the 5 lbs. 9 oz. they advertise.

I too would have preferred double triggers in a field gun but they were not yet available. Don't just go by what I said. Go handle one. You may like it! Good luck!
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'm okay with the single trigger, but tore bicep of my forearm holding arm so weight to carry is a concern now, but I still do pretty good, that arm just weaker and gets tired quicker. But you're right should handle one first.
 

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Rizzini and Beretta are building some beautiful side by sides for not a lot more money than the Fabarm.
I was searching in my brain for Rizzini. I have also handled a Rizzini. Very nice gun. The Autumn in my opinion is just a nicer looking shotgun than the others. I shoot it pretty well too. If I was buying a field gun, I would put appearance lower on my list of requirements. Also, I prefer an over under for pheasants and grouse. I shoot a 16 gauge Citori and a 16 gauge Marlin 90 primarily. They are of course heavier than the Autumn.
 

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I have a 30" pistol grip, single trigger and I love it. Was pretty stiff out of the box. There is a rumor that a 28 gauge is in the works, but like I said, it is only a rumor. Like someone mentioned, double triggers are now an option. When they came out, MSRP was right at 4000, and now its gone up 300-400 depending where you are looking. My only criticism is the case it came in...just seems a bit cheesy. I purchased mine for 3600 new and I would absolutely purchase it again. Was concerned if I would like the swamped rib, but the gun fits well and the sight picture is perfect.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Yes price I see is generally about 4400 for single trigger ones, which is not a small "investment" for me. But the older I get the more I think it's time to get some better toys I would not have bought 20 years ago. As Randy Newberg from Fresh Tracks says "You'll run out of health before you run out of money" Not sure about that but probably true for a lot of people.
 

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Yes price I see is generally about 4400 for single trigger ones, which is not a small "investment" for me. But the older I get the more I think it's time to get some better toys I would not have bought 20 years ago. As Randy Newberg from Fresh Tracks says "You'll run out of health before you run out of money" Not sure about that but probably true for a lot of people.
I had the Dickenson Plantation model recommended to me by Bruce Buck. He knows his shotguns.


I don't need side plates on a gun so I would be inclined to get the less expensive Estate model. Unfortunately, or maybe purposely, they don't list any weight for their guns. Good luck!

 

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Not knocking Dickinson but several years ago I bought a 28 ga 30”. The right barrel shot high right about 18-24” at 20 yards. Way off !!! They replaced it. The second gun lost all its wood finish in one day hunting in foggy damp conditions and every time I’d fire both barrels consecutively the forend latch would come loose. They offered to redo it but I was done. Got a refund from Cabelas after talking to the store manager. I own a FAIR Iside 20 ga 28”. I’ve owned many doubles in my life including a few graded American guns as well as some nice English and German guns. I can honestly say it’s the best sxs I’ve ever owned. You need to spend north of $5k to get a gun as well made. Otherwise you’re just getting nicer wood and engraving. At the price you’re looking to spend you could buy a 20 and 28, or whatever. A 12 and 16, or however you see the need/want.
 

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I’d look real hard at the FAIR Iside. Just as good a gun at less than half the price .
Also note that the Iside comes in several levels of fanciness from Iside basic to their Iside Prestige. You can get single or double triggers, ejectors or extractors. You can even get custom engraving like I did on my Jubilee Prestige O/U (laser engraved picture of my dogs Bruno and Razor):

 

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This gun also had a slight weight forward bias which many favor but I do not in a field gun.

I also was not fond of the obvious flaring at the muzzles to accommodate the screw chokes.
Sounds like a gun that would benefit greatly from a fixed-choke option.
 

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Sounds like a gun that would benefit greatly from a fixed-choke option.
In my opinion, absolutely! However, I understand the screw choke option as a "must have" nowadays in order to ever sell a new gun. Only old timers like me, would ever consider buying or using a fixed choke gun!

On the weight, I saw where Tom Sternal's brief review of this gun made for Orvis indicated the weight correctly at 6 1/2 lbs. Again, I think that weight is going to be "standard" in 3 inch chambered 20 gauge doubles and I should have known better.

The "flared muzzles" is not anything I have seen in recent years, but then I have not bought any newly designed double guns. I am most surprised that none of the reviewers mentioned that distracting feature. Again, others may be o.k. with it and overall the gun is a very finely finished gun; but just did not fit the light weight upland double that I wanted or envisioned.

I don't want to dissuade anyone from buying one but just recommend they handle it first.
 

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In my opinion, absolutely! However, I understand the screw choke option as a "must have" nowadays in order to ever sell a new gun. Only old timers like me, would ever consider buying or using a fixed choke gun!
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The "flared muzzles" is not anything I have seen in recent years, but then I have not bought any newly designed double guns.
I thought fixed chokes were back en vouge. I know Caesar is offering and selling fixed choke “Invictus” models so they should be able to pull it off with the Fabarm Autumn. SxS guns are a niche of buyers that would go for it, I believe.

My Fabarm L4S has a very notable flare at the last few inches of barrel, but I don’t care on an auto loading field gun. Especially if that’s what it takes to keep the weight down.
 
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