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On the Mossberg website they say "Ported barrels on selected models for pattern and recoil control", now i could understand how it would reduce recoil, but in what way would it improve the pattern.
 

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It doesn't. It's advertising.

Porting doesn't reduce recoil, either. It might reduce muzzle flip but not recoil.
 

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Porting a shotgun barrel is sort of like Santa Claus. If you believe in it, porting can solve all of your shooting problems.
 

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The idea is that less gas coming out out the end of the barrel
there by reducing recoil. Less gas also means no gas traveling through and disrupting the flight of the buckshot. I have no hard and fast research proving it does or does not work, The 12
gauge has relatively low gas pressure in the scheme of things. I have a ported barell. I do think it keeps muzzle climb down. but that is treating a symptom not the disease.
 

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Barrel porting does not reduce free recoil, period. What barrel porting does is to redirect a small portion of the gas UPWARD, thereby counteracting the upward rotation of the gun. This action will have a tendency to reduce PERCEIVED recoil. This reduction in perceived recoil is difficult to prove since perceived recoil varies between shooters, but it does exist. Proper gun fit will have the same effect. (Ever wonder why those old time shotguns seemed to kick like a mule? Check out their stock dimensions in comparison to a modern gun.)

Whether porting works for you or not is entirely up to you. I do not like ported guns as they are a real pain to clean and they tend to be loud (if you have any concern for your squad mates).

That said, I have absolutely no idea how they could possibly control pattern.

Frank
 

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It seems that this subject gets beaten to death every couple months on this forum. Most of the folks here think porting is a waste of money, but a fair number think it works. The only thing that is generally agreed upon is that a ported gun is a pain in the you-know-what to those on either side of the shooter.
 

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First let me say I don't like ported shotguns, but to say that ports do not reduce recoil is wrong. Any time part of the ejecta to directed up(or down or etc) the amount of the rearward recoil is reduced. It may be insignificant, but there is some reduction because there is less ejecta going forward.
 

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pop-a-cap said:
but to say that ports do not reduce recoil is wrong.
as was said, this gets beat to death here----so i will only offer this---figur the recoil pulse in milliseconds, which is what is felt by the shooter----the pulse is almost flatlined by the time the wad reaches the ports.
 

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pop-a-cap said:
First let me say I don't like ported shotguns, but to say that ports do not reduce recoil is wrong. Any time part of the ejecta to directed up(or down or etc) the amount of the rearward recoil is reduced. It may be insignificant, but there is some reduction because there is less ejecta going forward.
Well, if you buy into that argument, then you must also believe that if the porting reduces the gas volume and pressure behind the shot charge, then it must also reduce the velocity of that charge. My belief is that porting of a barrel reduces BOTH the muzzle rise and the muzzle velocity, but both reductions are so insignificant as to be considered ZERO for all practical purposes.
 

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Take 2 identical guns, one ported, one not.

Put good ear protection an a blindfold on the shooter, let him or her, fire both guns.

If that person can tell the difference with regularity, I'll kiss your butt in the town square an give you 30 minutes to draw a crowd first.

In other words, it ain't gonna happen.
 

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According to Tom Roster, he clearly states that porting does not reduce recoil at all, period. He has been testing shotguns and loads for over 30 years, I'll trust his conclusions.
 

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Chris Ferres said:
According to Tom Roster, he clearly states that porting does not reduce recoil at all, period. He has been testing shotguns and loads for over 30 years, I'll trust his conclusions.
This statement is as incorrect as saying that it does reduce recoil! You need a better understanding of exactly is going on. Since a portion of the gases are bled off and redirected upward, if you carried the calculation to the nth degree, you would positively see some reduction in actual recoil. The calculation is based on the mass of ALL ejecta, including the gases. Will a shooter notice a differrence based on this? I rather doubt it, no more than he would notice a difference in recoil due to humidity causing the wood to weigh more (and it does, when carried to the nth degree).

However, the fact that these gasses impart a certain amount of force to the dynamic of the gun and that ports are always located on the top half of the barrel (ever see ports on the bottom? There is a good reason why), This force serves to counter act the normal upward rotation of a gun when fired. This rotation is due to the difference in the plane of the barrel and the plane of support, i.e. the moment produced by the force of recoil and the couple (distance between the center of gravity and the axis of the barrels). This upward acceleration is further complicated by the pitch of the stock against the shoulder. All of this figures in on perceived recoil.

Try this experiment. Take two guns, both identical weight, but very different stock dimensions, and fire two identical rounds. I guarrantee that the stock with more drop will "kick" more.

It's not always just about force over time. How the force is applied has a lot to do with things.

Frank
 

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I'm not sure about reduction in felt recoil, but I do believe that ported guns are LOUDER than a non-ported counterpart. At least this is my impression based upon hunting in a blind with another hunter that had a ported gun.

I have a mossburg 695 I picked up cheap on a Gander Mountain closeout. It has a ported barrel and quite frankly I don't think it makes a difference in my shooting ability or accuracy.
 

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Frank, you're wasting your time. You are using simple laws of physics and scientific fact to explain away hearsay, rumors and old wives tales.

Unfortunately, your explanation is clear, concise, and makes perfect sense. The angle of the dangle of the stock was excellent. Stock profiles and re-direction of applied forces, et al. I think what we're looking at is "perceived recoil" and that's all that matters to us shooters.

Copterdrvr
 

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Just to throw a new monkey wrench in. Why are so many extended chokes ported ALL THE WAY AROUND? What advantage does this offer and why would they do it if it didn't offer some advantage? I must admit that I may have been bamboozled because for whatever reason I wouldn't dream of shooting my 3.5" Mossberg 835 and the 0.67 turkey choke without the porting on the choke. I guess I have bought in hook line and sinker.
 

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Well, here's an example for you. The U.S. military has a 50 calibre sniper rifle. The gun has a very large muzzle brake on the end of the barrel.

The muzzle brake was designed and implemented because the rifle was a horrible beast to fire. After the installation of the muzzle brake-no problem to fire.

The choke tube with the cuts all the way around works on the same principle as the muzzle brake by re-directing the gasses coming out the muzzle.

Copterdrvr
 

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copterdrvr said:
The choke tube with the cuts all the way around works on the same principle as the muzzle brake by re-directing the gasses coming out the muzzle.
Not!

Ported choke tubes are nothing like the muzzle brake on a .50 sniper rifle or a field artillery piece.
 

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Seamus O'Caiside said:
copterdrvr said:
The choke tube with the cuts all the way around works on the same principle as the muzzle brake by re-directing the gasses coming out the muzzle.
Not!

Ported choke tubes are nothing like the muzzle brake on a .50 sniper rifle or a field artillery piece.
Ditto.

Look at the muzzle brake in the pic below (no, that's not me or anyone I know). See all the surface area in that brake? That material is what allows the brake to work. The gas acts against that material.



Where is the corresponding material on a shotgun choke? The wall of the choke is much too thin to allow the ports to work as a brake.
 
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