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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking for advice from CG owners....

My first (and only so far) O/u is a 28 inch CG field model. Long story short, I was not as well-informed as I should have been when I bought the gun for clays and the salesman convinced me that shorter and lighter would be better because I'd be carrying it around all day! It has some stock modifications because I'm lefty and needed LOP adjustments, and the butt angled a bit etc. That said, I'm not even sure those are right because I consistently shoot over the top of targets.

I was at the Seafood Blast over the weekend and a squad mate suggested that maybe I should get longer barrels rather than sell it and get a proper clays gun. So I visited the CG trailer and they said I can buy a set of 32 inch barrels for somewhere around $2000 and they could add some weight in the stock to get it closer to 8 lbs. It's around 7 now and I start to appreciate the kick around 200 rounds.

Let's assume the stock adjustments are correct and there's some technique reason I always shoot over the top. {FWIW, the Zoli rep said CGs are known to shoot high. Not sure if that's true or just bluster}

Does the "buy new barrels" plan make sense or am I just putting lipstick on a pig? In other words, will longer barrels change this field gun into a clays gun?

For example, I don't know what the differences are, if any, between the CG field stock and the sporting stock to make one more suitable for sporting clays. Having test drove a 32 inch barreled gun at the shoot, I can see the pointing and swinging advantages the longer tubes have over the short tubed gun I'm using.

What would you do...?
 

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What would I do if in your situation? Something to consider: keep the field gun for field use and throw in another $1000 (to the $2000 you will spend on barrels) and add a lightly used sporting CG to the herd. You can find very nice Summit Sportings or Summit Ascents (my favorite CG configuration) in the $3K range.
 

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I would agree with Diddle that a second, separate sporting gun would be the my choice; however before you make a decision you should call CGUSA and discuss your situation with one of their staff, they will be able to advise you of all your options. Also, the Zoli rep is full of it, CGs shoot where they are set up to shoot, just like all quality shotguns. I have a 12 gauge sporting and a 3 barrel sub gauge sporting set, all shoot exactly where they are supposed to.
 

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This is the second time I've seen a Zoli rep through shade on CG (My trip to San Antonio was the first). Zoli must be worried. MAJ
 

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I would buy a dedicated clays gun.
 

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Go for a dedicated clays gun. Either sell the field gun or go for broke and buy new.
I shoot my clays gun for all venues, no dedicated gun for each. CG has a good reputation and great service...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Diddle said:
What would I do if in your situation? Something to consider: keep the field gun for field use and throw in another $1000 (to the $2000 you will spend on barrels) and add a lightly used sporting CG to the herd. You can find very nice Summit Sportings or Summit Ascents (my favorite CG configuration) in the $3K range.
Ok, perhaps this is a naive question from someone shopping for an expensive gun:

Why the Ascent, which is set up 50/50, versus a standard sporting which is I suppose set up for 60/40 (website doesn't say)?

I ask because this never came up when I bought my field gun and worked with a fitter. So I take this to mean I missed out on a discussion about POI that I should've had, but didn't.
 

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Buy the one that fits/feels best to you. The Ascent willl be close to a pound heavier than the standard sporting ... about the same as a Krieghoff Sporting. Only you can decide what is best for you. I like the extra weight. You can adjust POI (within reason) with either gun as long as you have the adjustable comb (which I highly recommend). My two Sportings and Ascent shoot to about 60/40 as I have them set up.
 

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Whatever you do - don't go back to the place where you bought the first one!

Seriously - you should call CG and talk to someone knowledgeable. And tell them this story and ask them where to go.

They should pull their guns from the place you bought your first one. And maybe offer you a deal on a new one.

Nothing wrong with field guns and I love them for bird hunting. But for a guy looking for a mostly dedicated clays gun, to get that kind of advice and then ON TOP OF THAT to go through the expense and trouble of fitting a gun that is not the best model for the sport is almost criminal.

That's the kind of advice I'd expect from some of the self-styled pompous "experts" I've met at certain Dicks's, Bass Pro's or Cabelas. But NOT what I'd expect from a CG dealer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
VTHokiesDuckHunter said:
Whatever you do - don't go back to the place where you bought the first one!....

That's the kind of advice I'd expect from some of the self-styled pompous "experts" I've met at certain Dicks's, Bass Pro's or Cabelas. But NOT what I'd expect from a CG dealer.
Yes, and you are getting warmer, but think "more exclusive" than Dick's! I think it was the specific salesman, looking to sell something to a novice in a particular price range and maybe clear out inventory on field guns from the mothership. And I indirectly (without giving a specific name--shame on me) gave feedback to the mothership just this past week that its salesman put me in the wrong type of gun.....and their response was, "well now you have a gun to bird hunt with!"

Actually, I did mention to this to the CG mobile team last month at M&M and their response was "that's a top quality salesman you dealt with, I wouldn't go back to him again." I intend to give them a call before I make my next purchase decision, if I choose to go CG again.

I'm going to make lemonade with the situation and try my hand at birding with it next season. Today's mission is to check out a couple of "local" (2 hour drive) CG dealers and see what they have to offer and how they interact with customers. I know that I can always buy from a place like Pacific Sporting etc and go to the factory for a fit, but that seems like a lot of effort; it should be easier!
 

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Bob -- The chance that you will find a dealer that stocks LH CG's is extremely low. So, about all you will be able to do is see the various models somewhere. If you are going to take a "trip" to look at guns, I'd travel down to upper Maryland and arrange (in advance) to meet one of the local dealers at the CG location. You will be able to pick the model, wood and have it fit (for free) while you are there. Then arrange payment and shipping with the dealer. You will be making a $4-7K investment. It would be to your advantage to do it, in my opinion. Feel free to PM me and I will share my opinion on some of the local dealers that may help you. Diddle
 

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I got into clay shooting just 4 years ago and it's been a learning experience. I started out with a field model as well, a 28", 28 gauge, Magnus because I was concerned with recoil having a bum shoulder. It's ok for skeet but it didn't fell quite right. Learning that they make 7/8 oz 12 gauge target loads, I decided to try a 12 gauge sporting. High ribbed guns are the rage with the guys I shoot skeet with, so I bought a 32" Summit Ascent. Nice gun, nicely balanced and not any heavier than other sporting models I've tried, but I could not get used to the sight picture. Give me a flat rib any day.

I sold it and got a 32" Maxum Sporting. Much better! Then I came across a 30" Invictus Sporting online at a price that I couldn't pass up. Of the 2, the 30" is better balanced for me and is my go to gun. This whole thing about longer barrels is a marketing gimmick. 20 years ago, 28" was the rage. Bottom line, try both lengths and buy the one you feel is best balanced in your hands.

Try them out locally but when you decide what you want......August Crocker Guns. He carries lefties regularly. I bought all 3 12 gauges on line from him. Why? You see what exactly you are buying and the wood on his selections is a grade above what you'd find in a local store. He's very knowledgable and will answer any questions you may have. But then again, the ultimate trip would be to go to Guerini's facility if possible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks everyone for the input.

Barrel swap is out. Doesn't make sense.

As for the length issue, two instructors mentioned "You should probably buy a clays gun or look into longer barrels." So there's that!

Not sure I'm going to stay with CG for this purchase. Two dealers (who sell other brands and CG) asked why I felt I needed a $4k+ gun at my experience level. And I think there's something to that, with only a year plus under my belt. They are nice guns but at the end of the day it's a tool to break things with and I haven't come close to mastering the tool to the point I should buy something that expensive. Maybe I'll think differently in a few days but my current state of mind is less $$ gun, more coaching and practice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
+1. Yup. Keep field gun for field use. I wanted to try hunting this season anyway and it turns out that it's not cheap!

Find either new or used gun in $2k range and shoot it for a few seasons before moving up in price range.
 

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Bobonli said:
Two dealers (who sell other brands and CG) asked why I felt I needed a $4k+ gun at my experience level. And I think there's something to that
I don't.

You need to filter what you're told. The people who told you so, what is their competitive shooting experience? How many rounds do they put through a shotgun in a year? Gun dealers, as well as gunsmiths, range from subject matter experts to outright charlatans.

I've been a competitive rifleman for years (since 2000 or so) and I clearly understand the value of buying the absolute best one can afford from day one. When I transitioned to sporting clays in 2015 I bought as much gun as I could afford which was a 686 Sporting. And if I could have afforded a Kolar or a Perazzi I would have bought one from the get go.

If I had $4K - $5K to spend, I'd call Pacific Sporting Arms and ask about their line of Salvinelli guns. They are Perazzi MX-12 near clones, supposedly built like a brick outhouse, start just under $5K, and include a custom stock and forend for that price. He also sells Zoli as well.
 

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All guns go bang, but not all guns will fit you off the rack, regardless of price. Not everybody can fit into a size 9 shoe. It's fit that counts, not the name or the price, that will make you a better shooter. I started out with a semi-auto and for 2 years tried the O/U guns of guys I shot with. Most guys will be happy to let you try theirs so they can tell you about them. "Try on" as many as you can and fire them. Most O/U 12's were not fun on my shoulder without a mechanical recoil system, some worse than others. Some light 20's were rather brutal but poor fit was part of it. The only one that actually fit and was comfortable to shoot was a Guerini Sporting. That's why I became a fan, plus the lifetime warranty and tune ups.

Try to find a model that fits and then go online to buy it used. Why take the hit on depreciation? I've seen a few guys who belonged to the "gun of the month club". They'd buy a new gun, shoot it a few weeks, complain it beat the crap out of them or couldn't hit anything with it and then sell it to buy a different brand. Fit, fit, fit. Are you willing and/or able to pay for modifications to make it fit? Adjustable comb, adjustable butt plate, maybe a mechanical recoil system hanging out the back?

Don't be taken in with the necessity of an extra long barrel. It's balance in your hand that counts. You don't want to carry around something that feels like an I beam at the end of the day. Bruce Buck's "Shotgun Report" has a wealth of knowledge and is a humorous read.
https://shotgunreport.com/2014/10/31/looong-barrels/

But you're just starting out, take your time. Your 1st gun probably won't be your last. Some guys are in a constant quest for the perfect gun. This sport is addictive. Not only in the shooting itself but you can get seduced into collecting shotguns, just because.... As one old timer said, if you know how many shotguns you have, you don't have enough.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Sobrepuesta said:
Bobonli said:
Two dealers (who sell other brands and CG) asked why I felt I needed a $4k+ gun at my experience level. And I think there's something to that
I don't.

You need to filter what you're told. The people who told you so, what is their competitive shooting experience? How many rounds do they put through a shotgun in a year? Gun dealers, as well as gunsmiths, range from subject matter experts to outright charlatans.

I've been a competitive rifleman for years (since 2000 or so) and I clearly understand the value of buying the absolute best one can afford from day one. When I transitioned to sporting clays in 2015 I bought as much gun as I could afford which was a 686 Sporting. And if I could have afforded a Kolar or a Perazzi I would have bought one from the get go.

If I had $4K - $5K to spend, I'd call Pacific Sporting Arms and ask about their line of Salvinelli guns. They are Perazzi MX-12 near clones, supposedly built like a brick outhouse, start just under $5K, and include a custom stock and forend for that price. He also sells Zoli as well.
Both are professional sporting clays coaches one a men's national champ and the other a regional champ. If both of them mentioned it then I will take their advice into consideration since I work with them and they've seen me shoot. Yes the suggestion would have different significance if they weren't pros or had never seen me shoot my current gun.

And whether or not I have the cash to buy an expensive gun doesn't mean I should buy one at this stage and with my abilities. But I understand the other point of view: that if you buy the best you have room to grow into it.
 
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