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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi folks, I own a Beretta O/U with a vented rib and one bead. I am a novice, owned this shotgun for three or so years, and probably only go through less than 200 rounds a year in either trap, or on our land with a thrower. I am still not confident that I know exactly where I am supposed to place the bead relative to the target. Just using my logic, I would think that, assuming I am looking down the barrel at a perfect allignment (I would think this would suggest I am seeing no rib whatsoever, cheek on the stock, and just seeing the bead...) that if the bead were directly in front of the target - so that the bead was blocking the target.....I would still be aiming slightly high of the true center.

I understand I should be using targets to see how my specific shotgun patterns with my sighting, but I guess I am interested at what others do for positioning the bead relative to the target.

I also understand we are dealing with a "scatter" gun, and maybe the nuances of the bead position do not really matter.....but I guess I would rather know what the "perfect" sighting is first.....and then go from there.

Thanks in advance for any responses.....
 

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This has a lot to do with gun fit. In skeet and trap you don't actually aim with the sight. The sights serve the purpose of seeting the gun up. Old saying "head on the gun, eye on the bird". Once you lock the gun into position using the sights, you then look for the bird directly, letting your brain deal with the gun and the bird coming together at the correct point. Hope this helps
 

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Exactly so, IMO. If you're mounting the gun before calling for the bird, the beads are a reassurance you've got a good mount and eye alignment. Then call for the birds and focus on the bird, not the bead or barrel. If you shoot a lot of low-gun practice, as I do, you begin to "feel" the occasional bad mount before you see it.

Now, picking your hold point and your break point are related topics ... but those are questions for better clays shooters than me.
 

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IF I read your statement right - IF you're putting the bead on the target and pulling the trigger - odds are you're missing behind because you're shooting where the target IS and not where it WILL BE.........

this would suggest I am seeing no rib whatsoever, cheek on the stock, and just seeing the bead...) that if the bead were directly in front of the target - so that the bead was blocking the target.....I would still be aiming slightly high of the true center.
since most target-grade guns are designed to shoot high, yes you would.....float the target above the bead and give it the lead it needs
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the responses so far...I am not looking at how to shoot properly - and I am assuming a stationary target. So in other words, pertend we are aiming at a target attached to a tree - and you were trying to sight your gun in. So now, my question about the bead positioning is this:

If the shotgun were mounted on a tripod, and you were looking down the barrel with correct mount with cheek on stock and just seeing a bead with no rib. if you were trying to hit the exact center of the target, would the bead be blocking the center circle exactly - or , just down/south of there, since the bead is slightly higher than the barrel plane?

Thanks again
 

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LostGrouse said:
Thanks for the responses so far...I am not looking at how to shoot properly - and I am assuming a stationary target. So in other words, pertend we are aiming at a target attached to a tree - and you were trying to sight your gun in. So now, my question about the bead positioning is this:

If the shotgun were mounted on a tripod, and you were looking down the barrel with correct mount with cheek on stock and just seeing a bead with no rib. if you were trying to hit the exact center of the target, would the bead be blocking the center circle exactly - or , just down/south of there, since the bead is slightly higher than the barrel plane?

Thanks again
IF it was a field gun, designed to shoot flat - yes.....if it is a target gun, where the sight picture is designed to "float" above the rib - then no
 

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LostGrouse said:
Thanks for the responses so far...I am not looking at how to shoot properly - and I am assuming a stationary target. So in other words, pertend we are aiming at a target attached to a tree - and you were trying to sight your gun in. So now, my question about the bead positioning is this:

If the shotgun were mounted on a tripod, and you were looking down the barrel with correct mount with cheek on stock and just seeing a bead with no rib. if you were trying to hit the exact center of the target, would the bead be blocking the center circle exactly - or , just down/south of there, since the bead is slightly higher than the barrel plane?

Thanks again
I think this may be more or less complicated than you are making out. First thing is, comparing it to mounting the gun on a tripod is not an effective example. If your gun fits you relatively well, when you bring it to your shoulder it should arrive in pretty much the same place each time. Sometimes, to help a shooter achieve the same position each time, a center bead will also be mounted on the rib. You line up the front bead so it is visually just above the center bead and you are good to go. Most shotguns do not have this, and with a decently fitted gun you really don't need it.

So, what you really need to do is study your own mount and see where the gun comes to your shoulder when you mount it. If you can achieve this consistently without modifying your gun, then mount it and shoot at a patterning board to see where the pattern is hitting. This will answer your question about whether the bird should be above the bead or whether you need to cover the bird with the muzzle to get a hit. If the latter is the case with your gun and your mount, then you should probably consider getting the gun better fitted to your body and shooting style. For clays I believe you want to be able to float the bird just above the bead. Otherwise, you will lose sight of the bird when you cover it with your barrel. The result of this will be a lot of missed birds. Hope this helps. Sorry, but there are no cut and dried answers to this sort of question. I also hope all this is accurate information. Anyone with more or different experience, feel free to correct me if I have any of this wrong.
 

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Lost Grouse,

All you need to do to answer your question is to prop up a large piece of cardboard against a tree, mark an aiming spot near the center of the cardboard, back up about 30 yards, and carefully AIM and shoot at the mark.

Assuming you don't flinch or jerk the trigger, then the center of the pattern will tell you where the gun shoots relative to the aim point using your type of gun mount and aim.

As some have said, shotguns aren't usually "aimed" and often times the target is moving. Nevertheless, this simple experiment will show you where you would shoot if the target were stationary.
 
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