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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Who here actualy uses bead sights for clays? I have always been told that they are more of a hinderance than a help. Is this true? I have tried not using the bead sight lately and have gotten much higher scores without its use.
 

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**I have always been told that they are more of a hinderance than a help.**

But, if you look, you'll see that the guy saying that is often using a high-visibility aftermarket bead sight. :roll:
 

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For me the beads are a reference and a lerning tool. They confirm that the gun is properly mounted. Especially in trap where I expect to see the beads stacked. After awhile it becomes a secondary thing and you really don't notice them, unless they don't "look right". The idea isn't to concentrate on the beads during the shot.

If you take the time to look at the beads during the shot, it's a lost clay. Gil Ash demonstrated this by watching the gun barrel, just by watching the barrel movement he could tell if the bird was going to be broken or not. You can see the hesitation as the eyes swaps from the clay to the sites, in that time the barrel slows and you fall behind the target.
 
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That is a great answer Rick. I had a gun wiht those interchangable sights that I used for trap. And I realized that I would miss birds wtih an orange sight in because when I would catch the bird they would blend together and I would focus on the sight and not the target.
 

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I am surprised that the poll comes out with a majority using the bead. May be we have mostly trap shooters who premount.

In sporting clays, it is my opinion the gun should be fitted to the shooter so it always mounts correctly from a gun down postion, and you have no time to look at the alignment of the beads, AND YOU SHOULD NOT.

Look at the target, have the rib in your peripheral vision and look at the target.

Those who use the beads, have some one unexpectedly throw a ball at you so you can catch it. Did you look at your hand or the ball.

You rib should be a part of you like your hand, so you can look at the target.

The key thing is to look at the target, oh I think I said that already :cry:

Roger
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Rick has a valid point. As for Tal/IL I reply that the beads were filed of completely and were not replaced with anything. I am shooting sporting clays so there is no way to always have a consistant sight picture or to have the setup time like in trap and skeet. Such things are imposible in FITASC. Keep the tips and opinions coming! :D
 
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I agree with both Rich and Roger. The reason trap shooters use front and center beads is to gain more accuracy. Trap shooting has been called target shooting with a shotgun.

The most effective use is to backsight targets. In using this most accurate of pointing a shotgun, the sight picture is seen with the front bead in an exact position relative to the target. This is done with the bead always in the preipheral vision. The eyes are always focusing on the target. The end of the barrel can also be used but accuracy will suffer.

The center bead is useful only to check the gun mount in premounted disciplines.

Rollin
 
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Use the beads for what? You should be looking at the target. You should be able to shoot the same score without any beads at all. If you're looking at the beads, you're missing the target.
 
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mk306 said:
Who here actualy uses bead sights for clays? I have always been told that they are more of a hinderance than a help. Is this true? I have tried not using the bead sight lately
and have gotten much higher scores without its use.
i just point and start blasting with my mossberg semi auto 9 shot no not really i cut my bead off with tin shears
 

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If the gun fits you properly, there should be no need for a bead - or even a rib. Your attention should be focused on the spot you want to shoot, and the gun should be pointing there. Any time you're shooting low-gun, you dont have time to make sure you're lined up properly.

Hunting, for example... would you hunt with somebody who walked through the woods with a mounted shotgun??? I know one fellow who routinely runs 100 straight in skeet, but can't hit squat when he's after thunder chickens (ruffed grouse); if you watch him squirm, wiggle, and fidget when he mounts the gun in skeet, it all becomes clear.
 
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