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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I picked this gun up used a couple months ago. I've put probably around 1000 shells through it. It's actually a SuperSport with what I believe is a Sport II stock/forend. On top of that, I put a Montefeltro 26" barrel in place of the SuperSport's 30". It's a bit of Frankengun. But I love the way it shoots and it performs flawlessly.



After 6 rounds of skeet yesterday, I noticed the stock was splitting a bit at the receiver:







Next 2 pictures show that the cracking is full thickness and not just on the top/outside of the stock. Almost looks like the post from the shim could have caused it?





Luckily, I have the carbon fiber pieces that came with the SuperSport to serve as substitutes until I can determine if I need to buy new wood. I really prefer the look of wood over the carbon fiber but at least I'll have functionality.



Any thoughts? Fixable? Toss it in the trash? Firewood?

I should also add, that I shoot lefty. Which means I set the shims up appropriate for that configuration. The gun is right-hand eject and came with right-hand shims installed, obviously the previous owner was likely right-handed. The thought crossed my mind that, perhaps after years of being shot with the right-hand cast and then suddenly changing the configuration might have weakened the wood... Further still, I've been experimenting with different combinations of drop shims. Maybe the wood just decided enough was engouh.
 

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Can you lift the bit of split wood and get some glue under it tape it down till dry the light sand it a fill
With (we call it plastic wood ) filler sand that then re stain and polish .its worth a try
 

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A crack occurs to relieve stress that is localized in that area. It does seem reasonable that the shim caused the stress, but it may have been because the hole the shim fits into was slightly small, or as a previous poster stated, the stock nut was over tightened (almost impossible to do on the polymer stock, but very possible to do on the wood stock). If you like the way the stock looks, you should consider contacting someone who specializes in stock repair and refinishing. Their services are not cheap and they will probably want to finish the forend too, in order to ensure both pieces match after the repair has been made.
 

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Very fixable. You could use accraglass from Brownells. You could relieve the head of the stock a bit also and fill with accraglass to strengthen the stock. If you have no experience, you are probably better off to send to a good stock guy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
ms_man said:
You overtightened the lock nut in the stock.

Seen that exact crack happen on many guns over the years.
I thought about that, I guess it's possible. Though, I was only using a 1/4" ratchet until it felt "gutentight".

I will have to monitor my strength I guess.
 

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A good stock smith can repair that damage and refinish the stock to the point that you'd have to look REALLY hard to see it.

However, price that out vs buying a new stock, the price may be fairly similar and as long as you can get a stock with figure you'd find acceptable, a solid stock beats a repaired one any day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Swinton said:
Can you lift the bit of split wood and get some glue under it tape it down till dry the light sand it a fill
With (we call it plastic wood ) filler sand that then re stain and polish .its worth a try
It DOES lift a little, but I didn't push it too far for fear of making it worse. I just wanted to check to see if it was connected at all (it still is a bit).

I'm no woodworker, but perhaps it's worth a shot :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hmm.. I'm a little new to this forum, is there no way to "multiquote"? Makes responding to individual comments rather time consuming.

Sounds like this could be an excuse to find some upgraded wood :)
 

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Before trashing the stock, I would fill the fractures with Brownell's Acraglass, then use compressed air to force the Acraglass into the crack to insure that the entire void was filled with Acraglass, then clamp the fractured surfaces for a minimum of 24 hours..
This is always the trickiest part, plan ahead on how you will clamp things together.
After the Acraglass has done its magic, (at least 24 hours) insure that you have at least .002" clearance between any furniture and the part it mates to.
This may not save your stock, but it has worked for me before.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Alright, a guy I shoot with on occasion is going to try and fix it. He mentioned possibly trying to "pin" it back down and refinishing that area, etc. Returning some function to it.

I mentioned the Acraglass product that you guys indicated above. He was familiar with it so perhaps that'll be part of the repair.

He took it home with him to look at it and said he'd let me know.

I'll keep you guys posted on how it turns out.

On a side note, I shot with the Comfortech stock for the first time and I was really impressed by the reduction in perceived recoil. Though, it could've also been due in part to larger gel pad. Either way, I liked it.
 
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