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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a very new Beretta Teknys Gold Sporting 12 Ga. It's a very sweet piece.

I got it about a month and a half ago and have fired over 1000 rounds with no problems at all.

I just sent the barrel and trigger group to Ballistic Specialties for angle-porting and a trigger job. I kept the receiver. Today I went to shoot for the first time since getting the barrel and trigger back and had big problems with ejection.

Firing a shell would result in the action opening and either partially extracting the shell to about the start of the crimp fold or getting the ejected shell into the ejection port where upon the whole thing gets stuck. Needless to say there was no sporting clays today.

I tried 1 oz. 1300 fps AA reloads which were the worst, 1-1/8 oz. lite target factory AA shells which usually ended up in the ejection port, and factory Remington Nitro 27s which would eject properly. The reloads are from a batch that had been cycling with no problems before I sent the parts in for work and the factory shells were brand new this morning from Wally World, so they could not have gotten wet.

I had already cleaned the gun several times, but today I bench stripped the gun, meticulously cleaned everything, including disassembling the exhaust valve and reaming out the gas ports If anything, that made it slightly worse.

I cannot feel any noticeable binding in the action. I tried to call Ballistic Specialties, but they do not work over the weekend.

I don't see how porting could effect ejection, so my gut is to blame the trigger group, since it's the only thing that changed. Tomorrow I am going to try to borrow a 391 trigger group from another gun to see if we can isolate the problem.

Have anyone seen anything like this in your experience that could cause symptoms like this? Any suggestions for places to check?
 

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Quite possibly the porting DID affect the reliability of the cycling of the action. After all, the gas ports in the barrel are located just a few inches rearward of where the porting was done. The cycling of the action depends on both the pressure and the volume of gas as the shot charge goes down the barrel past the gas ports. If the gas volume and pressure are drastically reduced just a few inches in front of the existing gas ports, then there may not be enough gas to cycle the action.

I would suggest that you just open the gas ports a little, but with the Beretta's chrome lined bore, the chances of getting a drill bit stuck in the gas ports is quite high (so I'm told), so I wouldn't suggest that you try that.

I can't imagine a trigger job having any harmful effect on the cycling of the action, but I suppose that anything is possible. You may need to get a different (stronger) gas valve spring in order to keep the exhaust valve shut so as to use all the gas generated by the target loads you are using. Try Rich Cole for a new gas valve spring. Good luck and let us know what you find out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I should have mentioned that the gun has a 30" barrel. There is about 6" between the gas ports and the angle-porting.
 

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Try that and also buy some higher presser loads to see if it helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Changing triggers didn't help. the other barrel was mobilchoke and mine is optima so we didn't get to evaluate that change. I'd say the evidence is leaning towards insufficiant gas pressure to cycle to action, since the heavy Remington load will cylce it successfully
 

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As I said above (and I'm even more convinced now), a stronger gas valve spring should cure your problem. Do a google search for Rich Cole. He sells these springs. Meanwhile, just shoot the hotter loads until you get the stronger spring. Good luck.
 
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My daughter has the 20G youth model. Same problem after the first few thousand rounds. Stripped everything apart and cleaned everything, several times, no luck. Finally looked at the only thing I didn't clean, the recoil spring and its cup. When I took that apart, (you have to very gently put a torch on the back nut, it has some type of lok-tite on it), I found that the little cup at the top of the spring was heavily plated with a black residue, enough so that it was fighting the backward movement of the bolt. Cleaning the residue solved the problem, but only for another few thousand rounds. The problem is back. I plan to take it apart again before she comes home for spring break, and I bet I find its crapped up again.
 
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