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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Are there any oppinions on the quality and handling of the beretta essential? Is it worth paying more for a beretta for field use? ( to have fancier barrels and wood and metal)The only questionable feature I noted was the lack of side ribs which saves on weight but allows the barrels to be bent at will, something that could be a safety hazard
 

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Not sure how the side rails missing are going to allow the bending of the barrels at will????I have handled several of the 686, some of the higrades, onyx's etc. I am not a big fan of them cause they just dont feel like what I am used to. Seems like the pistol grip is thin and the forearm doesn't suite me. Several friends like them, one of which uses it for reg trap and waterfowling and has busted the butt stock 4 times so far, I DO NOT shoot his reloads!!This is an older article by Bill O'brien...which leads me to believe that this was an intially European issued double? There is a link to another site that shows the various configs available.Over the last few years, Beretta's over & under shotgun lineup has changed subtly, with new engraving patterns, different stock designs and new names in addition to model numbers. One of the newest is the field-grade Model 686 Silver Pigeon. This attractive gun features all of the elements that have made Beretta a respected name in the gun-making business for almost six centuries. For 1996, the 686 Silver Pigeon comes in a variety of gauges and barrel lengths, allowing the purchaser to suit their own shooting needs. The single-trigger Beretta Essential features selective automatic ejectors and a tang safety with a button to allow the shooter to choose which barrel to discharge. The 686 Silver Pigeon features a low-profile receiver of monobloc construction and sports an electroless nickel finish, adorned with engraved scroll patterns, which incidentally are also found on the top tang, triggerguard, and fore-end iron. Too, the gun boasts hard -chromed bores, a ventilated rib and is fitted with a handsome upgraded walnut stock with fine-line checkering and a Schnabel-tipped fore-end. The package is topped off with a gold-plated trigger and a choice of either fixed chokes or Beretta's Mobilchoke system of interchangeable choke tubes. Barrels run 26 or 28 inches in length and the 686 Silver Pigeon is offered in 12 , 20 or 28 gauge with three-inch chambers (2 3/4 in 28 gauge). Summed up, this is a working over & under field gun at an affordable price, with features one might expect only on a shotgun commanding a much higher tariff.Another Beretta Essential Review
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yes, it is a european issued model, and I believe it is no longer produced, but there are a lot of them still in stock.The bending of the barrels happens if you squeeze them fboth at the same time
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I was told the essentials were made a few years ago utilising parts from the beretta s-54?? or s52?? which was an unsuccesfull model
 

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dont waste your money on one. my uncle lent my dad his for me to use for duck hunting, when i wanted a 12 gauge. When my uncle first bought it, he took it duck hunting. like the day after, the finish was completely rusted, and the stock was split. he had to get the gun parkerized. it still rusts, i think the stock might be salt cured. It kicks hard, and is no where near as good looking as berettas other guns. Although dont assume all will do this. this is just one personal experience. If you want a utilitarian double, browning and ruger make some camouflage models. I think the gun would be fine though for upland gaming and stuff, but i wouldnt take it to the duck pond.
 

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I just bought a used one a few weeks ago.....fantastic gun. A bit light for serious target shooting. The Beretta stocks fit me better than most others....I can't hit well with the Browning Citori or Rugers. The Beretta recoils less to me than the Citori because of the stock fits me better and the action isn't as deep. To me it seems the deeper the O/U action is the more muzzle lift you get when you shoot it. To me the extra money for the Beretta is well worth it when compared to the inexpensive Turkish imports and the Stoegers.

As for the rusting problem......haven't seen it and I've had it out in the rain already. Sounds like B358's relative put his away wet....that could ruin any gun. Saw a $2000 Remington 90T trap gun treated that way. Owner shot a poor score in the rain and put it away for over a month. Solid rust on the exterior. Expensive mistake.
 

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The lack of side ribs is not a safety problem. It is only a matter of cost, cooling of the barrels, and style.

That story about using leftover parts sounds like an "urban myth" to me. Any manufacturer who produced that many excess parts would soon go bankrupt because of inefficiency and lack of planning. Beretta has been in business about 480 years - they don't make that kind of stupid mistake.

The rusting thing is a new one on me - my guess is it was a problem with the handling of the gun, not a characteristic of the metal it is made from. I own or have owned 8 Berettas (but not an Essential) and my experience is all the Berettas made in recent decades have been relatively rust-resistant.

Mechanically, the Essential is the same as the more expensive 68x models.
 

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I used to own an Silver Essential and it was well made and worked fine. The only problem I had was the stock fit was poor for me. it was too long and I could never get used to it. A good friend of mine once complained to me about a Remington 3200 that felt too short for him. He is about 6'4". I am 5'9" and I said have I got a propostioin for you. He really liked the Berretta and I really liked the 3200. He is still using the Essential and loves it.
 
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