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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was at the eye doctor the other day and finally found a set of glasses that my old orange tint clipons fit and over hanged enough on the top to work for me.. Then the tough stuff.. I had single lenses before and lost them.. Even with a flintlock and 9 years the coated plastic lenses never gave me problems or scratched.. Now thier saying poly carbon or whatever, lines, no lines,............. lines are best for beginner bifocal usesrs, the lineless only come in trifocal, etc etc.. :? . What the heck do you guys use?? Im worried about hunting thru a bunch of crap, brush, rocks etc, and the bifocals causing me to fall... Whats my better choices?.. I need bifocals for work reading serial numbers,and tieing knots flyfishing,,,, if im not going to use my magnifying glass all the time.. Is there a single solution for both hunting and work/fishing? dave..
 

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I don't hunt but I shoot clays .. I normally wear progressive lenses and wouldn't want to shoot with them .. I bought a pair of glasses with "distance only" prescription, just for shooting, and they seeem to work fine for me
 

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I started out with bifocals, which worked for reading , but really stunk for shooting, especially rifle shooting with iron sights as is on my flintlock. I ditched the Bi-focals and opted for tri-focals with lines (the widest I could get). At the same time I chose lenses that change with the lighting conditions (not photo grays) but almost turn black in bright sunlight. These are plastic lenses. .. they have proved to be fantastic, and I dont find the need at all for clip-ons of any color. The tri-focal (for me ) fit the bill and allows me to use 3 different lenses. One for distance (not much magnification)great for the shotgun, the second for shooting that flintlock (little more magnification) and the thrid for reading blueprints and details which I do alot at work.

I tried progressive lenses and just about killed myself trying to navigate with them on. The tri-focals I think are easier because its more moving your head to see through each , than trying to move your eyes all the time. What ever lenses you choose though will require some getting used to when you have different magnifications.

One note: I recently bought a new pair of smaller lense glasses (as is the style today) and found I dont wear them half as much as my old pair for these reasons. 1. I could not get sun changing in the smaller lenses. 2. With smaller lenses the tri-focals are nowhere near as good for shooting , because the field of vision is too narrow. (My old pair are aviator style and much wider) So my new glasses reside in work and my old ones are used for shooting and outdoor activities.(I also flyfish and ty) I wont make that smaller lense mistake again. Just thought I'd pass this on while your thinking about what might work for you.
 

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I got my first bifocals this year and was worried about the impact on my outdoor activities but that proved to be pretty much unfounded for me. I have the progressive bi-focals that change tinting in bright light and this combo has worked well for me. Have not noticed any difference when I am wearing them at the trap range or goose blind and scope use is also unchanged.
 

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- The 'modern style' smaller lens openings are a problem for me now, too. If I hold my head at a natural angle for driving, the bifocal line is on the horizon - a bit of a killer when driving. I can't wear progressives as they unfocus too much of my peripheral vision.
 

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I have bifocals that change into sunglasses when it is bright out. I made sure that where they marked the line that it would work without me having to cock my head this way and that.
Mine work fine and I don't even notice them while shooting.
 

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I've worn bifocals for over 30 years, and I tried the no lines once and it lasted 2 days. Seems in the transition area there is an area where I can't focus on anything. I went back to lines. Works better for me. And, I think they call them Transitions, the ones that get dark in the sun, work great. :)
 

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Progressives work splendidly for me - for the past upteen years.

It was like getting my eyesight back - I could read the odometer, street signs and distance as well. I shotgun with them also and never even think about them. Open rifle sights also.

Some folk can never get used to them. It seems that people love them (like I do) or hate them and cannot use them.

Only way is to try them, but if you can wear them and don't care if your glasses are "stylish" then they really are great.

Frank
 

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Progressives - Love 'em. Polycarbonate - Lightweight and almost "as tough as nails." Photochromatic lenses - Transition to dark outside and clear inside. The key for me was to determine where the lenses wuold best begin that progression from distant vision to nearer focus, keeping in mind that the objective is to focus on the bird rather than the bead.

Do remember that it took some time to get used to the progressive lenses when I first tried them out. Patience!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
So for a beginer, a single line (with line) bifocal low on the lens should work for a beginer, who wants to read serial numbers at work, tie flies after,, and large lenses above that.. Sounds right,, ill see if they will move the close up ( focal line down enough so it doesnt effect my walking, shooting driving etc.. does any one think i should opt for a trifocal (lined) moved down on big lenses? dave..
 

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dave, what you mention should work. You will however still need to get used to navigating steps no matter how low the line, as you will naturally be looking down when go down steps.

As for the tri-focal: the reason I opted for them is that there is a difference in vision between looking at rifle sights close to the eye and still being able to focus on a distant target. That little bit of extra magnification helped me a great deal as well as providing me vision to type this post....ha
 

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I tried no line bifocals and HATED them. Went to regular bifocals, and for shooting, I had a set of yellow distance only glasses with polycarbonate lenses. I don't need to read to shoot sporting clays.
 

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When I was about forty, I needed bifocals. I'll be fifty in April, and I'm so used to them now it's not a problem.

My bifocals are the lineless, progressive kind. I shoot with them, but I also have a second pair of sunglasses that are "single vision", just for hunting and boating. Next time, though, I'm going to go ahead and get the sunglasses with the progressive lineless bifocal.

The eye doctors sold me all kinds of polycarbonate, glare tinted, optional stuff. They work. I think the only thing to really insist on is that the lenses be made of tough polycarbonate, so they double as shooting glasses.
 
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