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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just ordered a new FN SLP to go with the Mark I that I already have. I started using the Mark I for turkey and pig hunting, and it works so well for that I decided to get another for my primary HD shotgun.

Now, to my question. How do all of you go about breaking in a new autoloader to ensure its reliability? I know what I have done in the past which is strip it down, clean and lightly oil it, and then go shoot the snot out of it for a while. As you can see, i don't have too much of a scientific approach to the issue at hand. :D

I will be curious to see what all of you think.

Later,
 

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Not sure if this is the proper way to break in a new autoloader, but here's what I did with mine (a Benelli M2 and a Binelli M4).

1) Went to range.
2) Shot the snot out of it.

Actually, with the M2, I took a bunch of clay pigeons and a couple hundred shotgun shells, and ended up breaking some clays. It worked flawlessley from the start. I didn't clean it or anything before taking it to the range.

With the M4, again without cleaning prior to going to the range, I took it to the range and put 25 bulk Walmart purchased birdshot shells down the tube. Sometimes it would eject, sometimes not, sometimes the next round would end up on the lifter and not in the chamber. To remedy this, I went home, cleaned it, and went back to the range with some 00 buck and some slugs. After about 75 rounds of buck and slugs, I went back to birdshot since it's less expensive. It's been flawless since then.

While I don't know if this is the 'proper' way to break in a shotgun, it's what I did. They both run great.

Edit: Since the shotgun isn't a precision rifle, I don't know that it needs a 'break in' other than to make sure it cycles reliably.
 

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Sounds like a good plan to me. I put over 1k rounds through my SPX before I considered her broke in. Suggest you try different brands etc. during break in. Any that do not work right do not use. I started out using loads at 1350 fps, then dropped to 1300 fps, then 1290 fps etc. Also do not cheap out on ammo. Find what works in your gun and stick with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Stan_TheGunNut said:
1) Went to range.
2) Shot the snot out of it.
That's pretty much been my method and it has always seemed to work fine. I just thought maybe I was missing out on some tried and true method... :D I will be curious what others have to say...
 

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Personally I clean every new gun before heading to the range. It's the last chance to make sure everything is in working order and the first thing they tell you in the manuals. I have found crap (metal shavings, gunk, etc) in chambers before that would have possibly done some damage if blasted down the barrel. I know a shotgun isn't really a precision shooting device, but why chance a scar in the brand new barrel when all you have to do is run a patch down it?

As far a breaking it in. Once cleaned I shoot the snot out of it. Actually there is as many schools of thought on this subject (when dealing with rifles and pistols) as there are on the over penetration issue on shotgun ammunition choices.
 

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there is no real defined method of 'breaking in' a shotgun. as opposed to a rifle, which is quite specific.
w/ the shotgun, you just load and shoot until you're bored, or it gets dark... then shoot some more till you have to go to bed.
then more the next day, and so on so forth... :eek:
 

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I'm going to try this method in my soon to be in the mail to my dealer FNH SLP:

First range report - FN Self Loading Police (SLP), The High Road forum member Dhart
I began the "break-in" of the FN SLP today by first cleaning it thoroughly. Break down and reassembly of this gun makes it clear that the engineering that went into the gun is superb. It's a breeze to tear down without tools, although a punch helps to remove the pins holding in the trigger group. After removing the preservative with FP-10, I gave a light coating of FP-10 to the parts and then fired 4 boxes (100 rounds) of Estate Heavy Game Loads (3.25 dram 1 1/8 oz. #6) through the gun with the "lighter" load gas piston installed.
Found some Estate Heavy Game Loads here:

Estate Extra Heavy Upland Game XHG126, 12 Gauge
 

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Always a good idea to clean it first. Get the grease out of it as well as the occasional shaving or metal fragment that won't do the gun any good.
 
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