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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Browning, Belgium dates 1953. Beautiful semi, but when firing the gun the shell does not eject, the next shell comes up from under. I can pull the trigger and the firing pin strikes the primer of the already fired shell,I'll pull back the breech and take the spent shell out then press the button and the gun will reload the second shell( glorified single shot?)
 

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My guess would be that your friction rings are not adjusted properly. If you are shooting light loads and the rings are adjusted to absorb the recoil of heavier loads, the blowback-operated action will not cycle completley. The converse of this situation is shooting heavy loads with the rings set for light loads, resulting in abusive force on your action which can (and so many times has) led to a cracked forearm.

Here are some instructions for proper adjustment direct from the Browning site. Please visit their site and order a manual or download a PDF version from their site. Don't worry about making the adjustment, it's easy - even I can do it! :)

Friction Ring Adjustment for Auto-5 Light 12 and 20 Gauge Models



SETTINGS FOR SHOOTING 2 3/4-INCH MAGNUM, STEEL SHOT, AND HIGH VELOCITY LOADS.

THE FOLLOWING INSTRUCTIONS ARE ONLY FOR 2 3/4-INCH 12, SWEET 16 AND 20 GAUGE MODELS, NOT FOR THE 3" MAGNUM 12 GAUGE OR 3" MAGNUM 20 GAUGE SEMIAUTOMATIC SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS ARE PROVIDED FOR THOSE MODELS IN A SEPARATE MANUAL.

A great deal of attention has gone into the design of the recoil absorbing mechanism to minimize the recoil of the magnum loads as much as possible. It is a mechanism specially arranged for those loads. As shown, it consists of a bronze friction piece and one coned friction ring (See Figure 9).

With the butt of the stock down and the magazine tube pointing up, one friction ring is placed on top of the spring with the beveled surface UP.

The bronze friction piece is then slipped over the magazine tube with its beveled surface up. THE GUN SHOULD NEVER BE FIRED WITHOUT THE BRONZE FRICTION PIECE IN PLACE.
If the correct position of the recoil components is not maintained you will get unnecessary recoil which will severely pound the mechanism of your gun.

NOTE: If steel shot loads will not function with the heavy load setting, then set friction ring adjustment for light load settings.

Friction Ring Settings for Light Loads



The single difference from the arrangement give for heavy loads is a change in the position of the friction ring. For light loads this friction ring is taken off and placed at the extreme rear end of the magazine tube, between the rear end of the recoil spring and the receiver with the beveled edge turned toward the receiver. (See Figure 10.)

NEVER UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES REMOVE THE BRONZE FRICTION PIECE FROM ITS POSITION REARWARD OF THE BARREL GUIDE RING.

If the gun is fired with either the friction ring or the recoil spring in direct contact with the barrel guide ring, the rear surface of the barrel guide will be deformed. Removal of the bronze friction piece permits an excess of recoil. You will be getting unnecessary recoil, thereby pounding the mechanism of your gun severely

You will note, however, that the mechanism must receive a certain amount of force if it is to operate automatically. The addition of any sort of weight to the barrel will have somewhat the same effect. When such factors as these are introduced, care must be given to suitable adjustment of the friction ring setting. It is desirable to utilize the setting for heavy loads as long as the mechanism functions properly. When resistance to recoil is too great to permit proper ejection, the light load setting should be used.

Friction Ring Adjustment for Auto-5 Magnum 12 and 20 Gauge Models



Settings for Shooting 3-Inch Magnums

THE FOLLOWING INSTRUCTIONS ARE ONLY FOR 3-INCH 12 AND 20 GAUGE MODELS, NOT FOR THE 2 3/4" LIGHT 12 GAUGE OR 2 3/4" LIGHT 20 GAUGE SEMIAUTOMATIC SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS ARE PROVIDED FOR THOSE MODELS IN A SEPARATE MANUAL.

A great deal of attention has gone into the design of the recoil absorbing mechanism to minimize the recoil of the magnum loads as much as possible. It is a mechanism specially arranged for those loads. As shown, it consists of bronze friction pieces and coned friction ring (See Figure 9).

With the butt of the stock down and the magazine tube pointing up, one friction ring is placed on top of the spring with the beveled surface UP on top of which a friction brake is placed.

The second friction ring is placed on top of it with the beveled suface DOWN.

The third ring is then placed back to back, that is, with its beveled surface UP. The second friction brake is placed on top of it. This is the correct position for all 3-inch magnum loads.

The three friction rings and the two friction brakes are identical to each other and may be placed in any position for ring or brake within the prescribed arrangement.

If the correct position of the recoil components is not maintained you will get unnecessary recoil which will severely pound the mechanism of your gun.

Settings For Shooting 2 3/4" High Velocity and Steel Shot Loads



This gun has been designed specially for the 3-inch Magnum loads. However, 2 3/4" magnum loads or 2 3/4" high velocity loads may be used if the recoil mechanism is adjusted as follows:

Remove the top friction brake and the top two friction rings as shown in Figure 10. This is also the correct setting for all steel shot loads. The top friction rings and brake should be removed entirely and not simply placed under the recoil spring.

Be sure that the removed parts are placed in a safe place where they will not be lost. You will undoubtedly want to later adjust your gun to 3-inch magnum loads.
NEVER UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES REMOVE THE BRONZE FRICTION PIECE FROM ITS POSITION REARWARD OF THE BARREL GUIDE RING. If the gun is fired with either the friction ring or the recoil spring in direct contact with the barrel guide ring, the rear surface of the barrel guide ring will be deformed. Removal of the bronze friction piece permits an excess of recoil. You will be getting unnecessary recoil, thereby pounding the mechanism of your gun severely. You will note, however, that the mechanism must receive a certain amount of force if it is to operate automatically. The addition of any sort of weight to a barrel will have somewhat the same effect. When such factors as these are introduced, care must be given to suitable adjustment of the friction ring setting. It is desirable to utilize the setting for heavy loads as long as the mechanism functions properly. When resistance to recoil is too great to permit proper ejection, the light load setting should be used.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Check to see if the outside of the magazine tube is clean. Remove the forearm by pushing the barrel down with the butt of the gun resting on the floor or a solid object and unscrewing the magazine cap. After removing, notice the spring assembly so that you put back the pieces properly. Remove the spring assembly and clean. I like Rem Oil to clean and lubricate. Use a clean rag with a light coat of Rem Oil applied and clean the entire out side of the tube. Often a gummy substance of oil and residue will accummilate (this happens to my '68 A5 12 Standard). After cleaning apply a very thin coat of Rem Oil. Also clean (using the same product) the inside of the magazine tube by removing the plug, spring assembly and spring cap (which is located at the inside bottom of the magazine tube). Be careful not to stretch the magazine spring. Heavy gun use may require repeating for outside of magazine tube. This is general maintenance for A5's.
 

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SORRY, BY THE DATE GIVEN I HAD ASSUMED IT WAS A LIGHT 12, NOT A MAG 12.

BEING THAT THE GUN IS FROM THE 50'S I STRONGLY RECOMMEND A COMPLETE GUTTING AND CLEANING.

POLISH THE MAG TUGE TO ALLOW FREE MOVEMENT OF RECOIL SPRING AND FRICTION RINGS.

THEN USE A DIFFERENT 3" MAKE OF SHELL AND KEEP ME POSTED.

RON K.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have a 68 Browning A-5 that for a long time was tempermental. Took it to the smith to run it clean and still would have problems shortly there after. (were talking 15 years ago). Went to a pump for a long time and then the gun was handed down to me. I was bound and determined to make this thing work again. First off the rounds weren't pulling out of the barrel almost like it was stuck and would try to shove another against the back of the shell in the bore. Stripped the gun down cleaned ***** and span. Oiled it up including the recoil spring and magazine tube. Stilll did it. Next Checked the bore and noticed had a tiny almost un-noticable bur deep in the bore of the barrel. Also a flashlight revealed that age old black corrosion that is so light yet smooth had developed over the years un-noticed to us. 00 Steel wool took care of it and it now kicked out some rounds like it should. Notice I said some, It seems it did not like Winchester loads at all but would kick the Rem and Fed rounds off the bore every time. Deducted it is the design of the casing with the grooves of the shell in the Rem and Fed shells provided less surface area touching the bore hence less friction= better ejection. However, now we faced the problem of every once in a while a casing would not be thrown clear and we didnt kown what it was until today. A friend of mine just got a newer mint A-5 12 2 3/4-3inch and were shooting alot of trap shells. And today was his first firing of the gun and I brought mine as well. And he was having the same problem as me. We switched to his other barrel on his and second friction ring set and still had the problem. So we went to heavy 3inch shells and still every few rounds would have that one that does not clear. Until I shot and he watched like two basic training privates on a rifle range. We noticed that we began to anticipate the kick about the time the trigger squeeze and the we would relax too much and actually moving our shoulders back with the gun or not firmly planting it on our shoulder. We banged our heads and realized that this gun works on recoil. Anything we do to counteract the reacoil properties like throwing a wing back will affect the guns ability to eject the cartridge. So then we went back to basics of consiously planting it on our shoulders and not anticipating the shot. (to do this simply concentrate on killing that $#@^$ target!) and our problem went from every 7th shell not kicking out to over 2 boxes in each gun without a problem.
 
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