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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Having recently decided upon what type of shotgun I will use for the rest of my shooting life - Browning Auto 5, I would welcome any info. on the gun.
Have already downloaded manual, parts list etc.
Have book on Auto 5 by Shirley / Vandenlinden.
Does anyone know any good sites
Does anyone have any other info. or tips such as : another post on this site mentioned that moving shoulder back when firing could cause ejection / cycling problems. My experience bears this out as only had ejection problem when I fired gun without it mounted properly and it slid on my arm. Also "action and reaction are equal and opposite" is relevant in this instance.
Any Auto 5 enthusiasts out there ?
Thanks
david
 

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Yes. Here's one. Have been shooting the A-5 for past 35 years. Mainly duck and goose hunting; about 1000 rounds a year. Cracked a couple of forearms being careless, and messed up a trigger in the ice one duck season; but otherwise, they have been perfect. They always seem to fire and eject except some bad reloads. It's one fine gun.
 

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Agreed--it's an American classic, one of the very best. Welcome to the forumns, and do stop back once in awhile and let us know how it's all going :)

Jeff23
 

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"Having recently decided upon what type of shotgun I will use for the rest of my shooting life "

Amazing :!: How the heck did you do that :?: Sometimes I don't know which gun I'm going to shoot tomorrow :!: :lol:

Congratulations on your decision. The Browning A-5 is a fine gun, but I would encourage you to keep an open mind about the subject. You never know when you might run across something you might like better. :wink:

Recoil operated guns (such as the A-5) are more sensitive to being held firmly against the shoulder in order to operate properly than are the gas operated autoloaders. I've found that if you bring the gun up to your shoulder and pull it in snugly while leaning into the gun at the same time, that helps to reduce felt recoil plus it gives a solid platform for the gun to recoil against.
 

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I'm with you Ulysses,
The Perfumed Inner Thigh (I've mentioned before) of the sweet little side by side is always lurking in a gunshop/website/want ads near you. You never know when it will strike.

And oh by the way, I really like A5's. When I was in high school I used to shoot a friend of mines 16 gauge because he liked the sxs I used to use. Great gun and I ran a ton of bad reloads thru it and it always worked fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the input
fivemile
I knew about weak forearms and coincidentally the Auto5 used by my son split the forearm this weekend!!
jeff23
unique speedload system makes it a classic for me. So easy to use compared to Remmy 1100 and similar gassers.
Ulysses
Easy really. Just getting back into clays after 20 year layoff. Had to be an auto as I cannot do with recoil. Too uncomfortable when shooting 200 + shells a session. Must have put over 100k throu my 1100. Auto 5 besides been built well also "feels right" and is so easy to use, which is a big factor. Bought $ 175 Auto 5 as a gamble, as I had just restarted clays having bought a Fabarm Euro lion which had terrible handling/ease of use and suspect durability. Parts failure after less than 800 shells from new. Absolute JUNK. I know I should have researched it better prior to purchase but it was a now or never decision on whether to take up clays again which had to be made, and it hadn't had a bad press over here
I accept that there may be better guns but using my criteria the Auto 5 is just fine.
jiptexashunter
Despite above comments to Ulysses I know that I will no doubt be tempted by others. Curious about the Benelli long recoil - Crio I think its called especially it's ease of use. Cannot see how it will eclipse Auto 5 though.

Thanks to you all for your time & interest
david
 
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Hi Auto-5! Guess what? I just became an Auto-5 convert as well. I watched my father use his for 20+ years on ducks and geese in Saskatchewan. He let me fire it for the first time when I was 10. Now that particular shotgun has been given to me. Co-incidentally, my great-uncle also passed on 2 more Belgian Auto-5's to me (his sons don't shoot or hunt).

From watching them being used, I would have to say the only problem I have noted is that in the 3" magnum models, light loads may have trouble cycling if you a) don't adjust the friction ring/brake configuration or b) let the gun get dirty. Recently, I watched my father eliminate a cycling problem just by cleaning the gun.

One more thing. Now that I own 3 Auto-5's with 4 different barrel configs, I can say that the Belgian barrels are better balanced (vent rib and plain barrel) for the gun than the Japanese invector barrels. Also, the longer Belgian barrels sure point nicely with an Auto 5!
 
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I also shoot Auto 5's and have been a huge fan of the piece for quite a while. Sadly very few people who have shot the things ever acquire an intimate knowlege of how the long recoil system actually works. The recoil dampening effects of the long recoil is actually predicated on how the friction ring ( or rings in the case of the magnum) is set up. The recoil tube is meant to be fired absolutely dry and clean, unless you are shooting low recoil loads.
Further, with the two-piece feed ramp, technically a shell lifter, all you have to do is insert the shell with the action open into the magazine and the gun feeds it into the firing chamber and closes the action in the blink of an eye. I occasionally use an Auto 5 to shoot skeet, and when people see me feed the gun this way they invariably want to see it in slow-mo. Some sweet-sixteens and a very few older Auto 5's have a one-piece shell lifter, and this feature won't work.
I have put thousands of rounds through Auto 5 s and I have 8 of them. I own a Classic, and a DU; both very pretty guns.
All in all an exceptional piece. Take the time to learn its features, and it will reward you with many years on faithful service.
By the way, too bad the brain-trust at Browning discontinued the piece. What is in their heads anyway?
 

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I just recently retrieved an A-5 from my grandparents attic, it was owned by my great uncle and then my uncle. I went to browning's site, and dated it via the serial number as made in 1949. It has the FN logo on the butt plate and just forward of the reciever on the underside. The barrel has a matching serial number as the action and forearm, and has "special steel" stamped on the side, and "Browning arms company st louis mo" on the top. I assume that special steel means it is hard enough to take steel shot instead of just lead, is that correct? I was also wondering if the manual for this gun is available, since the only ones on brownings site are for the lite and magnum models, which i think were separated after this gun was made. Last question i have, sorry for the long post, is what choke this barrel has, since i cant see an indication of it anywhere. Just looking for some help, and this place looks like the place to find it. It sure helped me find out info on the remington 1148 I also recently began using.

PS I began shooting trap and skeet a few months ago, and I am mostly wanting to use the A-5 if possible for either, even though its a heavy gun, it seems to really hold nicely.
 

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jgslick, here's your choke info..
BROWNING CHOKES AND THEIR CODES (ON REAR LEFT-SIDE OF BARREL)

* designates full choke (F).

*- designates improved modified choke (IM).

** designates modified choke (M).

**- designates improved cylinder choke (IC).

**$ designates skeet (SK).

*** designates cylinder bore (CYL).

INV. designates barrel is threaded for Browning Invector choke tube system.

INV. PLUS designates back-bored barrels.
 

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jgslick,

The term "special steel" does not refer to the type of shot that can be used with the barrel. When it was made, steel shot was not in use.

As a rule of thumb, don't run steel shot down a Belgian made A-5 barrel. If you want to shoot steel, buy a Japanese made A-5 barrel with Invector chokes. Otherwise, you run the risk of ruining that Belgian barrel. It was made for lead only.

Q
 

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Well the barrel was made in st. louis, but due to its age I still wont shoot steel shot from it, the gun will probably not stray far from the trap range. Thank's for the info though, i appreciate it.
 
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I would like to know how to give an A5 a thorough cleaning--I don't mean just the barrel and recoil and shell opening but a real good cleaning in the entire action----JJ
 
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I bought an 12GA. auto five magnum Browning(Japanese) this weekend. My problem is that I tried to shoot 2 3/4" shells in it and it would not load or eject the casing???? I am a little new to this type of weapon????Any help??
 

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I sort of like Browning Auto 5s. I have been hunting with them since 1954. Never had one fail me in the field. I shot a deer with my 12ga Magnum two days ago. I own 23 of them plus a number of Remington M11s,Savage M720s and other copys of the A5.
 
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