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The history of the Browning name is clear; that's why I posted the Herstal Group link.

Right now, FN owns Browning, more specifically the Walloon region of Belgium.

FN certainly does manufacture in Liege and Herstal; they still do. FN makes Browning Golds, Winchester SX2/SX3, Hi-Powers, BARs, and Winchester Supreme O/U's for starters. They manufacture far more than most firearm companies you can name-- Remington, for example.

Buckmark .22's are made in the US; always have been. A large portion of Browning engineering remains in Utah. Asking "Browning" to build a gun is like asking Ford or Chrysler to make a car-- they do, they also have parts made to their specs like every other major firearms maker in the world does.

Browning does build, of course, and the notion that it is smarter to "build more" has little basis. They just tried that, of course, manufacturing @ the former USRAC right here, and lost millions.
 

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"The Herstal Group has its offices in Liége, Belgium, the heart of Europe, as well as in nine other European countries, North America, and Asia.

The Herstal Group includes Herstal, the parent company, and two main subsidiaries :

FN Herstal, dedicated to defense and law enforcement products,

Browning and U.S. Repeating Arms Co-Winchester, specializing in hunting/shooting marksmanship, and outdoor sporting goods.

Each subsidiary has its own research, development and manufacturing components, and its own global distribution networks.

Today, the Herstal Group commands a worldwide presence. The markets for all of our product lines - defense, law enforcement, hunting and marksmanship, and related sporting goods - are global, based as they are on an industrial strategy of equally broad scope and vision.

We continuously have used this strategy in our product development so that, today, we offer lines of innovative and reliable products in all four markets. Using the information gathered through our worldwide marketing teams, we are working on integrated project designs on both sides of the Atlantic.

Our production sites in Europe, the United States, and in Japan are equipped with state-of-the-art, high-performance machinery."


As mentioned above, John Browning himself, the "Big Fella," was never a mass-producer of firearms or ran a manufacturing plant. He was a designer, making a lot of money for Winchester, Colt, Remington, and designing gun that helped win world wars.

Browning Arms was formed after a snub by Winchester, and an timely death at Remington that resulted in J. M. Browning's setting sail for Europe with his A-5 design in hand-- and he and respected arms-maker FN came to quick agreement.

FN Browning's have been treasured ever since. At one time the only "Browning" was the A-5, and then just the A-5 and the Superposed. The Browning family sold off their interests in the company later, with the exodus of Val Browning from Browning management as an end-note.

I'm not sure what the question here really is, or why a discussion of Browning is more relevant than other companies.

Far from an easy business, Olin and DuPont were delighted to rid themselves of Winchester and Remington.

Where was all the great profit for Colt? It is the great savings of manufacturing here that convinced Diamler-Benz to dump Chrysler, and cheap American labor has not done all that much for GM or Ford.

The notion that using Miroku for production of some of the Browning line as being problematic carries little credence if you compare the fortunes of Toyota and Honda to Chrysler, Ford, GM.

Europeans work less: but when they do work they seem to put their time to better use. In 1970 GDP per hour in the EU was 35 percent below that of the US; today the gap is less than 7 percent and closing fast. Productivity per hour of work in Italy, Austria, and Denmark is similar to that of the United States; but the US is now distinctly outperformed in this key measure by Ireland, the Netherlands, Norway, Belgium, Luxembourg, Germany, ...and France.

See Andrew Sharpe, Appendix Table 2, "Output per House Levels in the OECD Countries Relative to the United States" for 2003; Centre for the Study of Living Standards, International Productivity Monitor, No. 9 (Fall 2004), at http://www.csls.ca/ipm/9/sharpe-tables.pdf.
 

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SuperXOne said:
And, in spite of all our woes, the USA is still the largest exporter of goods and services, by far, in the world. We aren't gaining any ground, but we still have a long way to fall.
The WTO disagrees:

GENEVA -- China surpassed the United States as the world's second-largest exporter in the middle of last year, according to figures released Thursday by the World Trade Organization, and the Asian country is pulling further and further ahead.

Export growth from China boomed 27 percent last year, outpacing all other major trading nations, the WTO said in releasing its first batch of global trade statistics for 2006.

While China finished behind Germany and the United States in total exports for the full year, it overtook the United States in the last six months of 2006 and will almost certainly finish above the US in the 2007 totals.

At current growth rates, China is projected to overtake Germany as the world's biggest exporter in 2008.
 
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