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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, typical story I guess... Mom mentioned that she still has some of my Dad's guns around - I'm curious, ask to see them.

One is a hand gun, the other a Browning Sweet Sixteen shotgun - serial number X22366. Browsing this forum, I've learned that this isn't the type of gun you turn in at the police station.

Any help in dating this gun and it's approximate value would be appreciated. The gun appears to me to be in very good condition. I can tell you that it hasn't been fired in at least 35 years.

Thanks,
 

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cecill.
X22366 16 gauge would be a browing received at the warehouse, December of 1948.

the 'X' series did not distinguish the sweet 16's from the standard weights, so I'm assumming you know to look for the clues that mark a 'sweet' from a standard.

Value would depend on wether the barrel is a vent rib, what choke, and actual condition of your gun....
90+% wood and metal, no cracked stocks...buggered screws...rust...) original barrel(no choke additions) and so forth,

Best case, 95% original = $ 1,200. from high market auction bidding. .... $ 700. from low market bidding.
Ross R.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Ross, I certainly appreciate the info. It does say Sweet Sixteen on the gun so I'm assuming that it's not a standard. I'll try and post some pictures later today.

I know it's a vent rib since that seems pretty self explanatory. How do you determine the choke?

Thanks for the help - this has turned out to be pretty interesting.
 

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The 'X' series A-5 sixteens are considered some of the best made. The bluing is almost indestructable and all had nice wood. My only issue is the 'suicide' safety but we had an interesting thread on that topic last year and the consenses was split. Some guys don't have any problem with it at all, and like it, others dislike it. It's just a personal thing I guess.

Of course, your gun has a feature no other A-5 has, it was your Dad's and is now in your hands. That gun will still be shooting when the time comes for you to pass it along.
Ross
 

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lighten up, cowboy, rer didn't invent the term himself, it's been around for decades...it was also used for the LC Smiths that had the two position safeties.
It simply means that some folks, myself included, feel that the safeties on both makes of guns is overly dangerous and could have been improved upon.
 

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Guys, I am confused...my pocket guide to Browning serial #s says that FN did not produce any guns from 1946-1951, and that Remington produced them all during that period. Plus, my book does not mention an "X" serial number prefix ecept for 20 gauges made after 1958...was this gun a Belgian gun or US gun, and if US, can he shoot steel in it?
Can someone explain this to me?
:?:
 

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[<<<<my>>>>

It appears the records indicate production stopped in Belgium in 1940 and resumed in 1944. I think Remington manufactured A-5's stateside during this time.

<<<<my>>>>>

The Belgium A-5 sixteen gauge 'X' series started in 1947 and ran through 1953. One easy way to distinguish the Remington 'A-5's from Browning is the location of the serial #. The Remington's have the serial number on the side of the receiver, Brownings have the serial # on the bottom. All 'X' series A-5's were manufactured in Belgium. Browning does not recommend shooting steel shot out of any A-5 barrels, Belgium or Japanese unless the barrel was factory stock with invector or invector-plus chokes. That too, is a topic that stirs up a lot of interesting first hand comments from; " I shoot steel all the time out of older A-5 barrels-no problemo', to; "here is a photo of a bulged barrel"... ...
Ross
 

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Ole Cowboy said:
rer said:
the 'suicide' safety
Does that made this gun better is commit suicide with than one with some other safety? :x
Probably not. I suspect the term caught on because it sounded better than 'a safety prone more to accidental discharges than a cross-bolt safety". Apparently Browning felt there was a good enough reason to change the safety design.
Ross
 

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It's still better than the safety on the early Remington Model 11's.

It's funny how some of the old stuff produces absolute horror now days.

I showed an Audley Holster to some IPSC shooters and they about had a coronary. You had to put a finger in the trigger guard and depress a flat spring to draw. The revolver would have about 2 pounds pressure on the trigger at that point.
 
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