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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there anyway to keep my shotgun from bruising my lower cheek when I shoot? What's causing this?
 

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If you're just starting out, it can also be a symptom of bad form: not having the stock set well into the shoulder pocket, etc.

Along with checking the fit at a gunsmith, you may also want to find someone to take a quick look at your form and shooting stance.

good luck!
 

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If worse comes to worst you can put a foam pad on the stock to keep the slapping from hurting too much. But this is a solution for a symptom, not to the problem itself. The problem, as has been stated, is improper fit.

Gamaliel Shooting Supply has a couple of different "cheek pads", if memory serves, and you decide to go that route. Cabelas has a nice leather lace-up one.

FWIW, a guy I shoot with had a similar problem and solved it with an elastic shell carrier (the kind that slides over the stock) with a piece of cut-up computer mouse pad stuffed underneath. Isn't pretty, but it keeps his cheek from getting bruised.

-- Sam
 

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Poor gun fit and/or holding the gun improperly are two of the main causes. Keep the gun vertical (don't cant the top toward your cheek). Put your cheek alongside the comb, not over top of it. Hold the gun firmly into your shoulder pocket and lean forward slightly. Keep your knees slightly flexed to help maintain balance after the shot. And finally, get some lighter shells. You don't need the heavy shells for most uses. A cheek pad can help a lot also.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ulysses said:
Poor gun fit and/or holding the gun improperly are two of the main causes. Keep the gun vertical (don't cant the top toward your cheek). Put your cheek alongside the comb, not over top of it. Hold the gun firmly into your shoulder pocket and lean forward slightly. Keep your knees slightly flexed to help maintain balance after the shot. And finally, get some lighter shells. You don't need the heavy shells for most uses. A cheek pad can help a lot also.
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The advice above is, in my opinion, very good. Not mentioned is firm cheek pressure on the comb of the gun.

Another possibility that may be causing your problem is the wrong "pitch" on the stock. Pitch is the angle of the recoil pad relative to the barrel.

When the gun is mounted, the top 2/3 of the recoil pad should contact your shoulder just before the bottom part, the toe. If it doesn't, tapered spacers could be added between the stock and recoil pad or the stock could be recut at at a slightly different angle and the pad remounted.

For a trial run, you could put washers on the top recoil pad mounting screw between the stock and the pad. That would increase the pitch. http://stockfitting.virtualave.net/ Rollin
 

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yep.....been there.....chin was bruised bad....Jay didn't want to take me out in public....I kept wanting to put the gun in my chin instead of my cheek....plus the gun didn't fit me....but all good now.....he told me to take it to my cheek first instead of my shoulder first....bad habit I had trying to fit it into my shoulder first then my cheek....I'm learning :D .....and loving it.....
 

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Wearing heavy clothing can cause some of these problems too. When you go to the gunfitter (and a good one ought to be able to look at your mount, stance, etc. and adjust or correct) try it with a tee-shirt, a medium weight jacket, and that giant snow parka you wear in the duck blind:) Worked for me.
 

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Man it really does make a big difference if you are wearing a big goosedown coat over your Carhart's. I couldn't believe the trouble I had getting the gun in the pocket right the first time I tried it. OMG! I looked like I was on the losing end of a bar fight. I got my cheek and chin, and somehow around the side of my eye... I was soooooooo embarassed. Then I finally figured it out and have had no problems since, but I am glad that I was in the woods and only my husband had to see the results. Til I went to work that is... lol
 

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Okay i also had the same problem a nice little shiner right below my eye for a while when i got my new gun. I'm going to suggest this take it or not, I say get an adjustable comb if you are gonna be doing a lot of shotgunning. They are a wonder of a thing. My gun has one and i had to move the front of the comb (part nearest the lever) away from my face and down) so when my gun goes off the stock goes away and down not up and into. If not i would advise (it may not look to nice but i've seen some all americans with a beretta 682 combo with a piece of that stuff that adhesives down that half of it looked like a dog had chewed on it) Either get vet wrap tape, that you put on like horses legs, or invest in a Wrap a comb you can put spacers in it to change the point of impact and its soft so you wrap it around your stock and velcro it down. It works pretty good.
 

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My goodness! There are a lot of people running around with bruised faces apparently. I'll expand into stock fitting a little further and try to help correct the situation.

The gun should be mounted with the top of the recoil pad even with the top of the shoulder for trap shooting; for other disciplines, it is mounted a little lower. Mounting a gun too low will risk cheek slap due to the greater amount of barrel rise during recoil. (See below.)

As I think was mentioned, the gun is ideally raised and pulled back along the cheek to the shoulder during the gun mount. (The upper part of the pad should still make contact with the "shoulder pocket" before the lower part of the pad.) The shoulder pocket is just inside of the shoulder joint and can be identified by raising the upper trigger-arm so the upper arm is horizontal. The indentation just inside of the shoulder joint is the shoulder pocket.

If the stock dimensions match your physical dimensions, the head will be neither turned toward nor leaned onto the stock comb (top surface of the stock) to align the eye with the rib. Of the two, turning the head toward the stock is the worst because it exposes the more sensitive forward part of the cheekbone to the recoiling (and rising) stock.

As was mentioned before, firm contact of the cheek on the comb is necessary to prevent the rising comb from accelerating before it makes contact with the stationary cheekbone. Of course, if the stock fits, the firm contact allows the shooter to look along the rib while the eye is aligned with the rib both vertically and horizontally. If it doesn't, one ormore stock dimensions needs to be changed.

A shotgun barrel rises when the gun are fired. This is because the barrel is above the part of the stock that contacts the shoulder (the recoil pad.) When the gun is fired, it moves back and when meeting the resistance caused by the shoulder, rotates upward. The greater the distance of the recoil pad below the barrel, the more the barrel will rise during recoil, bringing the comb right along with it. It is for this reason that it is important that the upper portion of the recoil pad make firmer contact with the shoulder than the lower part. It reduces the barrel rise by reducing the distance of the barrel above the portion of the recoil pad around which the upward rotation occurs during recoil. When the lower part of the pad sticks out too far, that distance is increased. this is especially important for women shooters. It's rumored that they are built differently than men.

Hopefully, this will answer some questions and offer an indication towards a solution for cheek slap. If it doesn't, click on the url below which is hopefully now working (if I've learned anything.)

http://stockfitting.virtualave.net
 
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