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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

Here's my situation. I've only been shooting skeet for a month but I'm truly hooked. I've been shooting in the high teens with a top score so far of 20. Thought I wasn't interested in shooting trap until I broke a couple birds last weekend with someone's Franchi. I haven't tried sporting clays yet, but I can only imagine that would be tremendous fun.

I have a brand new Beretta 391 that has been flawless and points very naturally for me.

So someone please talk me out of buying an over-under! :p

I'm not really sure why I've suddenly got the itch to get an O/U. Actually, to my great surprise, I am getting a little tired of picking up empty hulls. When I first decided to get an autoloader, having to pick up empty hulls sounded absolutely trivial and I never thought it would ever bother me. Strangely enough, it does...

Now that I've got the trap bug, too, I'm also less inclined to shoot in a group with the autoloader, just out of courtesy to the guy next to me.

But these aren't really valid reasons for a new purchase... In the end, like my four year-old niece is fond of saying, "I just want it." :wink:

Shooting the autoloader doesn't bother me or anyone else at the club, but clay sports just begs for a good double-barrel, doesn't it?

If the weekend comes and I haven't shaken this O/U bug, I think I'm going to have to place an order...

Anyone else start with an autoloader and move to the O/U soon after?
 

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Is 10 years soon after? I started shooting with a Remington 1100 and moved to a Winchester Supreme O/U. The reason it took ten years was the same reasons you have. I wanted an O/U because I wanted it, because I would not have to pick up shells, because I like cleaning them better, because I could have two chokes, and because I like the fewer moving parts.

None of those reasons were worth the cost of buying a new gun. I just kept putting it off. Now I have a new O/U and I couldn't be happier. Did my scores go up, not really. They actually did, but it was more because of changes in shooting style. I really like not picking up empties. I miss my softer shooting 1100 though. The O/U doesn't beat me up by any means and 300 rounds in a day are still done but the 1100 was just a bit softer.

It is really your choice to buy an O/U or not.

And one more thing Sporting Clays is the best clay target game there is!!
 

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Sander said:
So someone please talk me out of buying an over-under! :p
Absolutley not! 8) It's only money! :p

Glenn
 

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Do you really need a reason for a new gun? If I had to justify any of them I'd probably be down to 2 or 3. If you can afford it then get a good O/U and don't settle for a cheapie. You won't be sorry. After all, if you die with all that money you probably won't even get a nicer box to sleep in.
 

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we look forward to hearing about what you bought!
 
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Buy the O/U, but only if you can afford a good one. You will be disappointed in a cheapie and it will not hold up to heavy clay shooting. While I am shooting an 1100 right now and doing fine with it, I miss the feel of the Winchester 101 I once had.

If you keep the Berreta Auto, get youself a shell catcher. The catchers clip on and off easily enough that you can put it on and off during singles and doubles of skeet, leave it on during trap and just get used to picking the hulls up during sporting.

If you really get hooked on trap wou will probably want a proper trapgun anyway. Plenty of people shoot fine with field/sporting guns, but a trap gun is an advantage.
 

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Sorry, I can't help in talking you out of one.

When I got back into trap this year I really wanted an O/U. But I talked myself into buying a semi for all the "logical" reasons: Better quality gun for less $$, less recoil, etc. Still, there was something missing, and I ended up buying an O/U two months later. At least the intervening time gave me a chance to evaluate what I really wanted in an O/U, and I didn't just run out and buy the first one I encountered just to have one.

C'mon, you're really just asking a bunch of strangers for justification to do what you know you really want to do; Buy it. :)

-- Sam
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well, I think all these posts have pushed me past the point of no return :D

I'll let you all know how it goes...
 

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As a relative newbie to the sport, I was happy using my 1100 autoloader, but it became apparent that my knees were not happy at all about me picking up the hulls. Therefore, at retirement age, an O/U was a blessing to my knees and worth the cost. There is the pride of ownership of a nice O/U which alone may or may not justify the price, but my scores are no better with it....yet.
 
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I am really new to this game. I saw most posters said they didn't like to pick up empty hulls. Why is that? If you don't reload then you don't have to pick up the empty hulls, right? Or am I missing something here? I just recently shot my very first clay shooting and I am hooked. In fact, I have the same unreasonable need to buy an Over-and-under. I think my do-it-all Remington 870 Express Super Magnum will have to take a break and the new o/u take over the clay events.
 

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OK Sander - here is a 'don't buy that OU' message.

Or may be that should be 'don't buy one yet'

If you have only been shooting a month, you have not yet got the kinks out of your gun fit, stance, mount, swing, and do not yet have a full library of the needed lead pictures. You are doing VERY well to be getting 20 at skeet in a month - how many shells have you shot 2000?

If you buy another gun you will almost certainly suffer a set back to your shooting, and it may not be a short one. It may take a year to get over it.

Shooting is fun, but it also requires work to be succesful, if you are just beginning to find your groove with the auto, you will lose it by shooting another gun. You will set yourself back.

Now can you buy this other gun and NOT shoot with it ? :cry: I doubt it.

We have a saying - beware the man who only shoots one gun. My biggest downfall was a shoot off at a Country Fair at Stratfield Saye in England (=State Fair). The other guy had shot the same gun for 29 years !! Just that one. He knew it perfectly and cleaned my clock, in spite of my lovely new 32 Inch BrowningGti/Browning Vest/Browning Hat..... :oops:

This does not mean never buy another gun, just wait till you have around 5000 shells under your belt, or you are consistently hitting 23/24 without difficulty.

Just my opinion of course

Roger
 

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To Alex--be aware that some ranges require that the hulls be picked up and for those of us with aging knees, that kinda takes the fun out of the sport.
 

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Not to mention it's just plain good form to clean up your own litter.

And it makes a convenient excuse to buy an O/U, as well! :)

Re: Roger. Yeah, but with only a month or so of experience you could just as well get a new gun instead of developing all sorts of habits on a gun you know you'll eventually be moving away from. That is, he hasn't had time to develop habits with his Beretta, so he might as well get the new gun now and start developing habits on it.

-- Sam
 

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Agreeing with SamL--having to pick up the hulls was a good excuse to purchase an O/U AND also I figured that if my 1100 and I become as one with the force, that the later adjustment to an O/U would take longer, so why not start with the shotgun I intend to end with. OTOH, a friend with whom I shoot is used to his 1100's, but is so experienced that it really doesn't matter what he picks up--he hates my 32 inch barrels and even used my O/U on a round and did his usual 22+. I still like the idea of staying with the same shotgun that I plan to use for a long time--as I learn the game. Since you are a newbie too, I would suggest finding a copy of Todd Bender's video--it is now on DVD too.
 

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I understand what Sander is going through. I shot sporting clays for the first time earlier this summer. I now have a new Winchester Supreme Sporting that I got this past weekend. Shot a 60 the first time I used it. I guess that is a fairly respectable score for only my second time!!! I cant believe how addicted I have become to shooting clays. I just found this forum today and look foward to getting some tips from here!!

docjoe
 
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docjoe, what a coincidence! I too shot my very first clay early this summer and I am hooked. I have a Winchester Supreme Sporting on order and be receiving it sometime next week. How do you like the Supreme?
 
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alex...take this with a grain of salt as I am new to clays and I know very little about shotguns Having said that....I absolutely love my new gun. I have the sporting model with 30" barrels. The gun came with several choke tubes. I got the gun from my father in law who is part owner of a gun shop. He has shot clays for years and has at least 40 shotguns of all types in his collection. He felt it would be a very good entry level gun to learn with. I totally agree. It felt very comfortable to me. I like the longer barrels. Although it is not a "flashy" gun it is very solid and nice looking. I am very satisfied and would recommend it. Good luck with the shooting and the upcoming gun!!

docjoe
 

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Docjoe and Alex, it must be something in the air: The O/U I ended up with is the Winchester Supreme Select Sporting, too. Great features for a nice price. Everyone oughta own one! :) The guys at the range I shoot at all like it, too. Quite a gun for the money.

-- Sam
 
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