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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ponder this skeet addicts, my 410 skeet scores have improved very, very well in the past year, I have favored this bore because of shot prices, lack of recoil and I wanted to simply get better with the 410. However, my 28 and 20 gauge scores remain the same, generally 95/100, sometimes worse especially with the 20 gauge. So....do I lay off the 410 for awhile and work on the others?. Interestingly, I have been working on my doubles game with 20 gauge and that is indeed improving.
Thanks, Jim
 

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There is only one logical answer to your delema: cease shooting skeet and take up trap.

That way, the .410 issue becomes moot.

That'll be $90, pay my receptionist on your way out.

Next patient, please........................................
 

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Yes, to answer the question as asked. I see the 410 as good for learning exactly where to put the pattern in relation to the target. HOWEVER, once you get a good handle on that, you need to shoot the 410 like you shoot the 12 (or 20, as the case may be). If you shoot the 410 too much, you will shoot the big guns the same way. That's bad. The greatest 410 shooter of all time (coincidentally the greatest skeet shooter of all time) is the source of this information. He practices only with the 12 during the winter and mostly the 12 in the short break between then end of winter and the start of the season. Of course, once the season starts, he doesn't get much practice because he's either on the road or at a shoot! The grand master says you should shoot just enough 410 to keep familiar with it--to be used to the lack of recoil and the smoothness required. Otherwise get out there with the 12 (or 20), blow smoke and get your confidence up--'cause that's the key.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
MRPOWER said:
Yes, to answer the question as asked. I see the 410 as good for learning exactly where to put the pattern in relation to the target. HOWEVER, once you get a good handle on that, you need to shoot the 410 like you shoot the 12 (or 20, as the case may be). If you shoot the 410 too much, you will shoot the big guns the same way. That's bad. The greatest 410 shooter of all time (coincidentally the greatest skeet shooter of all time) is the source of this information. He practices only with the 12 during the winter and mostly the 12 in the short break between then end of winter and the start of the season. Of course, once the season starts, he doesn't get much practice because he's either on the road or at a shoot! The grand master says you should shoot just enough 410 to keep familiar with it--to be used to the lack of recoil and the smoothness required. Otherwise get out there with the 12 (or 20), blow smoke and get your confidence up--'cause that's the key.
Thanks Mike, that's excellent advice and I plan to follow it
Jim.
 
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Ya know. Advice from old Wayno is suspect.

This guy could break very close to the same scores and have the same records he has shooting ALL .410. I do not think that what Wayne says relates real well to most normal mortals. And I don't mean that in a negative way. I am suspicious that the guy can't appreciate fully what limitations a normal guy has that he takes for granted in his own abilities.

At any rate, in my life and the lives of others I practice with, I have seen substantially exclusive use of the .410 improve overall games dramatically. I find guys that shoot the 12 ok can't hit beans with the peanut because they are too sloppy. I see guys shooting alot of 12 that flinch. Flinching -that is protective reaction due to recoil -is a great destroyer of scores.

So how do you want your confidence served? Scared of the peanut because you think it's hard to hit with or startled by the big boomers that almost leap out of your hands when you touch them off?

I'll take mine small thank you.

I shoot the peanut a good deal and bring out the 28 for doubles and to make sure I am holding onto the gun. I do not shoot the 20 or 12 ever in practice. I don't shoot the 12 period because I see it as major overkill and major recoil. And I don't shoot the 20 because it's not economical. I am a skin flint. I am poor. I do not have an active recoil device on my gun. It's a graycoil with a magnum kickeeze. Nothing moves. If i had a good recoil device maybe I would shoot the 12. I dunno. I like to screw in tight chokes to challenge myself to center the hits and to intimidate the rookies during practice. I am big on idol worship.

I shoot my famous 160 grain load of hard nines over a bean and 8 grains of WSF in the AAHS .410 . I kid you not. Try it -it's a challenge - and fun. And cheap.

This is how it is for me. Your mileage may vary and if it does, say how. I won't call you a big dummy like Paul Clayton is.
 

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Skeetshooter 53, I am impressed and pleased that you are shooting the 410 so well. I offer a couple of points for your consideration;
A long-term skeet shooting friend, now dead, who shot much better than I, when I asked him why not practice exclusively with the 410, said that such would be OK, as long as I did not attribute misses to the 410.
The 410 has a much smaller effective pattern and we should not attribute misses to the gun. Also, some shooters shoot the 410 much more carefully than they shoot the larger gauges; they often "aim" the 410. In my view, that is a bad habit. One way of checking this is break point. Are you breaking the targets just or well before the stake, or in the same place you break them with larget gauges? If the targets are getting to the stake before you take them, and you break them earlier in the larger guns, you may well be aiming the gun. Another factor is the "new gun factor". I have a friend who shoots poorly, primarly due to eyesight, but he also has a host of bad habits, which he would like to overcome, if only he did not have to change! He borrowed a Beretta 390 from me one time and broke 25 the first round. He immediately wanted to buy the gun. He frequently buys a new gun and often shoots it well for a few rounds, then reverts to his old habits. Perhaps you are shooting a "new gun".
In any case, shoot the 410 with joy, as long as your hulls hold out! Glad to know of your pleasure. I shoot the 28 nearly all the time, but go back to the 20 now and then, just to keep aware of the added recoil.
Floyd in Vienna
 

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You know Mr Modelle, for the most part I've really kind of been enjoying your posts since you've arrived on the scene here.

You've imparted some pretty good info from time to time mixed in with equal parts of wit and humor which has made reading many of your posts kinda fun.

But then I'm suddenly, and totally at a loss as to why you'd feel the need to end one of your posts with:

I won't call you a big dummy like Paul Clayton is.
Not real sure how Mr Clayton got involved in this one? :roll:
 
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Relax Old Vet. It's pure antagonism, designed to provoke yet another round of Oklahoma bloviation.

My turkey has been thawing out now for four days in my refrigerator and it is still as hard as a rock. I am about to take more drastic measures.
 

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Mix it up. Maybe 40% .410, 20% with the 20 gauge, and 40% 3-4-5 doubles. Practice some shootoff doubles with the .410 too. Few regularly practice it, but the .410 can be surprisingly effective on doubles from 4, and nothing is more humbling than being called to your first .410 shootoff having never tried it. Build some confidence for the day you find yourself in a .410 shootoff.

I've tried some 3/8 oz. factory .410's that were given to me. They hit most of 'em OK, but confidence with the .410 is everything. Unless you're gonna shoot them in the events, I see no benefit. :?
 
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Think how confident you will feel when marching out for your first field in the .410 with a FULL HALF OUNCE having practiced with less. If you put in tighter chokes you can shoot amazingly good with 3/8's. Give it a try. Show those Chinese consumers who is who. Use less lead. You can substitute 8.3 grains of Longshot for the 8 grains of WSF. With the bean spacer you do not have to mess with the press. Not for progressive machines. I agree with Mark. When you get to where you are a threat to make the shootoffs you best work on them 3,4,5 so you don't feel insecure.

My wife says if I ruin the turkey I'm in for it. And she hits.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
ShootingStar said:
Mix it up. Maybe 40% .410, 20% with the 20 gauge, and 40% 3-4-5 doubles. Practice some shootoff doubles with the .410 too. Few regularly practice it, but the .410 can be surprisingly effective on doubles from 4, and nothing is more humbling than being called to your first .410 shootoff having never tried it. Build some confidence for the day you find yourself in a .410 shootoff.

I've tried some 3/8 oz. factory .410's that were given to me. They hit most of 'em OK, but confidence with the .410 is everything. Unless you're gonna shoot them in the events, I see no benefit. :?
Thanks Mark, great advice, I have practiced doubles with the 410 and my biggest challenge is consistentcy with the second target at station 4. You are right about limited folks practicing 410 doubles, I see the same here. My 410 singles confidence is pretty good, now I need to develop the doubles side.
Thanks
Jim
 

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skeetshooter53 said:
...biggest challenge is consistentcy with the second target at station 4.
Shootoff's with the .410 are always a crapshoot. Many times it's over in one or two stations, and rarely does it go a box. Even against the "big dogs", the outcome is hardly predictable. Anyone who's earn a spot in the shootoff has a reasonable chance as long as they've prepared. If you've got a tight top choke (.010 -.012" or so) for your tubes, give it a try.
 

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A wise skeet commentator/participant once told me that if you go 8 stations in the 410 at the world, you're on the podium at a minimum. So far that's been born out! (In my observations, of course, not experience!! :oops: )
 

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While my scores are not what you'd want as a skeet shooter, I do find that shooting MY .410 BPS with a factory I/C choke helps me keep better scores with the larger guns. Notice I said MY. My four BPSs all shoot relatively 50/50. They all fit me the same with but a few minor adjustments.

I just don't have the time to shoot much anymore. :(
 
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