Shotgun Forum banner
1 - 20 of 61 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
541 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Alright by now you people must have seen the tidal wave of new cheap guns flooding the market. With all these companies like Huglu, Bakail, Stoeger, Charles Daly, Verona, and Traditions (If I have left any out, add them). Now some of these companies make guns that have time after time failed or have not worked from new. However some have made very good guns that, may not have the finish of the big companies, sure do shoot as good for much less money. So anyone who has one of these guns and wants to enlighten us as to if it is a good "workhorse" then please feel free to let us know. Also if you have one and feel it was a waste of metal and money please let us know. So what I am asking is what do you guys and girls think of these guns. Even if you don't have one but are thinking on getting one. I for one am looking at the Bakail IZH 27 O/U and think that these new "cheap" guns are a great thing, and will help newbies come into the sport.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
I own the IZH43 dbl. barr. 12ga. Tougher than a mule, brings home the game, just not the prettest girl at the dance. Finish wears fast, nice wood, rotten wood finish. Built to spec.s. The sucker was cheap, don't expect a pigon grade out of a Russian tank of a shotgun, with my luck, the dang thing will last for years before I can throw it away. You can't go wrong for the money paid out. 20ga O/U I have handled was stiffer than all get out from this company, really hard to open but, solid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
When you deal with rebranders rather than manufacturers(eg Tristar, weatherby, charles Daly) you need to distinguish between different guns they sell. Some can be very good (usually spanish italian japanese etc) and some pretty awfull, depending on who makes them.One should not generalise and speak badly or positively about their whole range but concentrate on the downsides or virtues of specific models these rebranders sell.Some of their cheap guns are 'cheap' in the bad sence and other could be good quality shotguns stripped of decorations and fancy finishes to keep the cost down. Especially with European and asian guns who actually made the gun makes all the difference. avrantinissihtimini
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
Im not aware of the balial or bakial brand you talk off...??? avrantinissihtimini
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I have had a baikal mod 153 semi auto for over a year now and have had no probs with it. I have owned more than ten other shotguns incl Browning A5, Remington 1100, Winchester 1400 Franchi auto and Atis auto.The reason I piced the mp153 was that it fitted me well and was well priced for a new 3/12" auto.I shoot better with it and to my experience this is a much more important factor than finish brand name or "quality" also it is well made and the walnut stock and dull finish on metal work is nicer looking to my eye than the plastic fantastic look of some modern shotguns.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
I have been shooting a stoeger over under 20 ga. for a year now and have put it through a lot of stress without a thing going wrong. The only problem i have had has been the firing pins making good contant in winter tempuratures, but after a couple of shots it fires fine. It has good lockup and reliable ejection but definitely not the best on the market. It is a fine gun for a casual shooter who wants to break some targets or kill some rabbits or doves. In my opinion it is a good gun for just over $400.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,667 Posts
Wow rembrn, +$400??? Check this site:www.wildwestguns.net/wild...otguns.htmhas several listed at $309.99 tp $359.99 There is a fine line between hobby and insanity.Edited by: Rick618 at: 2/13/03 12:07:55 am
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I used a NEF 20 gauge single shot to harvest a deer. I took it to the range,put 3 slugs on a paper plate at 70 yards and took it hunting. It is an outstanding lightweight shotgun. I 'd love to get a 10 GA version but have yat to see one. For the 89$ purchase price,that 20 Ga was cheap,but it sure did not act it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Hey Guys I owned a Stoeger Model 2000 for a period of time before trading it off, I put many rounds through it and the gun worked flawless. It threw a pretty good patten and actually had a pretty smooth action. One of the best things about the gun is it's a breeze to strip apart and clean. With a little guidance I believe my eight year old could have disassemble and cleaned it. I give this gun two thumbs up in the low budget gun category. 0]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Rick618,I never said that I was a expert shooter like you claim to be. Because I am only 14 years old I do not have the luxury of having an FFL or spending $1000 on a gun, I merely stated that it suited my needs and anyone elses needs that couldn't spend alot on a shotgun. And unless you have ever shot one or put one to work you shouldn't state that I am insane.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
541 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
rembrwn,Ricks signature is:"There is a fine line between hobby and insanity". It is that way on all of Rick's posts. Second he does not claim to be a shotgun expert that title was given to him because of his knowledge. They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. -Benjamin Franklin, Historical Review of Pennsylvania, 1759.Edited by: john305 at: 2/15/03 12:30:52 am
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,667 Posts
AND the purpose of this site is stated to find the best prices on shotguns.......hence the link to the lower prices. With the intent to provide anyone else that desires to have that particular shotgun with an option at a better deal than rembrwn was able to locate.Nowhere in the post is there an attack or even a mention of rembrwns abilities or lack thereof. Also, nowhere is it stated that I am an expert shooter. Tag lines or signatures appear on many sites and many users posts.With the correct information anyone is able to go to the local shop and attempt to haggle the price or atleast know where they stand when someone offers to give them a "reduced" price.A specific example is today, a friend of mine is looking at various trap o/u's. A mutual friend told us of one at a pawn shop. This particular gun is 15-20 yrs old, no longer made and is in 85-90% condition, the major flaw being a dime sized ding on top of the monte carlo stock, something that will all but disappear with a little TLC. It has a ticketed price of $1900, a similar gun at gunbroker is listed at $1300 and $1500. I know that the gun has been in the pawnshop since atleast the summer and have a good idea of the amount of money that a pawnshop would "give" for an item (and they don't make money off of items that are sitting in the showcase). When asked what they would take for the gun, they offered $1775+8% sales tax...what a deal...not! Then when that didn't seem to interest the buyer a second offer of splitting the sales tax was made, still not a deal yet. The numbers really don't matter, whether it is a $100 or a $10,000 shotgun, if you know what is out there and what they sell for you are in a better positition to get a better deal or atleast determine that you are NOT getting the most bang for your buck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
I have a Traditions Fieldhunter O/U 12 ***** that I like very much.I also like the Stoegers but I don`t think they are in the same leauge as the Traditions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I have one of the "cheap" guns you mention--the Verona. I hope you realize that it is built by one of the most respected builders of o/u's in the world--I Rizzini. I just came home from shooting trap with it and it performs flawlessly. I have put hundreds of rounds through this gun and have never had one problem. I shot trap (I am brand new to the sport) with several older, more experienced trap shooters and I had the cheapest gun there. I outshot most of the ones I was shooting with. Put cylinder chokes in it, some 9 shot and broke 18 on the first round of skeet I ever shot. Again, I had the cheapest gun in the group but I did not have the worst score. I purchased this Verona right off the rack where it was sitting next to 2 Berettas that did not have as good a wood on them as the Verona. It is not a matter of money as I have purchased several guns in the last 3 or 4 months. the Verona was my first o/u and I buy guns to use--not look at. I figured that I would not spend much and if I did not like the o/u style then I am not out a lot. have since bought a brand new Citori as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
I got back to shooting trap in January after a long layoff during which I (like an idiot) sold my BT-99. After much research, I decided to buy a Huglu U4 Trap Single for $635 delivered to my FFL transfer agent. When I got it, it was very tight, almost painfully so. If I hadn't been warned that it would be, I'd have thought something was seriously amiss. After a few hundred rounds, it's breaking in nicely. It fits me, it functions flawlessly (so far) and as of now, I'm standing fourth in singles in a field of 61 in spring leagues at our club. This is better than I ever did with the Browning. ;) I liked the Huglu so much that I bought a U4 Trap O/U for the same price. I just got it today and I haven't shot it yet. Maybe tomorrow if the weather cooperates. I admit that I see some quality control issues between the two guns, mostly cosmetics. The single appears to be the better of the two. If the O/U works as well for me, I'll forgive the minor cosmetic items.The bad news? Well, I got the last ones available until sometime in May, and then the price goes up a bit. I still think they are a good value for the money. If I have any problems, I'll post that fact.-ChuckHuglu - Because the best is, well...expensive!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I have been shooting trap for about three years. I go out at least once a week, shooting at least two rounds each time. I began with a Mossberg pump I bought about 25 years ago and never really used before I began trap shooting. About a year and half ago I bought a Traditions Field Hunter O/U with screw in chokes. It has a 28" barrel. It is made by Fausti. The wood is checkered and finished with a hard, glossy urethane-like varnish. The gun was very tight at first, to the point where I felt like returning it as defective. It literally took both hands and some force to break it open. After about a thousand rounds, it felt OK. After about another 2,000 rounds it started to feel good. It has only misfired once that I can recall, and that one time may have been human error. It is nicely finished, balanced, fits well, swings well, sights well and works smoothly. The ejectors pull the spent shells up, for pulling out by hand. No shell has ever stuck. One of the chokes got stuck once, probably because I had not loosened, cleaned or oiled in almost a year. It was difficult to remove it, but ultimately no damage was done to either the gun or the choke. During the time I used the Traditions, I shot several other O/U's including Brownings and Weatherbys. The Traditions is a bit lighter in weight in comparison and, as a result, the recoil is more noticeable. I believe it was around $500 new. Although it is a field gun, as a first gun for trap, I recommend it highly.About five months ago a friend and I went shopping for new guns. We were both looking to spend no more than $2,000.00 each. After trying several manufacturers and models, my friend went with a Beretta 686 Silver Pigeon S. It is simply beautiful. I had a hard time not going with same choice. However, I ultimately chose a Verona. Although it was not "cheap" and Veronas were hardly "flooding the market" (in the six or eight stores we went to, this was the only Verona we saw), it cost about $600 less than the Silver Pigeon. The model was designated as "VX 680." As someone mentioned, it is made by I. Rizzini, a company located in the famous shotgun making valley in Italy. The wood is nicely (probably machine) checkered Turkish walnut, with a nicely rubbed oil finish. In general, it looks nice but not in comparison to a Beretta or Browning, for example. However, it shoots very well. The first day I got it, I couldn't wait to try it. The first time I ever shot at night, I shot a 24. Although it has field grade stock, it feels right for me. It has 30" barrels. Add another 3/4ths of an inch or so for the Briley Spectrum extended chokes it came with. It has broken in very nicely. After almost 1,500 rounds, I have no complaints whatsoever. There is nothing about it I would change. I had a chance to get an adjustable Monte Carlo stock for it, but I passed on it. I had a minor quesition, on how to care for the wood-- a factory person responded quickly with helpful information. Amidst all the Brownings, Perazzis, Kreighoffs I see all the time, the one thing I can say about the Verona is "it is not as shiny." For function, I would not trade it. For looks, I might consider an EELL Diamond Pigeon when the time comes to get a new gun, but the probably won't be until something goes wrong with the Verona. At this point, I don't anticipate that happening.
 
1 - 20 of 61 Posts
Top