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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know this is a shotgun forum but I need ammo help for a rifle.

I am going to use Federal 3" rifled slugs in my 20 gauge, but I would like to know what you guys use with a 30-06 for deer.

I just inherited a Rem. 742 Woodsmaster from my grandfather and I would like to know what bullet will drop a deer in its tracks at 25 out to 400 yards.
 

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20 gauge

Is that the semi auto or the pump?

They say every caliber has an optimum bullet wieght for efficiency. The 150 grain is a great wieght that will knock a deer silly. However, I read somewhere that the 165 grain is optimum for the 06. It packs just a little more punch than the 150 and has nearly the same trajectory.

You can't go wrong with either. You might also want to try the 180 grain.

The best thing to do is take it to the range and see which load will get you the tightest groups. Go with what ever shoots the best out of your gun.

No deer will stand a chance against the 06.
 

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No ammo is going to kill deer in their tracks every time. Shot placement is first, then ammo. I shot a deer in the heart at 10 yards one time with a Rem 7MM Mag, 165 grain bullet, and it still ran 85 yards through the woods. Another time (same ammo) I shot a deer at 75 yards, broad-side double lung shot and it just fell over dead. Strange critters.

Pick a well made bullet (any of the major brands) from 150 grains and up and you should be in good shape (I hunt in MS, where most deer I kill are b/n 125-175 lbs. If you're hunting really big deer pick a bullet on the heavy side). For what its worth I've been using 150 grain Federal ballistic tip ammo for the last several years and I have not had any bad experiences with it. I've recovered several of the bullets from the animals, and all had massive expansion. I've used Remington Core Lokt, as well as Federal Boat Tail Soft Points, all worked well.

Pick a good name brand bullet, and practive with it. 30-06 has a wonderful range of bullet weights to choose from. Good luck, and happy hunting.
 

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for the shotgun use Remington CoreLokt 20guage

for the 30-06 use Remington Corelokt 165 grain for deer sized game
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The rifle is the semi-auto version.

I have heard the same about 165 grain bullets, but some say the 180 grain is really more than you need and it should be used for elk or moose.

I have also heard the balistic tips expand on impact and they are really good. But will they stay together like Nosler Partitions or Core-lokts??? (I dont know if I want a bullet that shatters when it hits something.

I was recently reading balistics tables on the 30-06 and I read that you need 900ft.lbs of energy to cleanly kill a deer, and 1200 for moose and elk.
Well the 150 grain core-lokt bullets deliver 876ft.lbs at 500 yds and the 165 grain delivers 963ft. lbs. So I believe I will go with the 165 grain.
However the 150 grain ballistic tip has 1247ft.lbs at 500 and the 165 grain ballistic tip has 1350.
The big winner is the 180 grain Rem. Scirocco, 1409 ft.lbs at 500 yards.
 
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YOU MUST BE HUNTING SOME WIDE OPEN COUNTRY TO BE SHOOTING AT DEER FROM 500 YARDS. HOW WILL YOUR SHOT PLACEMENT BE FROM THAT DISTANCE? I'D BE MORE WORRIED ABOUT THE DEER MOVING/CHANGING POSITION BEFORE MY BULLET GOT THERE THAN A FEW FT/LBS OF ENERGY.

WHAT TYPE OF SCOPE ARE YOU USING? DO YOU PRACTICE A LOT FROM 500 YDS?

IT SOUNDS LIKE YOU ARE PUTTING WAY TOO MUCH EFFORT INTO PICKING A BULLET. PICK A GOOD BULLET AND PRACTICE WITH IT. IF YOU PICK ANY OF THE MAJOR MANUFACTURERS YOU COULD PROBABLY START FLIPPING A COIN ONCE YOU PICK THE WEIGHT YOU WANT. I DOUBT THAT YOU WOULD BE ABLE TO TELL THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THEM IF YOU PUT THE BULLET WHERE IT BELONGS. QUIT LOOKING AT THE DATA TABLES AND GO SHOOT.
 

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For whitetail hunting with an '06, anything from 150 to 220 grains will do the job; probably the best all around choice is a 165 grain.

As to the energy it still has at 500 yards.... unless you're an ex-military zapper, or have spent half your life on the rifle range, 200 to 250 yards is the maximum practical distance.

Hunting shots are almost always taken from a less-than-perfect position... sometimes a downright awkward position, and often offhand. In a lot of those cases, 100 yards is a darn long shot - especially at a moving target.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well when I was 18 years old I killed a deer at 395yards with my dads .270. dropped it in its tracks with a 130 grain core lokt.
I hunt in a 50 acre clear-cut sometimes and if that big one walks out and wont come any closer on the last day, I might just have to make the shot.
 
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500 yrds?

One Word.....HAHA.

Good luck with that. I have heard of it happening but it took 5 shots to get the trajectory right. :)

Peter
 

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Salmo said:
500 yrds?

One Word.....HAHA.

Good luck with that. I have heard of it happening but it took 5 shots to get the trajectory right. :)
With a 30-06 that may be a little bit of a stretch without pratice. However with my 7mm STW 160gr bullet, I shoot 5 inches high at 100 yards. Dead on at 400 yards, and 12 inches low at 500 yards. It doesn't take me 5 shots to get the trajectory. You've got to have a good range finder though.

I place the shot 4-6 inches above his back depending on estimated size of the buck, and still deliver 2000 foot pounds of energy. That is with factory loads.

I have developed some hotter loads that are even more impressive.
 
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This may be a sacrilegious question, but has anybody ever aimed a 00 buckshot at whitetails? 9 pellets from 2 3/4" 12 ga., 30 yards, closed pattern, head shot, ought to put some damage at least in theory? anybody cares to comment?
 
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If you manage to get a good, consistant pattern like you mentioned above, you're doing real well.

However, in my not-very-extensive, but still very good experience, the 00B loads normally don't pattern very well unless the barrel is tweeked for them. I've had much better luck with single-ought buckshot (0B), #1B and #4B as far as patterns go. I've killed two mule deer with #4B and while on the smallish side, it worked! That same day and earlier that morning, I doubt I missed the doe that was forty yards away standing broadside when I let fly with a 12 gauge 3" load of 00B (fifteen pellets in that pattern vs. 9 or even 12 in a 2 3/4" magnum). I found no sign of blood or hair, but she was still and I was steady when I fired.

The number of pellets in a pattern are what was effective for me. When growing up in the South, knowlegeable deer hunters who enjoyed regular success often preferred #1B (sixteen pellets in a std 2 3/4" load, 20 in a magnum). I prefer #4B or #1B for home defense, not 00B - based on my experience.

As for shooting deer at extended distances, most shots will fall inside of 200-250 yards max! I'd be very hesitant about shooting beyond 300 yards, although I once killed an antelope around four hundred yards. I was feeling very lucy that day, until I learned my friend who's rifle and ammo I was using, had reloaded the ammo with a LeeLoader! He scooped the powder instead of weighing it.

In my 24 years of hunting elk, mule and whitetail deer, and antelope, shooting at game beyond 200-250-300 yards is ludicrous and isn't good for the game or the sport (and ethical responsibilities) or being a good and effective hunter.

Find what the rifle "likes" and is affordable. Then practice, practice and practice! Practice at 100 yards, at two hundred yards, and at CORRECTLY judging ranges and distances.

FWIW.
 
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