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My Mother passed down the enthusiasim for shooting to me yes. I will pass it on to both of my children when they are older.... provided they are interested in it in the slightest. Does that answer your question?:smokin "I can raise kids and still kick your *** in clays"
 

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Well my mother passed it down to me (with the help of my father). So I know that if i EVER have kids i will pass shooting down to them. Fantastic!! Browning, The Best there is because second best is well...second best.
 
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Thanks to my son's interest in trap shooting I am the first female in my family to enjoy shooting sports. I have in turn started my daughter's shooting. As much as they enjoy shooting I have no doubt that they too will pass this tradition along to my future grandchildren :D
 

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Well never thought I would be shooting clays...and beating Jay by the way......but yeah it is being passed down.....everytime we go out to shoot.....Skylar asks to shoot his rifle.....wish I would have someone to pass on to me......had to wait for Jay to pass on to me......j/k..... :roll:
 

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Both of our kids, 11 and nine, have shotguns, and we shoot clay targets often. They also like to hunt grouse, and sat in the deer stand last weekend (no guns). We have a lot of friends who we shoot with, and it helps to reinforce safe gun handling practices and positive experiences when someone besides your parents talks about and models safety. My dad always took my sisters and I grouse and deer hunting, and it's pretty sad for us right about now because he died two weeks ago. I want to make sure my kids have good memories of hunting and shooting like I do.
Catjerf
 

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yes women can carry on traditions down it might have been hard for my mom rasing a boy but she managed so ill mass it to my wife & kids when im married
 

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^77 Hey Jay!

Don't know if you're still checking replies but thought I'd give it a shot (no pun intended)! You may be happy and surprised to know there are women out there who are passing the tradition down. I am currently teaching my nephew, Joshua (13) how to shoot w/ 20ga shotguns and .22 rifles.
My sister is a single mother and, unfortunately, Josh lacks the opportunity to learn from traditional male role models (i.e. father, grandfather). I, luckily, had the privilege and honor of learning from my dad and grandfather and, surprisingly, it has fallen on me to uphold/preserve these traditions within our family!
Women quite often have the opportunity to play a role in preserving heritage in today's more non-traditional family schematics. I am proud and honored to help teach my nephew and future generations all about shooting/shotgunning. Our evenings together are priceless and I am gratelful to have these experiences with him, even if they are only due to circumstance!!!! Thanks for addressing this timely and important issue and allowing me this forum to set an example for other females!
 

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The question made me laugh.

You don't have to even have kids to pass on the tradition. Just expose and mentor kids and you have passed it on.

I have only been shooting a few years and belong to a gun club where some of the members have been members for over 50 years. There are only 2 really active female trap shooters at my club, myself and one other. Guess what? The two of us are the ones in my club who volunteered to run a Youth Peasant Hunt for kids under 18 who had taken their Hunter Ed but had no opportunity to go hunting. With her dog, my dog and a couple guys that we enlisted, we got those kids practiced up on the trap field, did a dress rehearsal day and then the hunt. All the kids went home with their first birds which they had dressed and supposedly cooked for their families.

She and I are running a youth trap shooting and shotgun safety event in the spring and we are starting up a youth committee to plan more events to get the boys and girls together around some wholesome activities. You take a nurturing woman and give her some interested kids and you have a formula for successful passing on of tradition.

In addition I have mentored a couple of boys from non-shooting families. One was with me on my most exciting day this past season when my dog found 8 birds in 1.5 hours. That's a record here, stocking truck must have just been by.

GSPgal
"Go ahead, break my clay."
 

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They most certainley do. Growing up in the hills of Kentucky, I wasn't allowed to go hunting because I was only 8 yre old. I was staying with my aunt for awhile. My uncle was notorious for taking off and being gone for weeks at a time chasing women and boozing it up. My aunt had 3 kids to feed including her pesky nephew. The only shotgun around was an old Nitro Hunter single shot with a bent barrel. She would take this thing out and with a handfull of shells, always bring back a couple of rabbits, some squirrells, quail, or something. One day She finally relented and took me with her. She showed my all the basics, just like her daddy showed her, and was there when I bagged my first pheasant. Yes Kentucky did have pheasant at one time. She took the time to teach me a sport that has been a lifetime of enjoyment. Kate turned out to be one of the best shots in the county.
 

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Absolutely. My mother is one helluva shot and I am fortunate enough to have inherited just a tiny bit of her skill. Unfortunately, i waited until I was 44 to start shooting. My 8 year old son has a 410 and a 28 gauge in the gunsafe next to his Red Ryder. He's already passed the safety portion of our state's hunter safety test though he'll have to wait a few more years to officially take the class. He is pretty darn proficient with an air pistol, a 22 and an air rifle. I'm learning about them now so I can keep up and when I feel comfortable and competent with those firearms we'll add them to our personal collection. My father, step-father, brother and a couple brother-in-laws are all fine bird and game hunters and we make sure my son gets all the appropriate exposure to hunting and shooting that he can have. I am thrilled that this is a tradition that we can share together for years to come.

By the way, he has a terrific roll cast and is working on the rest of his fly fishing skills and seems to have a knack for hitting a golf ball as well. All done with MOM right beside him! :D
 

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My 25 year old son expressed an interest in handguns so for a birthday present I signed him up for the 8 hour Handgun Safety Class and also gave him the money for his permit. I am not much interested in handguns but took the class with him and it was one of the best days we spent together. We got the prize for cleanest gun after the cleaning portion but one guy objected saying, "If my mother was helping me, I'd have won."
 

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My maternal grandmother taught me to fish and where to find phesants and waterfowl on her farm.

My father and mother hunted and fished and encouraged participation in both sports. Dad would pick me up after school with shotguns and gear so that we could hunt our way home.

Interestingly Mom and Dad's first "large purchase" after WWII was a Remington 31 pumpgun. And it was my mother's gift of a Husquvarna Crown Grade .30/06 that got my father and I out deer hunting.

I have a wife who had not previously shot firearm who now shoots skeet, practical pistol and sporting clays. For years she was the driving force behind our annual "deer camping" trip.

We have two daughters who both shoot--one has a strong interest in skeet and wing shooting. The other is a bit contrary and wants to hunt deer, shoot trap and has just discovered my 9mm. Both have refused to let me sell thier starter (youth) guns as they plan to teach thier children to shoot. With the older daughter a couple of potential boyfriends expressed negative opinons of firearms and would not try some form of shooting were dropped quickly.

With out my grandmother and my mother's support of hunting, my Dad might have left it all alone as he told me that after WWII and the Battle of the Bulge he'd had enough sneaking around in snowy forrests with a rifle.

Net result: one wife, two daugthers and a dozen friends of each are shooting in the 21st century thanks largely to my grandmother.
 

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My dad has a rifle that belonged to his grandmother (or great-grandmother, I forget which....) that she used to take deer and squirrels and such.... She was apparently a pretty avid hunter and passed that along to her family.

Dad's got some of his own first guns to keep in the family, and I'm also planning on keeping MY first guns to start my kids off with.
 

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Yes! Otherwise, I'm not sure that I would be enjoying hunting and shooting today! I too have treasured hand-me-downs that I plan to pass down as well someday. I like the idea of keeping my "firsts" and passing them down also. Good idea!
 

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With 2 boys they have all the interest in the world in shooting and hunting... They just think it's great to have a Dad & a MOM that's interested too!

:wink:
 

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since my last post I have formed a youth activities committee with another woman at my club and got funding and our own youth bulletin board. She and I got our NRA shotgun safety instructor certification and will be forming a scholastic trap team. I planned an intro to trap event for 12-18 year olds and although it won't happen till end of May, it is already wait listed. We have 10 boys, 5 girls and one of each on the wait list. Yesterday we did a monthly youth breakfast tour of the club and we had 3 girls and 2 boys, all between 13 and 16 learning what we have to offer and telling us what their interests are. we're organizing a boating safety course, a fishing intro, archery intro and will do the youth pheasant hunt again in the fall. I'm making arrangements to have 3 additional youth game bird hunts per year at a private preserve which ordinarily costs $1000 to belong - the owner wants the tradition passed down to youth. I discovered hunting late in life but get a real kick enabling teens to shoot trap and hunt. I love watching how responsible teens will behave when it is demanded of them and how gratifying it is when they succeed.

At my club we were losing the teens, as they were lured off by organized sports like soccor/etc. Nobody was organizing shooting, hunting, fishing and archery events for them. This other woman and I are building it and they are coming. So the answer to the question is Hellyes, anyone can pass on traditions - and truthfully it doesn't even have to be a long term tradition for the mentor as Kim and I both came to shooting and hunting only a few years ago. We are planning to run with the kids, as far as they want to go - into acquiring and training a bird dog, orienteering, trapping, whatever they want, we'll just find people who know what they're doing and make the connections.
GSPgal
"Hunt beside kids and over dogs."
 
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