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Flush or extended chokes, what's your preference? I have a Remington 1100 12 gauge with a 28" barrel and prefer flush chokes. I mostly use it for trap and Sporting Clays. I like the swing and feel. I've pondered going to extended chokes, but don't think I'd like that extra inch hanging out there. Are extended chokes worth the extra length and price, other than for the changing convenience?
 
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I have flush and extended. I like the extended better. As to balance, I have tried balancing the gun with the flush and with the extended and can tell no difference in the balance point. These chokes are really very light. The extended are much easier to change and maybe pattern a bit better.
 

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It is mainly for ease of changing chokes. On 1100 guns you wont find the ballance changed where you can tell. I store my guns barrel down to keep oils out of the butt stock so the extended chokes prevent wear on the end.
 

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I use the chokes that came with the gun, they are flush. I have never tried extended chokes. BUT I hardly ever change chokes :lol: so ease of changing does not worry me. One less thing to worry about.

If you are going to buy aftermarket chokes, make sure they are suited to the internal diameter of the gun - have you had it altered at all? Do they match the varying sizes of different models for your gun?

And then make sure you pattern them with your usual load. One student of mine and I spent a very informative morning at the pattern plate. Tubes marked IC were no such thing - more like full in his gun. YMMV !!

Roger
 

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I talked to Stu Wright about this very subject today. The extended chokes damage the shot a little less because the taper from barrel bore to choke is longer and therefore less severe. This helps reduce fliers and keeps the pattern more uniform.

Stu was the only choke manufacture that suggested I measure the bore of my gun before ordering a choke. Apparently Browning back-bored 12 gauge barrels vary in inside diameter from .738" to .745". Most choke manufacturers assume some fixed number, probably .742" since that is the nominal diameter.

Anyway, I plan on buy extended chokes from Stu Wright once I get my gun and measure the bore.

Scott
 

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My Remi 1100 Sporting 12 came with four extended chokes. This is just another reason I liked the Sporting 12 that comes only with a 28" barrel - an extra inch for an odd total length of 29". I think it's just a great length for any clays sport.

Couple-O-observations I've made about 'em:

1) Not a big deal, but beware of that extra inch when it comes to your shotgun carry cases. I use a break-down soft case made by Boyt. They come in three different sizes - small (28"), medium (30") and large (34"). I tried the small case, but no-go with that extended choke (unless I removed it).

2) I find that I need to periodically reach down and tighten my extended choke, sometimes two or three times during a match. I only tighten it as much as possible by hand, and never use any sort of pliers. As it's an external choke, there are no groves to use a wrench on it either. One thing I've been meaning to buy at the grocery store that will likely resolve this issue is one of those rubber jar opener pads - I think the extra grip it'll provide will be just right.
 

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Nothing gives me the heebie-jeebies more than seeing some one with a loaded gun fiddling with the extended choke. :shock:
PLEASE DO NOT DO THAT.

I guess this is a possible disadvantage to extended chokes as they allow unsafe behaviour? Not the chokes fault, its the user's stupidity.

Roger
 

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Not sure whether that last comment was directed at me or not, but I can assure all that I've never once touched a installed choke on a loaded firearm.

But on the flip side, I can see the previous author jumps to conclusions, which I find even more dangerous than his subject matter...
 

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Tom,

My comment was only addressed to those people who do what I mentioned, namely handle their chokes in the gun when the gun is loaded. It was not directed at you since you would never do that.

Thanks

Roger
 

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Extended. If I am 100% honest about why. its for appearance & convenience when changing. I have not found that they shoot any better than the flush mounted screw in chokes that came with the gun.

Rod. :oops:
 

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If I got my gun with flush chokes I wouldn't bother buying extended. My 870 came with flush chokes and that's all I used. My 1100 came with extended so I bought those.
 

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Extended chokes are nice because I can tell what I got in each barrel just by looking.
I can also change chokes without a special choke wrench (finger tight works well as long as you keep your threads clean, or else you'll be going for a choke wrench sooner or later).
The extended chokes add length to my barrels, without the added weight of longer barrels. Imagine the extra accuracy of a longer barrel without as much added weight.

Gil
 
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I just acquired an almost new fairly high quality europeon made
12 ga Side Lock O&U. It came with (5) factory tubes that have
a knerled extended portion that sticks out about 1/4" from the end of the barrels. It also came w/ a pair of after-market Skeet tubes that extend about 15/16" beyond the end of the barrels.

My question is this: Will I cause any pattern dis-ruption if I have one of the Skeet tubes in the bottom barrel (15/16" extension) and the factory I.C. tube in the top barrel(1/4" extension).

Is it possible that as the shot cup exits the tube w/ 1/4" extension, it will "impinge" or contact the extended portion of the (15/16" extended) tube in the other barrel?

Any comments from knowledgeable shooters (or choke people) would be sincerely appreciated. Thanks.
 

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As I've posted elsewhere, one possible advantage is you don't have to be right on your precious barrel (spendy guns) when you wrench them down or up. Less chance of slipping and marking your gun with the wrench - just because you're further away. I try to be careful, but a small point anyhow.
 
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