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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm working on a couple shotguns lately. College guy without a ton of money, so I don't plan to buy fancy stuff. I have a couple old doubles (working 12, disassembled 12 being restored, already restored 16) & this one fascinating single-shot 10 that needs help.

It's an American Arms semi-hammerless built in Boston, MA under the patent of George H. Fox. I'm in the process of getting it workable at least for display again; I've cleaned up the barrel and the stock already. It's a twist steel barrel with short chambers so I do not plan to fire a modern 10-gauge cartridge through it. If I ever do fire it, I am only going to use a low-pressure blackpowder load.

The gun is cocked by pressing down a lever located on the left side of the receiver, and the general profile & architecture make it feel like a fancy trap gun instead of an 1880s experiment.

Does anybody have one of these guns, and if you do, would you be willing to take a picture of how the receiver, extractor, and whatever little hook is in the bottom of the receiver, all go together? Mine doesn't extract. It also is missing its main spring. I've never seen parts come up for one of these so I am having to make pieces for it myself.

Picture of the gun & period-correct stool for 1892 organ.

Thanks

Plant Grass Art Tree Metal
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The internals. At some point I will strip it down and give it a bath in the ultrasonic tank if I can verify the chrome will not be loosened.

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This is fantastic. I'd love to see down inside the "slot" of the frame where the locking lug under the barrel goes; I can't figure out what actually is supposed to be in there to push the extractor & make that work. I see the slot on the lug itself, but the--I guess the word I'm looking for is the receiver frame? In there I haven't been able to find a good picture showing what actually trips the extractor when the gun is opened to unload.

These things are awfully overbuilt for twelve dollars!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Remington Arms Co. made a somewhat similar single barrels from 1893 to 1909.

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Remington also made some very nice double-barrels too, the 1894 and 1900 being pretty fun if you can find them. I have & shoot a nice, working Remington 1900. It's fantastic. 12 gauge, 30" regular steel barrels, 2 5/8" chamber. Two shots & it's about as reliable as you could ask for.

I've never seen the Remington side-cocker in the wild, but I do like the looks of them--very streamlined for that era.
 

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I'm well versed in Remington Hammerless Doubles. My father shot a pair of AE-Grades -- a 30-inch 12-gauge that for my whole life was "my ole Remington" as on those rare occasions when he missed a bird with his Parker Bros. 12 or the 20-gauge Model 101 I brought him from Japan, he'd say "I'd have got that with my ole Remington." He also had a 16-gauge, 28-inch, AE-Grade, 136036 or P136036 if one includes the stock letter in the serial number, which was stolen out of his house in 1978. Over the last forty years I've assembled a nest of Remington Hammerless Doubles in 12- and 16-gauge from KE to DEO-Grade. Need a 10-gauge, EEO-Grade to complete my set!! In that I've never seen a 10-gauge higher than CEO-Grade, I believe my wallet is safe!

Shenendoah Valley doves with my 16-gauge KE-Grade --

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